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Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child?

Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

If you have a child who is struggling with an auditory processing disorder (APD) you probably have many questions.

And the biggest question of all is “what can I do to help?” I have heard it again and again from concerned parents.

It can be so frustrating.

You know your child can hear, but sometimes it just seems like he can’t.

That’s what can happen in a child with auditory processing disorder (APD) or central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), as it is also called.

So what is auditory processing disorder?

In a child with APD, the brain doesn’t recognize and interpret sounds correctly—especially the sounds that make up speech. Your child may appear to have an auditory deficit, but in most cases, hearing is not the problem. It’s like there’s a disconnect somewhere between the ears and the brain. He can hear what you say, he just can’t always process it.

A learner with APD is like an old computer with a fast, new processor. Neither the old computer nor the child with APD can keep up. The data goes in, but once it’s in it can’t be processed quickly enough or efficiently enough. And in both cases the result is major frustration.

What are the signs of auditory processing disorder?

The symptoms of auditory processing disorder can range from mild to severe and may look different in different children. APD is diagnosed by an audiologist, but the child who has APD may display many of the following characteristics.

  • He may struggle to hear in crowded, noisy places.
  • He may frequently ask you to repeat yourself.
  • He may appear to be inattentive or he may be easily distracted.
  • He has difficulty following directions.
  • He may have noticeable speech delays.
  • He may seem to have heard you when he hasn’t.
Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

Why does APD make it so hard for children to learn to read and spell?

From the earliest stages of pre-reading instruction, when the development of phonemic awareness is so important, APD can make reading and spelling difficult. Because of the subtleties of similar sounding phonemes, APD hampers a child’s ability to match letter names and sounds. This struggle continues to complicate the vital process of learning and using phonograms to build words. How can a child learn to use and manipulate the most basic building blocks of language if he can’t “hear” them to begin with? Just imagine the difficulty of attempting to complete blending and segmenting exercises when you already struggle to hear and process isolated phonemes.

Down the reading road, students with APD may have difficulty recalling what they’ve read or putting their thoughts into words. And because APD learners struggle to hear the individual sounds in words, they may also struggle with rhyming, observing spelling patterns, learning new vocabulary, reading comprehension, oral and written expression, and so much more. In addition to all of that, many APD learners also struggle with long-term memory issues that affect their ability to retain language-based knowledge. It’s not hard to understand why children with APD have such a difficult time with reading and spelling, is it?

Can All About Reading and All About Spelling help my child?

Though your APD child will face many academic challenges, you can help him learn to read and spell. All About Reading and All About Spelling offer an instructional approach that is exactly what your APD child needs! Here are some of the ways that AAR and AAS are perfectly suited to your child’s special needs:

  • AAR and AAS are multisensory programs, meaning they approach learning through sight, sound, and touch. Because auditory instruction can be so difficult for children with APD, teaching through the visual and kinesthetic pathways is extremely important. This actually helps strengthen the weaker auditory pathway while still allowing learning to occur.
  • AAR and AAS both use specially color-coded letter tiles. When your child has auditory processing issues, “wordy” explanations can create unnecessary frustration for both of you. It is much more effective to demonstrate a reading or spelling concept with the letter tiles. Using the letter tiles can make all the difference for a child struggling to understanding a concept.
  • AAR and AAS are scripted in a clear and concise way, without excess verbiage. Scripted lessons allow you to concentrate on your child rather than on trying to figure out how to teach a skill.
  • AAR and AAS have built-in review in every lesson. Children with auditory processing difficulties generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. You can’t assume that everything that has been taught has been learned. The review boxes in AAR and AAS lessons allow you to customize your child’s review, concentrating only on the skills and concepts that need additional review. Your APD learner likely has a short attention span, so you want every minute of your lesson to count.
  • Both AAR and AAS are logical and incremental. Children with auditory struggles need structure and clear guidance, and these programs provide the organization they need to learn.
Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

How can I help my child learn in spite of his auditory processing disorder?

These tips may help you make your lesson times more productive and more enjoyable for both you and your child.

  1. Speak slowly and enunciate clearly. Pausing as you give instructions can also help your child process what you’re saying.
  2. Allow for “lag time” while your child processes what you have said. Let your words sink in for a few seconds before expecting a response or before moving on.
  3. Be concise and direct—don’t attempt long oral explanations. Give simple instructions, one step at a time. Instructing your child to “clean up your room, put on your pajamas, and brush your teeth” may be more than your child can handle.
  4. Work in a quiet room with as few distractions as possible. Listening and processing is hard enough for an APD child; distractions make it nearly impossible.
  5. Optimize concentration and minimize “meltdowns” by holding lessons during your child’s best time of day.
  6. Make sure that your child can watch your mouth as you speak. This is especially important if he easily confuses similar-sounding words. In APD learners, the ears and brain don’t work well together, so watching your mouth will help bring everything into synch. The sounds get “crisper” when the brain has visual cues to go along with the auditory cues.
  7. Show rather than tell as much as possible.
  8. Visual demonstrations are much more effective than oral explanations. If your APD child is struggling to learn a new concept or skill, try to teach the concept with a visual demonstration.
  9. Don’t overwhelm your child. Children with auditory processing issues can become disruptive or argumentative when they don’t understand something. If your child becomes frustrated and you sense a meltdown coming, back up in the lesson to a point where your child is more comfortable. Try presenting the new information again when your child seems ready to tackle it.
  10. Consistent and constant review encourages success … especially for APD learners. To ensure steady progress, be sure to include review in your lessons every single day.
Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

Your child will face many challenges as an APD learner, but there is hope. By applying some of the tips above during your instruction times, you can help your child overcome these challenges. Just take it one day at a time, and over time you will see progress—and a much happier child.

And remember you’re not alone. If you have questions about your child’s APD and how it affects reading and spelling instruction, please feel free to call or email us.

Does your child struggle with APD? What has helped? I would love to hear about it in the comments below!

Help Your Child's Memory Report

Photo credits: Pam at Everyday Snapshots and Jodi at JodiMcKenna.com.

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melisa

says:

My teen is in 10th grade, has ADHD and auditory processing – he can read and spell, but struggles retaining info when reading. We put him in a private school but they seem frustrated. What can we do to help him with retaining info from books but also, what do you recommend in accomodations? Writing a thesis is way beyond him and I don’t know what to do. The several steps the teachers give in writing a thesis are overwhelming and he never knows what to do in class. Anything more than 1 step is 1 step too many. What can we do?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melisa,
I’m sorry your teen is struggling in these ways.

A first accommodation would be for teachers not to give multi-step oral instruction. If they need to give multi-step instruction, they should write it down or give one step at a time. It may be that his teachers need some education as to what auditory processing disorder entails and how they can better accommodate him in their classes.

However, giving multi-step oral instruction is so common (it happens everywhere in life, not just in school), that it is also reasonable to work with your teen to build up his ability to follow directions. More than one step is too many now, so work with him on being able to hold two steps in his mind. Visualization is often helpful. Instead of just trying to remember the words for two steps, he should try to picture himself doing the one step then picture the next step. If it is a writing task, a picture of himself bent over a paper for both steps isn’t going to cut it. He needs to be able to picture two distinctly different things. Also, writing steps down is very effective, although for some reason those that need to write things down often seem the least likely to be willing to do it. However, he would have to be willing to ask the teacher or other person giving instructions to repeat, repeat, repeat as necessary to get all the steps. I would not expect someone with auditory processing disorder to be able to write down multiple steps after hearing them once.

Struggling with retaining what he reads is a comprehension problem, and suggests he isn’t reading as well as he could be. Comprehension is a very important aspect of reading. Reading comprehension issues can happen for a variety of reasons and without knowing the reason, it’s hard to give suggestions. For example:
1. There could be gaps in phonogram knowledge.
2. There could be fluency issues. With fluency issues, students can sound out what they read but can’t read it smoothly and easily. If they are focusing on the work of reading, they won’t be able to focus on understanding what they read.
3. Word guessing issues could be at the heart of the problem. Students that rely on word-guessing strategies may incorrectly guess which can make the passage not make sense. Some students may also skip words.
4. The student may be reading too fast. Sometimes the opposite of fluency issues is the case and students think that a “good reader” reads very quickly. Students who do this tend not to have time to think about the meaning of the text. See our blog post on reading too fast for more information.
5. There may be vocabulary issues. Students may have the phonics skills to sound out and read words that they don’t know the meaning of yet. This most common with young, advanced readers, but a student with auditory processing disorder may not recognize words read for words they know in conversation.

Having your teen read aloud to you is a really good way for you to be able to assess what’s going on and why he is struggling with comprehension. It’s hard to catch problems without hearing the student read. If your teen is guessing at words or struggling to read fluently, you will be able to hear that. Also, have him read for a sustained period, such as 15 or 20 minutes. Some students have difficulty with reading stamina and can read well, with good comprehension, for short periods but difficulties arise after 5 or 10 minutes.

Once you have an idea as to why he is struggling with retaining what he is reading, we can help you develop a plan to help him address those problems.

I hope this helps. Please let us know what you find after listening to him read aloud or if you have further questions.

Melisa

says:

Thank you. I feel the schools he has attended can only spend so much time with directions and it seems he tunes things out. He has failed tests so many times he’s just given up. He will do work but again, something like a thesis, is brain overload. He has been given a partner in a class but for whatever reason after a while he refuses to write down notes. He even has a math class with 4 kids and there are days he refuses help! He has a point where he doesn’t understand, gets frustrated then shuts down. He tells teachers he doesn’t care but I know it’s pure frustration.

His reading and spelling are good. No problem. With ADHD he just struggles to retain info from a book and recently Joy Luck Club was required reading. I’ve read/explained to him and had him watch video of someone reading but I think he must tune out if something is boring (I’m guessing).

Soon I think the private school will ask him to leave. He just refuses help! Last resort is charter school with 2 subjects at a time but homework packets are to be done at home. I’m not a teacher and he will just push it aside and ask to do it “later” I fear. Only idea is a few times a week a tutor to help him with homework and have a daily schedule. What do I do as he’s so stubborn and has moments where he is tired of sitting in class then they offer help and he refuses? I know he needs a break but I don’t think the school cares anymore

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melisa,
I wonder if your son has given up because of the difficulties he is having. My husband did something similar in 8th grade, feeling that it would be better to fail because he didn’t do the work at all than to fail after doing the work (my husband is dyslexic). However, it is not uncommon for 9th and 10th grade students to just not care. You would have to get to the bottom of what is causing his refusal to work and be helped. Start by having a long, non-confrontational discussion with him. It is likely he knows why he is refusing help and once you know why you can begin to formulate a plan to help him.

You mention reading Joy Luck Club to your son and watching a video of someone reading it. Auditory processing disorder makes retaining and learning from auditory information much more difficult. That is not him not retaining what he reads; that his him not retaining what he hears. While many people find it easier to listen to a book than to read it, not everyone does. Some people need to actually read the material themselves in order to fully understand it and learn from it. How does he do when he reads a book himself?

Again, I’m sorry he is struggling in these ways, but it sounds like there is much more than his struggling due to auditory processing disorder and ADHD going on. I hope you can find the root cause of his refusal to help and not want to do the work.

Norma Mijares

says:

Thank you so much for your very educational information. I have been observing my grandchild who has been going through this disorder; but I did’nt know how to deal with it. The tips that you shared help me a lot to understand and help her as well. Again, thank you. GOD bless.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Norma,
We are happy to hear that this information was helpful for you with your grandson. We would be happy to help with any additional questions you may have.

Robin

says:

Thank you so much for this information. I am pretty sure my grandson suffers from this … everything that you have been saying to do is exactly right!
I am a talker and that causes him to have meltdowns … the more I explain the less he understands. We always thought that he had a hearing problem and his speech was different. He has struggled for a long time with reading and spelling .. leaving out letters and words in sentences . He has an impecible memory of movies, life events, details like you would not believe. But then when someone reads history to him he hardly remembers a word. He doesn’t understand it. Even the subjects he loves become intolerable.
So…. with all that I thank you for sharing this info with us!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Robin. And now that you have a better understanding of your grandson’s needs, you can tailor his instruction better. Please let us know if you have further questions or need help with anything.

Angela

says:

How do I get my child tested for APD?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Angela,
An audiologist can test and diagnose for APD. Your child’s pediatrician can refer you to an audiologist.

Dee

says:

Please help me I don’t know where else to turn x

Dee

says:

When talking to my gradaughter, sometimes she explodes walks away, then comes back seemingly calmed down. Does anybody recognise this behaviour?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Dee,
I would ask her why she does that, what is happening that causes her to explode that way and what she does in order to restore her calm. Even young children can provide amazing insights into what is going on within themselves if they are asked.

It is possible that she is becoming overwhelmed in some way. It could be emotional, sensory stimulus, confusion, or something overloading her ability to cope. Then, when she walks away, she is finding a way to cope again.

I hope this helps. If you have further concerns, please let us know what sort of situations lead to this behavior.

Keelah

says:

So my son actually does wear hearing aids (he has trouble hearing high pitch frequency and soft sounds) however , his hearing loss was confirmed and treated when he was 5yrs old already in kindergarten, to make a long story short, he displays signs of APD but academically he does superb that which disqualifies him from speech assistance and any assistance for the most part that I seek to help him accelerate more proficiently .he also can process simple commands but when it comes to your average 9yr old conversation, he struggles with communicating effectively and clearly. Words become jumbled and crossed, point of message is missed and he’s frustrated no longer wanting to share his thoughts or what he was trying to say. Help! Any at home material we could buy or create? Ideas on daily activities we could do?! Thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Keelah,
I’m so sorry to hear that your son is struggling in this way.

Without knowing the root cause of you son’s struggles with conversation, it is difficult to suggest activities that could help him. It would probably be most helpful to have him evaluated. You could put in a written request to the school detailing his struggles with conversation and oral commands. I would hope this would result in an evaluation regardless of his abilities academically. However, you could also request an evaluation from your audiologist. Since he already has a history of hearing loss, getting him into an audiologist for a full evaluation should not be a problem, although depending on your insurance you may have to request a referral from his pediatrician. It may also be beneficial to have an evaluation from a speech-language pathologist. What you describe could certainly be Auditory Processing Disorder, but it could be something else like expressive language issues too.

Conversation is too important for human interaction for your son not to be given help. However, you may have to advocate for him in order to get him the help he needs.

Venessa Sandoval

says:

My 4 year old granddaughter seems to have all the signs of APD. She has had her hearing tested which seems to be normal. We are looking for other learning tools to help aid in her care. We watch her a few times a week. Thanks so much.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Venessa. Please let us know if you have any questions. We’d love to help as much as we are able.

Stacie

says:

No sure if my daughter has APD – we had her tested by a neuro-psychologist and won’t get the results back until our follow-up appt on June 7th. I’ve been homeschooling her since 1st grade (she’s finishing up 3rd grade now). She went to Kindergarten at a private school. I noticed with my daughter almost right away that she wasn’t retaining a majority the material. I’ve switched curriculum four times in hopes of finding the right one but it doesn’t seem to matter if it’s me reading the material to her, her reading / doing workbooks or if it’s computer/ video/ media based learning. Example; We’ve been working on the 12 months of the year for over 2 yrs (even bought a felt calendar for her to change the days/ months) and she still can’t remember them. We can’t move on to multiplication since she can’t retain the basic addition/ subtraction, odd/even, counting by 2’s, 5’s ect. In fact, we’ve gone over the material so much her little brother has it memorized and will correct her- which I know only adds to her frustration. Any ideas on if this due to APD? I feel like we’re spinning our wheels plus, I’m worried the neuro-psychology testing won’t uncover what we’re dealing with.

Thank you in advance for sharing your thoughts!

Cherie

says:

For math ,have you tried Right Start Math? It has worked well with dyslexic kids.maybe APD, also.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Stacie,
Having great difficulties with memorization is a sign of dyslexia, and I completely understand. My son is 14 and when I quizzed him on the months of the year earlier this week he got them all right and in order except he completely skipped October and didn’t even notice. We did the felt calendar thing for years too. Anything memorized without context (the alphabet, months of the year, even math facts have no meaning or context to them) is almost too hard to contemplate. He still struggled but did better with memorizing things with context, such as poems or Bible verses.

You may have to give up the idea of your daughter having complete mastering of the addition facts before going on in math. I let my son use manipulatives for math as long as he needed them and gave an additional chart and allowed him to use that as much as he wanted. Then with multiplication I did the same. After years of using manipulatives and the chart, he did memorize the addition facts but he is still slower than many consider acceptable. He mostly has the multiplication facts down now too and is doing very well with Pre-Algebra.

What I had to do with him was differentiate between memorizing and learning. The two aren’t the same. He could read, he could do multi-digit multiplication, he could understand the differences between insects and arachnids, and speak for great lengths about the Revolutionary War. He was learning a lot. But memorizing anything was long hard work on his part.

I hope the results you get on the 7th will helps you to have a better picture of how to proceed with your daughter. Please let us know what you find and we can help you start thinking of new ways to help your daughter succeed with learning. We have a lot of experience with struggling learners and are happy to share what we have found.

Stacie

says:

Hey Robin- We got the results back on my daughter (she’s actually my niece but we are now raising her because her mom/ my sister, died). Anyway, she was dx with Reactive Attachment Disorder / PTSD, ADHD, depression/ anxiety and several learning deficits. I’ll get the written report next week with the more detailed info. They said her memory was fine. I asked about why she has trouble recalling / remembering and the neuro-psychologist said it’s part of what RAD children do- so they can avoid doing work and also as a way to control / manipulate the environment. This is heart breaking…but RAD is from neglect during infancy and is actually considered a brain injury. Knowing that really makes me sick to my stomach and I feel horribly guilty. I didn’t live near my sister but after talking with my family, they said the DX makes sense.

We are finding an “Attachment Therapist” and also looking at some private schools in our neighborhood that specialize in teaching Applied Behavioral Curriculum. Anyway, I just wanted to fill you in on what they found!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for letting us know, Stacie. I was wondering.

I sorry your daughter and you have to struggle in these ways, but I am glad to know that a diagnosis can lead you toward the right resources that will help her.

Christy

says:

Thank you for this. It’s very encouraging. And feels good that I’m not allow. And need to seek help and guidance for my son.

Merry

says: Customer Service

I’m glad that this is encouraging, Christy. Please know we are here to help–feel free to email with questions any time: support@allaboutlearningpress.com

Steph

says:

I have been using All About Reading with my daughter for a couple of years and seen huge strides with her. Although she has not been diagnosed with Auditory Processing issues, I know that they are there. She is doing very well with the progressions in phonemes, and the repetition of the word cards and levelled text in the reading reviews and stories. It’s so amazing to see her integrate her learning into her reading and also, though more slowly, into her writing and spelling, with All About Spelling. Now I am using this program with my younger daughter too. The stories are also so lovely!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Steph,
Thank you for letting us know how well All About Reading has been working for your daughter!

Diana

says:

Hi,

I am so happy to have found your website on auditory processing disorder. My child was diagnosed with speech delay when he was 2 years old. Since then, it has been a constant struggle with his learning ability. I never understood why sometimes he seems to hear me and sometimes he seems not to be able hear me or simply respond to me. A friend of mine told me about APD and I do believe my oldest child does have this disorder. As you may have already know, my child is struggling in Kindergarten reading and has trouble retaining oral information. I look forward in using your product. Thank you very much.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Diana,
I happy to know that his article has been helpful to you. Please let us know if you need any further help or have any questions.

Meg

says:

Hello,
My sweet 6 year old son has APD- and while we receive speech help both in school & privately…I’m at a loss with how to help him when he is overwhelmed by loud noises. He really HATES riding the school bus & gets overwhelmed in the very noisy swim lessons {the pool is so echo-ey and loud}. I’ve switched him to private swim lessons with his brother, which helps a bit. But, do we accommodate him & just pick him up- or do we encourage him to ride the bus and learn to cope? And what can he do to cope? I’m at a loss- and the teachers and speech therapists do not have any ideas either.

I’m ordering the ABR program today- so we can do it together this summer – he is doing OKAY in school- he is on par with his classmates, but just seems to be a bit of a late bloomer with everything.

Thank you SO SO SO much!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Meg,
Last week my family camped at the Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park has a shuttle bus system that takes visitors all over the park and we made full use of it so that we didn’t have to drive from our campground to the Visitor Center and the rim. However, the bus rides were not pleasant. They were crowded, noisy, and overwhelming. Now, I am an adult and I do not have problems with auditory processing and I found the short rides something to be tolerated with gritted teeth. I can only imagine how much worse it must be for a young child with auditory processing disorder on a bus full of children twice a day.

However, there may be ways to help him to find the bus more tolerable. The first I recommend is having him sit right behind the bus driver. Since he has an official diagnosis, you may be able to get the driver to save that seat for him. Behind the driver tends to be less noisy, plus I have found my son with auditory processing disorder does better with sound behind him than sound in front of him.

If that doesn’t work or is not an option, might be able to get the school district to provide him busing on a special needs bus. These have only a few kids and at least two adults. He would need to have an IEP with the school for special busing, but since he has auditory processing disorder I suspect he has one already. You may have to jump through a few hoops that document that a regular bus causes him anxiety in order for him to qualify for special needs busing, however.

Another option, one that could be used in combination with the above, would be to see if he would like to try sound canceling earbuds and some music, or even earplugs. My son likes film score music, such as the score from How to Train Your Dragon and other movies, as there are no words yet the music is familiar. He finds it calming and it helps him to focus.

Lastly, six years old is still very young and accommodating him until he learns to better tolerate (even with gritted teeth) is reasonable. As my son has grown older he has become more and more tolerating of loud and echoey places (he is fourteen now). It may be that simply allowing him more time to mature before requiring him to ride the bus will be the best thing for him.

I hope this gives you some options to consider and that you find something to make the trip to and from school pleasant for your son. Please let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.

Brandi

says:

I just received my AAR yesterday and I’m so excited to start it with my 6 yr old son. He was just FINALLY diagnosed as CAPD this week, even though we’ve known it for a long time. He can read some words in books (usually CVC words) but can’t remember sight words, struggles with remembering some sounds (y,w), distinguishing sounds (m&n, e&i) and he can’t understand our old phonics lessons and gets overwhelmed with it. He also has speech issues, though he is now understood by most everyone. I’ve waited and waited until I thought he was really ready to begin reading and I think he is. I’m praying this works for him!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Brandi,
Please let us know now things go with your son. We are committed to helping you help him succeed, so contact us if you have questions or need anything.

Sheila

says:

I have a 3 uear old girl and she is suspected to have apd. she is not developing vocabulary. How can i help?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sheila,
I understand. My 3rd child has Auditory Processing Disorder, and at two and half he had a vocabulary of fewer than 10 words. Speech therapy helped him and helped me to learn how to help him at home as well. So, I recommend looking into that.

I found the book Teach Me to Say It Right by Dorothy P. Dougherty helpful, although it was more help after he was speaking as it focuses on correct pronunciation more than vocabulary development.

The best thing we did at home was for me to sit with him with books every day. I started with board books and other very simple books and read them to him slowly, with very clear speech. Also, I had a whole stack of books with photos of everyday objects, so that we could point and name the item. “See the shoe? Shoe. Where is the shoe? Shoe.” He would point to it, and I would say, “Yes, that’s the shoe. Shoe. Say shoe. Shoe.” Lots of repetition, and if he made any attempt to say the word I praised him greatly. Note, this was not the same as bedtime stories, as it had to be a time of day when he was not tired so that he could focus to the best of his ability.

I hope you find the help you need for your daughter. As a way of encouragement, my son is now 14 and has an advanced vocabulary compared to most teenagers.

amy

says:

Hello! My daughter is 6 and can read most sight words at k/1 level but she struggles with answering questions in conversations due to APD. Should we start at the pre level or level 1?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
Have you looked over the All About Reading 1 placement test? Pay close attention to the section labeled Phonological Awareness, as that is the areas she is most likely to struggle with due to APD. How does she do with it?

If she struggles a lot with phonological awareness, she would benefit from completing the Pre-reading level first, or at least working on the phonological awareness skills that the Pre-reading level builds.

On the other hand, if she does okay with the the AAR 1 placement test (not necessarily perfect, but pretty good), then go ahead and begin with AAR 1.

If you are unsure, give us examples of which items on the placement test she struggled with and which she did well with and we can help with placement.

Amy Smith

says:

We have not done syllables at all. If I ask her the beginning or ending sound in a word she doesn’t respond. I have to point to the letter and ask her what sound it makes, then she understands.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Well then, Amy, it sounds like she would benefit from our Pre-reading level first. She needs to be able to isolate sounds in language without visual clues, and Pre-reading will help with that.

Juill

says:

My son has all the above mentioned characteristics of APD and has been tested twice (at ages 5 and 6) by the school district, per my request, and I’ve been told there’s no issue. It’s frustrating.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Juill,
Did the school bring in an audiologist? Only audiologists can diagnose auditory processing disorder. You might find going through your pediatrician to get a referral to an audiologist more successful. If an audiologist also tells you there is no issue, you can be more sure that there truly isn’t one and can look into the possibility of something else.

Meghan

says:

Juill-
Generally an audiologist will not see a child until they are 7 to get a correct diagnosis. My daughter struggled since K, and at the request of her 2nd grade teacher we went and had her tested, but they wouldn’t test until she turned 7, because developmentally they aren’t ready until then. Best of luck!

Tamara

says:

This sounds exactly like my 7 year old son! We are struggling to get a diagnosis and help, but you could have written this article about him. We are in our first year of using AAR and will use AAS 1 when we finish AAR 1. He is starting to make progress for the first time ever, and I am so glad we made the switch.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tamara,
I am so pleased that All About Reading is working so well for your son!

Amy

says:

My daughter is in 4th grade and was diagnosed with APD in the 2nd grade. She has been working with an SLP off and on since her diagnosis. We started homeschooling this year to help meet her needs and minimize her anxiety level. We are looking for a good spelling program for her. Would it be hard for her to jump into this program at this point? Her reading is at grade level so we feel good there. We are just trying to foster the love of reading for her. Also, do you have any recommendations for good grammar and vocabulary programs for kids with APD? Thank you for your help!
Amy

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
All About Spelling made a world of difference for my APD child, and we have had numerous excellent reports from other families as well.

We recommend starting with level 1 of All About Spelling to build a strong foundation in spelling.

All About Spelling is a building block program with each level building upon the previous one. The rules and concepts learned in Level 1 are applied in Level 2, and then those are applied in Level 3, and so on. Placement for spelling is based on the student’s knowledge of spelling rules and concepts rather than grade level, reading level, or the words a student has memorized.

For example, we find that many students simply memorize easy words like “cat” and “kid” but have no idea why one uses a C and the other uses a K, or that the same rules that apply to these words also apply to higher level words such as “concentrate.” Other students switch letters or leave out letters entirely. This usually occurs because they don’t know how to hear each sound in the word. Level 1 has specific techniques to solve these problems.

We encourage you to “fast track” if your daughter knows how to spell most of the words but does not understand the underlying basic spelling concepts. In this case, very quickly skim the parts that she already knows and slow down on the parts that she needs to learn. Pull out several words as examples. Make sure she understands the concept being taught, and then move on. This blog article has a good example of how you might fast track, as well as other information on using All About Spelling with older students.

We have a recent blog post on How to Build Your Child’s Vocabulary that you will likely find helpful. Research suggests that a vocabulary curriculum is not the most effective means to improving vocabulary.

There are a number of grammar programs available that have either multi-sensory components or an incremental approach. Some of the programs focus exclusively on grammar, while some include writing as well. Here are a few suggestions:

– Winston Grammar is a hands-on program with color-coded cards, and is generally aimed at students in 4th to 7th grades.

– Easy Grammar features an incremental approach and includes topics such as usage and punctuation, for 2nd grade and up.

– Essentials in Writing is described by author Matthew Stephens as a Math-U-See approach to writing. In the elementary levels, this program incorporates grammar with writing. The lessons are presented in short video segments of 3 to 5 minutes and then the student works on the concept that was taught. This is a multisensory and incremental program that is very easy to use. There are levels for 1st-12th grades.

– The Sentence Family is a simple and fun program aimed at 3rd through 6th graders. The program uses drawing along with a story line to teach the nine parts of speech and how they relate to each other.

– Hands-On English with Linking Blocks is an intriguing program that uses wooden blocks and flash cards for a truly hands-on approach.

– Analytical Grammar teaches a mastery of grammar by working on it for short grammar focused units once a year for 2 to 3 years. Junior Analytical Grammar is for 4th or 5th graders, with Analytical Grammar for 6th to 9th graders.

Please let us know if you have any further questions or if we can help in any additional way!

Natasha

says:

Hello Amy http://www.spellingcity.com is pretty good.

Sarah

says:

I am pretty sure that my 10 yr old has auditory processing issues. He is great at math, handwriting, ect but reading has been a slow progress. Where should I start? Also, are there any books you recommend for parents? I really need direction…. thank you

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
You can discuss the possibility of Auditory Processing Disorder with your son’s doctor. Official diagnosis of Auditory Processing Disorder is done by an audiologist, and partial hearing loss has to be ruled out first. Your pediatrician or family doctor can refer your son.

In the mean time, begin teaching him in ways that allow him to use visual and tactile learning in concert with auditory learning. Learning phonograms and using letter tiles often make learning to read and spell much easier to understand.

Our All About Reading and All About Spelling programs have multisensory learning planned out in easy to use, open-and-go lessons. We have placement information on this page, and we are available here, by email (support@allaboutlearningpress.com), or by phone (715-477-1976) if you have further questions or need help in any way.

Cheri

says:

We just learn of our daughter having APD. She is in the 2nd grade, we have been struggling to get her help, but it is finally happening. My question is where do we start at home. I have been reading articles and etc., and i feel like I have information overload right now. Do you have any suggestions on where to start and how we can help her at home.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Cheri,
The first thing I would recommend would be to explain to your daughter what Auditory Processing Disorder is and how it affects her. Sadly, children with learning disorders can end up feeling as if they are stupid because they can’t do things as easily as other children. It is important for her to know that her difficulties have nothing to do with her intelligence.

It is also important that she understand that you are going to be trying new things in order to make learning more successful for her. You are learning about APD and how to help her succeed in school. Now that you both understand what the difficulty is, you can prepare to teach her in a way that she can learn.

From there, consider how you can make all learning more tactile and visual for her. Don’t just explain multiplication, get some blocks (or pennies, or buttons, or whatever small objects you have) and show her that 3×6 is the same thing as 3 groups of 6. Don’t just explain that Canada is north of the United States, get the globe and have her run her fingers over Canada. With a little thought, it isn’t difficult to make most all topics more visual and hands-on.

APD will affect more than just her academics as well. Have plans in place for helping her with oral instructions. Children with APD commonly struggle with multi-step instructions. For example, “Put your things away, brush your teeth, and get your pajamas on,” could result in only one or two of the times done and the others “forgotten”. Remind yourself that this isn’t true forgetfulness, but rather her struggle with auditory processing. Aim to give no more than two step instructions at a time, or even better give her one instruction followed with, “then come back to me.” Another option could be visual chore charts. With time, you can work with her with visualizing steps of instructions to help her remember.

Understand that while auditory processing disorder does make many things difficult, it doesn’t make anything impossible. These kids grow up to be wonderful, successful adults. Your daughter will too.

Lastly, please let us know if you have any questions. We are here to help you help your daughter.

Cheri

says:

Thank you so much!

Anita C.

says:

Your articles have been so helpful in exposing some possible issues my son may have. He shows some signs of dysgraphia and your recent post about Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) has also proven eye-opening and helpful. I thank the “All About” staff and those folks in the trenches who have cared enough to share their experiences and insights, too. We are grateful for the education as we can now begin to understand him better and create a learning environment for him with less frustrations for us all. We are looking into the many suggested avenues to help him. Knowledge is truly empowering and freeing! Thanks to everyone!

I do have a question though. I have scheduled 20-30 minutes to work on his AAS Level 2 lessons and find that we consistently run out of time to move forward with new learning beyond the daily review portion. Sometimes we are able to get just the yellow and red cards completed before time is up. It’s usually the red cards that give him more trouble due to the need to either write or type (he’s just learning to type) his responses. It seems he’s gotten stuck on the /k/ sound and when to use it. He’d been pacing along at about 2 steps a week—an amazing leap from his former spelling curriculum. Do I just move forward past the /k/ step? Do I just toggle between the review options (say, pick 2 of 4 on a rotating basis?)

I thank you ahead of time for your answer and help.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Anita,
Did your son do All About Spelling level 1 first? AAS 1 covers the same material as the first nine Steps of AAS 2, but does it more slowly and fully. If your son has not completed AAS 1 already, then it sounds like he could very much benefit from it. If he has done AAS 1 already, then go back to Steps 16, 17, and 19 of AAS 1 and reteach the /k/ sound from there.

A pace of two steps per week is a somewhat quick pace; many students spend about a week per step. Since he is struggling, consider slowing down. He does need to have a at least a moderate amount of mastery of the /k/ sound step before moving on. Future steps will assume he already has this down, and the /k/ sound is used very frequently.

How many days a week are you working on AAS? Students that struggle do much better with retention if they work on spelling 5 days a week. It is unusual for the card review portion of each day’s work to take more than 5 minutes or so, so I am concerned about that. Has he mastered many of the yellow and red cards? If he has not mastered most of them, then I highly recommend stopping all forward progress in AAS 2 until he gets them mastered. One thought with the red cards. Instead of having him write or type the phonogram, ask him to point to the tile. That should move reviewing along quicker.

I hope this helps some. Please let us know what his previous spelling experience has been, how old he is, and anything else that can help us understand his needs more fully.

Anita

says:

Thank you, Robin, for your timely response!
We started AAS 1 for the end of his “4th” grade year. He is now 11 (B-day in January). Even though he’d had spelling experience (he was below grade level), we went with the AAS recommendation to start from scratch which has been great thus far for both of my kids (sister is 10). His confidence has grown greatly. I’ve had to separate their daily spelling time as his sister has moved steadily ahead of him (is in Level 3 and sometimes she will accomplish a full lesson per day and loves the dictation portion).

I started them both with Joyce Herzog’s “Scared-y Cat” program and they started well enjoying the “Lettermaster” story where the letters get their sounds. Sometimes they complain that we now call “Scared” vowel sounds “Short” and “Brave” are now “Long”—my son still gets hung up occasionally—but I know what he means.

I noticed the repeat/review as they moved to Levels, but didn’t change or skip anything and kept pace with their individual mastery. In fact, after a summer break, I backtracked to go over/review the steps/concepts to see that they remembered as we’d not finished the Level before the break. We went back, step by step following the script. They moved along at their individual paces more quickly as expected and he didn’t show any issues with spelling the older words and he’d mostly nail them. If he didn’t get it, I’d ask him to practice it and he’d be OK—although the handwriting was/is terrible (we used Handwriting With Out Tears, but he doesn’t always follow the lines or has a’s looking like g’s; n’s like h’s or varies letter heights).

He answers the blue key cards well, rarely misses a yellow card, but some of the red ones sometimes get him (like /c/, /ch/, /ck/, /i/, /e/). I do have him look at me as I say them if he gets hung up. That helps sometimes. I’ll use your recommendation to have him point at the tiles instead of write or type—thanks for that! I will definitely go back to Level 1 on Monday doing 16, 17 and 19 as recommended, too.

This situation about the review cards taking so much more time has recently come up in the last few weeks. He doesn’t complain about doing spelling—he’s generally compliant about class times, but doesn’t like me changing the usual sequence/schedule and sometimes will be upset and say that I didn’t tell him, while I did announce to both of them the change first thing when school starts.

He is a bit stubborn about following the steps (say the sound/word as he writes or tiles) and depending on the day he’ll be exasperated if I remind him. I’m making a big effort to restate the steps before we begin and I am catching him doing it right first and praise him before I correct. The darn thing is he agrees that if he sounds it while he tiles/writes he does much better, but he’ll still bristle occasionally—he’s human, too.)

Thanks again, and I appreciate any further insights you may have.
~Anita

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Anita,
Thank you for taking the time to type all of this out. I now have a clear idea of where your son is at. Overall, it sounds like you have a great handle on All About Spelling and your son’s unique needs.

I’m not familiar with the Scared-y Cat program, but the scared and brave vowels sounds cute!

You have probably seen this already, but just in cast I’d like you to know we have a blog post on Dysgraphia.

Since this issue with reviewing the cards taking so long is recent, I recommend to keep reviewing and not worry about any forward progress for a while. Hopefully he will get over this bump in short order, and get back to making forward progress. If this situation with the review cards doesn’t resolve in the next couple weeks, please let us know.

You can change up review with the cards, such playing a board game like Sorry and requiring each player to answer a red card before taking their turn. You could have separate piles for your son and daughter.

Another idea would be to put the yellow cards on the table all scattered and then read off the red cards. He would then find the yellow card that matches the red card you read. Yet a third idea, you could use the Phonogram Sound app for review. You read the red cards and he could click on the phonogram on the app for immediate feedback.

As for his exasperation when you change the schedule, maybe you can come up with a visual schedule that is easily changed so that he can see changes. Something as simple as a small white board with the day’s sequence written out may make a large difference for him. Retaining information given orally is difficult for those that struggle with Auditory Processing Disorder.

I hope this helps some. Do let us know how things progress over the next couple weeks.

JENNIFER GILLESPIE

says:

Hi ! Our daughter is 8 . 3rd grade. Loves to read, makes A-B grades in most subjects. However, she has a Horrible time with her spelling. we can go over the words, have her write them many times correctly, but she tends to “forget” how the word is spelled, especially with the tricky “ie, ei, ou, ” sounds and words. She was pre mature at birth, born at 27 weeks. We have never noticed other issues but this “memory issue” we have narrowed down, or maybe not hearing the sounds well enough ? They are telling me that testing for dyslexia is not tested until end of 3rd grade however they did do some little testing in classes to see if that tended to be the problem and it doesnt show to be that. I just found this information and wondered how to get her tested or what to do ? any advise will be welcome ! thank you !

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jennifer,
If you do suspect Auditory Processing Disorder, ask her primary care provider to refer her to an Audiologist for testing.

Other than seeming to not hear the sounds in words well, are there any other signs from this blog post that your daughter has? If not, then Auditory Process Disorder may not be the issue. The phonograms you listed, ie, ei, ou, are all tricky. All of the sounds for each of these three are sounds also made by other phonograms. English has 250 spellings for just 45 sounds, and there are 9 ways to spell the long e sound alone!

It might be that she simply needs more explicit teaching. Some kids sort of get the patterns and rules in English by intuition, but many do not. Asking her to memorize all words by sight is giving her only one strategy to rely on for spelling, when using more than one strategy is much more effective. All About Spelling teaches students to use 4 spelling strategies.

This article covers why the “list-on-Monday, test-on-Friday” method of teaching spelling does not work well for many students, and it discusses what All About Spelling does that is different.

Many families have found the solution to a student’s poor spelling in school is to use All About Spelling after school. We recommend spending just 20 minutes a day on spelling, so it is not difficult for most families to fit it in each afternoon or evening. We have a pdf document that discusses the issues with using our programs for “afterschooling” (as it is sometimes called). Let me know if you are interested in seeing it.

Joann T

says:

My 7th grade son, whi was diagnosed when he was 7, still has so much trouble with composing written assignments. Any suggestions?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Joann,
You might consider allowing him to compose orally. You could serve as a scribe or typist for him, or you could try a speech to text option. There is software for that, but most smartphones have some sort of speech to text option now-a-days. Software you can buy, such a Dragon NaturallySpeaking, will add punctuation and allows you to add formatting by voice. Free speech to text options, such as on a smartphone, are typically very limited in what punctuation and formatting you can do orally. However, after you have the words in text form, it may not be so hard to go in by hand and add the punctuation and formatting.

Or, is your son having trouble with putting his thoughts together in an organized way? My APD 8th grader has a problem with this, and we have found graphic organizers to help tremendously. Graphic organizers are visual means for organizing thoughts and words before beginning writing. My son likes the Inspiration software I purchased for that purpose, but there are plenty of paper graphic organizers you can find and download for free with a google search.

Most of all, the biggest thing is to give your student lots of time for written compositions. If he needs to do a 3 paragraph essay, he may need one day just to discuss his ideas aloud and to use a graphic organizer, although some students may need to do these over two days. Then the next day he would get his words on paper or digitized in whatever way. Then he will need a third day to edit and revise as needed. He might need a forth day for editing and revising as well. Then, when the paper is all finished, he should get a break!

I hope this gives you some ideas. If his specific difficulties are in a different area than I covered here, please let me know. Also, please let me know if you have any further questions.

Frank Simmons

says:

We think my 2 year old grand-child may have this condition. I could be standing three feet from him and call his name and he does not respond as one might expect. He also his difficulty getting words out and when he does it excites him and he claps. He interacts with others well and loves to watch children programming on an IPAD. He is very sociable and enjoying swimming, water slides etc. Can this condition every be cured?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Frank,
The first thing to do is rule out hearing loss. What you describe could be early symptoms of Auditory Processing Disorder, but it also could be symptoms of a partial hearing loss. Early intervention with hearing loss is very important, and children even younger than two years can have their hearing tested. His pediatrician can refer him to an audiologist for testing, and such testing is typically covered by insurance.

Auditory Processing Disorder has no cure, but there are many interventions and programs that can help them to work through their difficulties and be very successful. Someone with Auditory Processing Disorder is likely to always find it easier to take in information by visual or hands-on means, but with work and training they can learn to take in auditory information too.

Do have your grandson’s parents follow up on having his hearing tested, however. If the problem is hearing loss, the sooner that is addressed the sooner he will start fully developing language.

Frank Simmons

says:

Thanks Robin. He has been tested for hearing issues but I think an advance screening might be useful.
We will follow-up.

Sandra Howard

says:

Wow….. my daughter is 10 in 6th grade and was just diagnosed in March of this year. I think her teachers don’t believe that she has issues that require accommodations because she’s an avid reader, comprehends what she reads well, can spell, has a great vocabulary and writes beautifully. She’s always been a good student, is 1 of the top readers in her school, can answer questions in her writing/ELA class and does well in her other subjects as well. Math became a struggle in the 4th grade. Long division, word problems, etc….are hard for her. I’ve had 1 teacher tell me she got her BA in special education and that’s what she’s trained in (which has nothing to do with anything) so she doesn’t understand how my daughter can read a book in the middle of class with noise but can’t follow directions and do her work in the same class. I told her the 2 are not the same. She doesn’t have to process directions when she’s reading. My daughter told me she gets frustrated with the noise so she reads. The teacher told me she’ll say what others are doing so my daughter knows what she should be doing. My daughter and I told her that isn’t going to work. My daughter had no idea what she was talking about because she didn’t even know that she was directing her comments towards her! Her hand writing is sloppy and I’ve been fussing at her for years, she can write neatly but she says it hurts to do so. She has become argumentative or will cry when she gets frustrated because she doesn’t understand what you want her to do or what you’ve said and she tries to tell you she doesn’t understand and you don’t get it. Also she has poor short term memory and needs constant reminders. Common sense isn’t so common for her in everyday life but she’s an analytical thinker. For example if she goes through a door and I’m pushing her brother in the stroller coming behind her she won’t hold the door, I have have to call out to her and tell her to hold the door and then she’s like ohhhhh. This happens often! I don’t know what to do about things like that, is that a common thing with APD? I’m working on getting her teachers info and getting her neurologist to add all of her needed accommodations to her 504 so that she can get the proper help. This is all new to me and I’m still learning but I’m determined. My daughter never really had close friends because from early on kids weren’t that nice. My daughter is really friendly and other kids would look at her like why are you so friendly/nice? Early on I had to teach her about what a true friend is and now if she sees that you don’t exhibit the behavior of a true friend she cuts you off. She currently has 2 or 3 good friends but she doesn’t really get to see/spend time with them. The teachers and dean tell me that she lacks social skills because she chooses to read instead of play at recess. She had 2 surgeries on her feet this year so she couldn’t run and play at recess but even if she could she would choose to sit and read most of the time. I don’t have a problem with that, reading is what she loves to do so I encourage it. When she wants to interact with others she does.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sandra,
I’m sorry your daughter is struggling in this way. We homeschool, and did before my son was even born, but his struggles make me even more glad that we do. There is no way he could comprehend oral instructions in a classroom of 25 or 30 other students. Even if they are aren’t all talking, there are other noises and such. Unlike your daughter, my son cannot read while there is a lot of noise. He has to go to his bedroom alone to do his reading every day.

One thing that helps my son when he is in more of a class setting is sitting in the front so that he can see the speaker’s face clearly. He can understand better if he can read the facial expressions and body language that accompany speech. Maybe that could help your daughter? The teacher should be aware that she needs to make eye contact with your daughter before beginning any instruction to her, and limiting the number of things she tells her to do at one time is important as well. If I want my son to do something I need to get his eyes, and then I give him no more than two step directions, do this and then do that. Having the child repeat back what you want her to do is very helpful at times too.

I hope you can work with the neurologist and the teacher to get her the accommodations she so clearly needs.

Tina Snowbarger

says:

I believe APD runs in both my family and my husbands. I appreciate this article which helps me to better understand how to teach and help my children.

Heather Chandler

says:

Thank you for this article. My 8 year old is struggling with reading right now and I think it might be Auditory processing disorder. I’ll start putting the tips you gave into action. Thanks for the great articles.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Heather,
Please let us know if you need any help. More than one of us here at AALP have personal experience with APD.

Maya

says:

My 8 year old daughter with Autism and APD just received her Amigo Star FM system for audio processing.
Can you plesse tell me your opinion on FM systems and how much it would be helpgull in class?
Thank you.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Maya,
I asked my co-worker and Marie, and none of us have direct experience with an FM system like this. However, anything that helps the student to hear the teacher more clearly, with less trouble with background noise, is likely to help. However, I have found my own APD student does much better when he is positioned near enough to the speaker to get a clear view of their face. His understanding increases when he can also read facial and body clues. That may be something to consider in addition to the FM system.

Please let us know how this system works out for your child! It would help us to be able to be more informed for others that ask about it in the future.

Melissa

says:

After reading this, I’m concerned my nearly 16yo son has a form of APD. He has presented many of these flags most of his life. We’ve always homeschooled, but I was just never sure and never knew what type of specialist could help. Is it too late too see someone about this to seek methods to improve?
Melissa

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melissa,
If you suspect that struggles related to auditory processing are affecting your son’s performance in school, or if he would benefit from accommodations, then it might be worthwhile to at least do a consultation with an audiologist. Accommodations for APD could included extended time or untimed for tests, or help with note-taking during lectures.

An audiologist could discuss strategies that your son could be doing for self-accomodation as well, such as making sure he can see a speaker, being aware of study surroundings that benefit or detract from learning, using noise cancelling headphones, and so on.

So, yes, even at this older age, consultation and/or testing could be helpful.

Brandi

says:

My daughter is 4 and hate loud noises such as toilets, hand and hair dryers, vacuum cleaners, and loud bass music. She covers her ears, screams, cries, and runs away from it, does this sound like auditory sensitivity to you? She has also show signs of adhd and spd but her doctor said its just anxiety yet he wrote down our family histories last visit.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Brandi,
Overreacting or fearing loud sounds is the first two symptoms on the auditory list of Red Flags for Sensory Processing Disorder. It may be worth looking into this further, even if it’s just to give you peace of mind.

Jerry Pay

says:

Today I began to view a movie with two of my grandchildren.One is 14 the other 12 both boys bright ans excelling in school.As the movie began the younger kept asking questions as though he couldn’t hear what was happening,to the point where I was ready to send him to another room.We couldn’t get it loud enough and I couldn’t set the CC .After the movie we had a lets talk about it session .I discovered he seemed to have missed much of the movie and needed much explanation.We talked and he revealed that he wanted CC most of the time but others objected .He revealed that he hated audio books and loved print (he is a voracious reader) all harry Potter and Lord of the Rings etc .As this conversation progressed I began to think back about times he is annoying with so many questions and what we felt was a feigned attempt to say he just didn’t understand .When his mother picked him up I related what he had said about CC and hating audio books in fourth grade .They were in private school ,but home school now .He tests very high in math and reading and retention that doesn’t seem to fit what I read online.After I began to read I stumbled onto ADP and much of what I read seemed to explain why my grandson acted the way he did at times .He seemed to require so much explanation and we joked he was a lawyer for sure .things seem to work together last night I watched an episode of the great race and there was a man on the show with his partner in the back seat giving him driving directions and he was completely at a loss his partner became completely apart at his inability to understand her directions –now I think I understand I can’t say for sure ,but I think my grandson has a bit of APD.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Interesting observations, Jerry. You may be right, although it would take testing to know for sure. Was the movie a particularly difficult one to follow, or was it a normal “just for fun” movie? If he is having trouble understanding regular movies, pursuing testing is probably very important. So much of what we do day to day involves understanding auditory information.

Hélène

says:

When speaking and the child doesnt catch it, dont try another wording, as is often suggested for neurotypical children; and often for APD, unfortunately. Say exactly the same thing so he can fill in the words he missed the first time. Say it a 3rd time if needed. If you change the wording, they have to start all over again trying to catch your words. They are hearing the whole thing each time, but only part gets processed. The rest is like “does not compute”. Just like pressing the button over and over on the website till it finally links you to the next page or site, APD just doesnt compute…way too often. TRY to remain patient and give the child a chance to not just take in, but compute. And a bit more time to decide on action. Or to use the computer parlance, take her the way she needs to go.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Hélène,
Thank you for this. I have found too, that sometimes I don’t have to repeat at all I just have to wait. It simply takes my son longer to process what I said, but he can process it when given time. Only after giving him time do I repeat if he needs me to do so.

Hélène

says:

My dd says what, huh, what did you say (or even worse, totally is unaware she’s part of a convo. This brain blow is completely random so every engagement…who knows? I would so love to blame it on tiredness or hunger or overstimulation, then I could prevent it)
As I was saying tho, she is very quick, like her 3 older sibs. Now, her younger sis; oh my, that child seems so dumb but she’s just slow. Smart as a whip and you’ll find this out if you give her time to respond. Their father stuttered and even as an adult, will repeat whole phrases while he gets the next phrase mentally formed. She did this till I trained her to stop verbalizing till she knew what she wanted to say, or say next.
Im very quick too so having to wait seems interminable with my youngest lol That kid is a deep thinker too but I didnt know till she was about 5!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Hélène,
Sounds like your daughter is one of those “still waters run deep” people!

Hélène

says:

4got to put that I used physical exercises with my youngest too, to help her be able to mentally organize herself quickly and then spit it out. Dianne Craft’s materials are excellent. Used them with APD/VPD dd also. It’s why she ever learnt to read. At all.
Amazingly she spoke and wrote well from the get go and was always advanced (like her sibs), followed multi task directions, paired CAPS with lowercase versions of letters at 3, always coordinated, agile, etc. As she aged her issues began. Very strange.

Sarah E

says:

Great information- thank you- I love the multi-sensory approach to reading!

Lisa Marie roberts

says:

Why do you need all about reading 2 and all about spelling? How do you use them both? Do you need both?

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lisa Marie,
All About Spelling (AAS) and All About Reading (AAR) both use a similar sequence and the same phonograms. Both are complete phonics programs, so they are interrelated in that way. AAS teaches words from the spelling angle, and AAR teaches words from the reading angle.

All About Reading includes research-based instruction in decoding skills, fluency, automaticity, comprehension, vocabulary and lots and lots of reading practice. AAS focuses instead on encoding skills, spelling rules and other strategies that help children become good spellers.

For example, in AAR 1, students learned 4 different phonograms that say /k/: c, k, ck, and ch. In AAS, they will learn how to know which one to use in a word; how do they know whether we spell cat with a C or a K? Or whether to end a word in K or CK? There are more than 250 ways to spell the 45 sounds in English; AAS systematically walks the student through the rules and other strategies that help them to become effective spellers.

For this reason, the programs are also independent of each other so students can move as quickly or as slowly as they need to with each skill. Kids generally move ahead more quickly in reading, and we don’t want to hold them back with the spelling.

For more information on the differences between reading and spelling, check out this article What’s the Difference Between All About Reading and All About Spelling? This article has samples of how the same concept is taught for reading and then for spelling, which might make some of the differences clearer.

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Erin Schwartz

says:

Dana,

I am a Deaf and Hard of Hearing teacher. I see many test results for CAPD/APD. A Speech Pathologist can screen your son, but an audiologist will have to administer the test. They, meaning an audiologist will not test a child younger than 6 and older (closer to age 8) is preferred due to the nature of the test. Keep up with the strategies for learning. I would start a journal as to the environments that appear the most problematic and the strategies that work. This will help him learn to identify how he can put himself in good learning situations and begin to advocate when he needs more support. Then you can provide great information to the audiologist when the test is administered.

Dana DeVries

says:

Hi! After reading this article, I’m wondering if my son may have APD. He is only 5 and we have begun AAR PreReading this fall. Would you happen to know how I could have him tested? Is 5 years old too early to diagnose? Thanks!
Dana =)

Colleen Schwenger

says:

Hi Dana! My 8-yr-old son was recently diagnosed by an audiologist. However, you do need to wait until a child is 7-8 years old to have the test performed. I was told before that they are still too immature and the results will be unreliable. Hope this helps!
Colleen

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Colleen,
Thank you for your input in this! I have heard of younger children being tested, but the unreliability of testing younger children does make sense.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Dana,
5 years old may not too early to have a child tested, as I’ve heard of testing as young as 3 or so. Typically, for insurance purposes, you will begin by seeing your child’s pediatrician or primary care provider. Let them know about your concerns and ask for a referral to an audiologist.

Monna

says:

It has taken over a year to get it working right on most days. My 10 year old 6th grade granddaughter, whom I home school, has severe APD and dysgraphia with some dyslexia. She is brilliant–completed 4th and 5th grade in one year, but cannot spell and has problems putting her thoughts down on paper or computer. She is in level 3 AAS and doing very well (this old English teacher has learned a lot also); she’s in level 2 of Susan Baeur’s Writing with Ease (helps her summarize and remember her thoughts to get them on paper); and except for Writing with Ease, does compositions with the help of Dragon Speech Recognition software. It has taken the 3 prongs working together for her to show improvement, and she has progressed so much. She doesn’t fight reading, or writing (writing is physically painful for her). We started with AAS and saw such a rapid improvement we started exploring other options to help her. There is some writing in AAS, but it was not focused on her needs so we found Writing with Ease. She has never complained that is “babyish” or too easy because she sees her own improvement. She now independently tries to sound out unfamiliar words, seldom asks how to spell something, and reads aloud without whining. We are still working on punctuation. When she was in public school, they focused on her speech (she has a lot of difficulty with ‘r’s” and hearing the difference between short i and short e. They ignored her processing disorder and her dysgraphia. We are now in the third year of home school and the worst threat her mother can make for her is to tell her she might have to go back to public school.

You families starting on this journey, good luck. Also, check into any Scottish Rite groups in your area. Their primary philanthropy is speech therapy and related disorders, such and APD and dyslexia. It is a free service.

Merry at AALP

says: Customer Service

What a great update on your granddaughter, Monna–congratulations on all her progress! You and she have worked hard, and it shows. Truly wonderful!

Monna

says:

When we started this journey, I had no idea what her problems were or how to address them. Thanks, Marie for your posts and your staff’s encouragement. Initially, I just thought she had problems with r’s, then she would cry when she had to write and I thought she just didn’t like to write–took me a while to understand she was in physical pain. Then we would discuss something in social studies or language arts and I would ask her to write it–her sentences were like a 5 year old, even using a word processing program. We tried her dictating to me and my writing/typing. That worked somewhat, but was frustrating to us both. In the meantime, we realized she had APD and dyslexia to slight degree. After working in AAS, and seeing her improvement, I went in search of other programs to help her. I am so proud of her–she can discuss her problems without embarrassment and tells people how we are working for her to improve. She hopes by her sharing, it will help others. She belongs to a girls youth group that has a lot of ritual work that she has to memorize. That is getting better with the work in all these areas. Thank you, Marie for your great programs.

Cheryl Escutia

says:

Thank you so much for this post! Now I know where to start with my daughter and why she just wasn’t “getting it” in most of her subjects. Thank you also for the All About Learning curriculum It has helped my two youngest daughters tremendously!

Lauri

says:

My two oldest children have both been diagnosed with dyslexia and I have heard that dyslexia is a language processing disorder. Is APD the same thing as dyslexia or is it something separate. My children definitely display many of the characteristics that you attribute to APD but I had just assumed that the struggles they have with speech, not being able to rhyme, etc. were due to the dyslexia.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lauri,
There are similarities between APD and dyslexia, but they are not the same. Many dyslexics learn better by auditory means, but a child with APD will struggle with information given orally, for example. Take a look at this Symptoms of Dyslexia Checklist, and see how it is quite different than the symptoms of APD given in this blog post.

It is possible to have both.

Please let us know if we can help you in any way.

Vikki

says:

My 12 yr old struggles with APD, but he reads very well and comprehension of what he reads is no problem unless it’s a vocabulary issue. However, if I say the same thing out loud, without using some sort of visual, he looks at me with a furrowed brow as he tries to process. He’s extremely good at math, and the piano was very easy for him because “well, I can SEE that, Mom”. He does have some speech delays that we are addressing now, and I’m wondering if that came about because he really didn’t hear (process) the family’s speech when he was a toddler. I will definitely put into practice some of the suggestions you made when speaking to him. Thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Vikki,
You are probably correct that your son’s speech issues are related to his APD. I know my 12 yo son with APD has struggled in speech in different ways, both with pronunciation issues and with syntax issues. My favorite is his tendency to count down instead of up. For example, when he means that he ate 3 or 4 pieces of pizza, he’ll say he ate 4 or 3 pieces. It is technically correct; there is no rule that says we have to count up in that way. But it sounds odd every time he does it.

Sandra Howard

says:

My daughter counts down too!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Good to know my son isn’t the only one, Sandra! It’s a year since I wrote the above, and he still counts down. Last week he was saying a new basketball would be twenty or fifteen dollars. I’m starting to think this quirk is one he will always have, and for some reason that makes me a little bit happy. I’m not sure why, but it’s probably some sort of nostalgia. He’s taller than me now, and I find myself getting nostalgic all the time thinking of my little man that is no longer little.

Melissa

says:

My 11 year old son says “um” a lot when he is talking. It interrupts his stories or whatever he is telling. Does that sound like auditory processing disorder or something else? He also says “what” frequently.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Melissa,
Saying “um” a lot when talking sounds more like he is processing his thoughts, has trouble with working memory, may have an expressive language problem, or he may just have a bad habit. Lots of people say um. It’s one of the first things public speaking classes work on. It’s hard for me to say what lies at the heart of the problem.

To work on his saying “um”, consider working on it at a certain time a day, or even as a school lesson. Ask him to slow down his speech, think about what he wants to say before he begins, take a deep breath, and try to speak smoothly without saying “um”. By working on it at a set time, you will avoid the frustration that can actually make it worse by trying to correct it every time he speaks.

In regards to saying “what” frequently, that could be auditory processing disorder, or it could be attention deficit disorder, or even something else. Again, it’s hard for me to say.

When you are speaking with him, you can try some of the tips in this article:
Make sure you have his attention.
Get down on his level.
Make sure he’s looking at you before you speak.
Slow down the pace of your speech just a bit.
and so on.

If he tends to get confused when you read aloud, slowing down that pace can help too. You may need to work on helping him to listen, stopping a bit more frequently to ask a question and see how he’s tracking can help.

I hope this helps at least a bit. Please let us know if we can help any further.

I hadn’t ever heard of this condition before. It sounds like it would be hard to know what to do if someone in your family had APD. It’s really helpful to know what things to look for when you think your child might have the condition. I also really like the tips about what you can do to help them, especially the one about speaking slowly and clearly. I’d imagine that that’s a pretty good place to start helping.

Monna

says:

I homeschool my granddaughter because her APD was not addressed in public schools and she struggled. She is brilliant. We started homeschooling in third grade in 2013 and she advanced to 5th grade just before Christmas, 2014. She struggles with spelling due to the APD, but looking at your spelling program, I cannot determine which level I would start for her greatest benefit. She reads fairly well, but misreads frequently and gains meaning from context. She also has severe dysgraphia with makes writing a struggle for her. She has been learning to keyboard so she can use the computer for composition. So now there are not big battles when she has to compose a paragraph or paper. We keep all of her written (entered vis computer) in a OneNote notebook. So far, that is working well for her. She is much happier being homeschooled with the individualized attention, quiet surroundings, speaking directly to her and looking at her. I give her no more than 2 instructions at a time unless I write them down. She is a joy to teach.

Shirley Yeo

says:

We LOVE AAS. Our son does have APD and we are using a special program called Little Giant Steps that you can check out online! :)
Hope it helps others

Karin

says:

My son has APD. For the past 2 years we have been seeing a speech and language pathologist (SLP) which has greatly helped. We tried All About Spelling, but it moved too quickly and he needed smaller informational pieces. We moved on to Barton Reading and Spelling. Surprisingly, the informational chunks were too much as well. What I have found is that any curriculum which has an Orton-Gillingham approach works for ADP and dyslexia; however, each curriculum must be presented in bite sized pieces small enough for the child to grasp. The SLP really helped me formulate the lessons into “chewable” sessions. I started with the “scripted lessons” and it was too much too soon. Then, I slowed the lessons down thinking that my informational amount was adequate, but learned that it wasn’t small enough. That was a learning process for me and I am still learning.

The information on this blog post is very consistent with ADP and useful. This type of curriculum coupled with a SLP or audiologist, who specializes with CAPD/APD would work well.

My final comment is although spelling may not be your child’s forte, he/she is amazing and gifted.

LINDA OWENS

says:

My grandson has APD and he is in fifth grade. He has been struggling in school in reading and spelling.
He can’t seem to comprehend what he is reading. Also, you cannot give him multiple instructions since he
gets confused so easily and frustrated. Is there anything I can do? Or should I have a tutor for him?
How can I make it easier for him. Help

Merry

says:

Hi Linda,

For instructions, try this:

First, make sure you have his full attention. If he’s sitting in the middle of all his legos, he will likely miss a lot of what you are saying. Call him and have him come to you. Put a gentle hand on his shoulder and get down to his eye level. Have him watch your mouth if needed. Give a short, single instruction, and have him repeat it back to you. Have him complete that task and then come back to see what’s next. For example, instead of, “brush your teeth and put on your pajamas,” you might simply say, “brush your teeth.” Then have him come back and you’ll next say, “put on your pajamas.”

For regular routines, you can even have a reference chart for him to use, possibly with pictures.

When it comes to reading and spelling, you could get a tutor or you could use All About Reading and All About Spelling. Many people have used these for kids with APD and other learning disabilities. AAR and AAS are designed to be open and go for parents who have no previous experience with teaching–so all of the needed help is built right in for you. Take a look at some of the online samples and see what you think.

Here are samples and scope and sequence links for All About Spelling Levels 1-7: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/spelling-lesson-samples

Here are the All About Reading samples and scope and sequence links for the various levels of the All About Reading program: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-lesson-samples/

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Phyllis Adee

says:

Dear Marie,

I thank you so very much for your program. My son felt that he could not learn to read or write during most of his school years k-2. Since kindergarten he was in special reading classes but they had their program that did not help him. His self esteem was destroyed. He was home schooled during 3rd grade, which is when I discovered your program.
He has finished AAS 1-2 and is currently working on level 3. He also finished level 3 AAR and I just ordered level 4. Can’t wait to start using it!! Both of your programs are like what Anne Sullivan was to Helen Keller.

God Bless

With this program he is more confident in his schoolwork

mimi mcgeary

says:

My son is 13 and has Down Syndrome and must also have APD. He needs simple language, the speaker must look directly at him, and use clear succinct speech. We do struggle in learning, and after reading your article, I believe he is a classic case.

Cara F

says:

Spelling is a struggle here.

Tiffany S.

says:

i am not sure yet if my dd has apd, adhd, or something else. i am looking for new things to try.

Alicia Hawkins

says:

My kiddo has other learning struggles that is why I’m excited to try your educational products this year.

Ari

says:

My children have other struggles besides APD including CP and severe language delay. AAS and AAR seem like the type of product that would really help them succeed.

Sabrina L.

says:

Interesting article

Chantal

says:

My son has sensory processing disorder and ADHD. He struggles with workbooks of any kind. I’ve found that adding in multisensory tasks helps tremendously. To get through a worksheet or two, I read to him from some of his favorite books while he works and then he is able to stay on task for linger spurts of time.

Meghan W

says:

We do not have APD in our homeschool, however my daughter is very sensitive to smells. She often feels like a smell is in her mouth, and wants to spit it out. It is almost like her senses are switched- taste and smell.

Hélène

says:

My oldest dd sees music and hears color. She is very smell sensitive too. She didnt know others couldnt see music or that colors didnt sing to them :0 Shes now 30 and is very gifted…in language and music. Never had a problem reading. Voraciously lol
So you never know :)

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Hélène
The official name for this is synesthesia. Many people have it to a small extent, such as seeing colored letters and numbers, like when someone always sees a certain color in response to a certain letter of the alphabet or number. H, for me, is always a nice kelly green while V is a dark red. Seeing music and hearing color is much more rare, and those that have synesthesia almost always report they would not get rid of it if they could. I can understand, as seeing music and hearing color would be awesome!

Rebecca

says:

Pretty sure one of sons has this. All About Reading has been great for him and we are getting ready to add All About Spelling. Excited to watch it open even more doors for him! Thank you for your wonderful products! They have helped my boys have confidence in what they are learning and being laid out the way they are has made it a slow, consistent and natural process for them.

We are still learning how to help our daughter and son who have apd. We just adopted them a little over a year ago and have learned to mostly adjust their instructional material to where they are developmentally and do lots of one on one work so we can better support their needs.

Aubrey

says:

What a tough challenge for kid and parent. Nice to have programs that can help.

KaraL

says:

No kids struggling with APD that I know of. My daughter really struggles with spelling. I would love to try this program!

Amber r

says:

So many struggle with this but do not realize it or how to handle it.

Amy

says:

My son struggles with APD as well as other issues. One of the hardest for us in swimming lessons. He just cannot hear when at the pool. So we had private lessons this year and it made a world of difference. Such a boost for him!

Suzy O.

says:

One of my sons shows some signs of APD this was a helpful article.

Kiesha R.

says:

I think providing a child with visual and auditory lessons will greatly enhance comprehension. Children learn in various ways finding what works best for your child is important. I homeschool now and have also taught school. I would love to try this program with my kids.

Ellen

says:

My daughter has APD and we use both AAS & AAR, looking forward to AAR Level 4!

Christina Marquez

says:

My daughter doesn’t have APD but we do the Pre- All About Reading and can’t wait to try the others!

raniah

says:

i struggle with keeping my child focused on the task at hand

Kaleigh Stultz

says:

So thankful for programs like AAR and AAS that help children learn, no matter their struggles- the sign of a quality program. We do not struggle with this particular disorder, but AAS has been a life-saver for all of us in this homeschool house.

Teri P.

says:

I just had my child tested for Auditory Processing Disorder and other Learning Disabilities. Though there has been no diagnosis, there is something that causes my child to struggle. I will continue to do everything I can to help my daughter achieve success in learning.

Tamara

says:

Very interesting. Never heard of it.

Stephanie Craig

says:

I have never heard of this before, but it looks like something I should look into for one of my children. Thanks for the info

Rachel

says:

I have one child that struggles with APD.

Sigrid

says:

Thanks for explaining some of the signs of APD. It is good to know what to look for. I think the recommendations were actually a good reminder for me for talking to my preschooler, since little ones also can need more time and demonstration to understand instructions.

Jaimie

says:

My child exhibits many of the signs of ADP, I would just think she is not listening to me and/or doesn’t want to do things, which is frustrating. Glad I read this article, I will need to look into this further. This will be our first year we will be using AAR and AAS.

Leslie G

says:

My son just turned 4 and I’m not sure if he has APD yet or if he’s just a 4 year old. He has a speech delay for articulation, so he speaks lots of words in sentences, just needs help making the right sounds. I appreciate that the giveaway encouraged reading this blog post. It is something I’ll keep in mind.

Clara

says:

Thank you for the give-away. I’m anxious to try your pre-reading program since my next child to start homeschooling is chomping at the bit.

Megan

says:

My daughter has sensory processing disorder. Due to insurance balking at paying for therapy and her development being mostly on track, we haven’t gotten thorough evaluations to determine if she has auditory issues in conjunction. I would love to use AAR and AAS with her

Brooke hart

says:

We don’t struggle with APD but we love AAR!! We are just getting started with back to school. My daughter has never liked learning to read but now she looks forward to AAR! Can’t wait to see how this school year progresses.

a daniels

says:

I love the AAR and AAS programs!

Ellen

says:

At first we thought our eldest son had ADD, but the symptoms really did not fit him for pure ADD when we changed his environments from noisy and busy to quiet and calm. Further testing showed the ADD symptoms were actually masking his symptoms and thus diagnosis of APD and SPD. Along with an ear filter made by our son’s pediatric audiologist (this filter helps his brain to hear), The All About Spelling program has taught our son how to spell very well with no stress and anxiety. The tiles give him a visual, colourful demonstration of the word and the short, clear and concise explanations support the tiles. We have tried other spelling programs and they failed (the tears were too much). This is the only spelling program our son asks to do. We do a lesson per week five days per week for 20 minutes or so and are now in AAS Level 3.

Jennie Sandidge

says:

We don’t struggle with APD but this was a great article to read anyway. We absolutely LOVE AAR and will be starting AAS Level 1 in just a few a weeks. We can’t wait to see how our child grows this next while using your products!

Great Article!! just started AAS 1 with my 7yo. He is flying through it, as most is review, but we, and we as in me too, have learned so much! I have decided to start AAR 3 with him soon. He is honestly a great reader, but he rushes through reading, and does not comprehend everything sometimes. I am hoping that AAR 3 will help slow him down, enjoy the journey, and learn to read with better comprehension! I am also about to start AAS 1 with my 10 year old dd. She is a struggling reader. She has a very hard time decoding multi syllable words. I have considered using AAR 4 with her when it is released. However, I thought that if I went through the AAS levels with her, it could help with decoding bigger words. I plan to blog all about our AAS/AAR adventures!
Oh.. and I will begin AAR 1 soon with my 5yo!! I am soooo excited! He already loves to “play” with the magnets, and I know this will be perfect for my little wiggly boy. I am happy that AAS and AAR is available to us… I sure wish I had this when my older 3 children were younger!! Thank you for writing a wonderful program!!

Stacy

says:

Wonderful article thank you!

Adrian N.

says:

We don’t struggle with APD, but we do struggle with staying focused on the job at hand and staying on task.

Kira

says:

We don’t have any APD issues that I know of but we do struggle to stay on track during the day and teaching the kids to be self-motivated. Working on it!

Kris B.

says:

I have a child with autism, not the same thing as APD but we face many challenges in our home education. I love the advice that other parents have to give that homeschool that has been a HUGE help.

JenWhite

says:

We don’t struggle with APD, we struggle with routine/schedule.

Danica

says:

Dyslexia. We have tried a few programs including LearningRX. But mostly we are just plugging away.

Heather

says:

My 7 year old daughter Down syndrome and we decided to homeschool after being in the public school for 4 years. She would be entering second grade this school year if still in public school, but she hasn’t mastered many kindergarten skills. We started using AAR 1 three months ago and she is finally starting to read! I can’t say she loves reading yet as it is difficult for her, but I am so proud of how far she has come in the short time we have been working together.

Yolanda

says:

Just starting kindergarten with our sin who has “provisional” diagnoses (multiple), I really like what I am reading about AAR.

Rose

says:

We don’t struggle with APD. We struggle with ADHD.

Donna

says:

I just purchases AAR pre-reading.

Anna

says:

This article was so eye opening for me. You described my son perfectly!! It’s really important for me to make sure my son is looking at me during our lessons. I have him repeat things back to me so I can make sure he’s processed what I’ve said. Thank you for your wonderful curriculum!!!

Sandi W

says:

One thing we struggle with in homeschooling right now is attitudes. My daughter gets really down on herself even if she just makes one little mistake. Frustrating cause I know how smart she is but she has a hard time seeing it.

Crystal Hatton

says:

I would sure love to win this! We love AAR & AAS!! :)

Cheryl C

says:

My daughter had struggled with speech delays in the past. There was more difficulty processing and comprehending what she read or heard and then getting it from her head to her speaking about it. It took time but ultimately it was by the grace of God that she has gotten better.
I had not heard of APD and am grateful for the info, thank you for sharing.

Melanie

says:

None of my 3 children have APD, but my middle son does struggle with speech – fails to enunciate words clearly and talks too fast. The combination can be challenging for the listener.

Jamie Threadgall

says:

My oldest son has had the hardest time learning how to read. I had him tested last year and we found out that he has delayed processing speed and a delayed working memory which both contribute to his dyslexia. We thought he might of had an auditory processing disorder, but he doesn’t. None the less, All About Reading has been been a life saver for us! He has made so much progress since we started using this program!

Kim

says:

I suspect my child may have CAPD and have scheduled testing for next month. Meanwhile, I have used All About Spelling Level 1.

Jennifer

says:

I have four boys and my oldest has hated learning to read. This program has changed our lives. Reading is still a change but he is so much more willing to try.

Jennifer Luffman

says:

Neither of my children have this that I’m aware of, but I do struggle to get them to focus on their work for more than a few minutes at a time.

Emma

says:

I’m not sure if my child might have this. I have been working on letters and sounds with him consistently for about a year and he still struggles to remember the sounds for the letters from one lesson to the next. But he does fine blending and segmenting words orally so he can distinguish the sounds. Just can’t remember which one for which letter. In any case I am planning to try AAR with him soon.

Nancy

says:

Not sure there is a name for what we struggle with our 7 year old. Regardless, we need help and would
love to see if this program would be a good fit for our son.

Dawn Doll

says:

My children do not have these issues, but we all benefit from AAR and AAS

crystal

says:

My children do not have this, but my oldest son has autism. All About Reading and All About Spelling has helped him so much!!

Misti

says:

My so has some apd symptoms. It’s so easy to break a lesson of AAR into mini lessons so as not to overwhelm, I love how the AAR2 has a page of words and phrases to warm up for reading a story. Builds confidence and makes for fluid reading.

Alice Herren

says:

My 5-year-old has a difficult time enunciating his “R’s” and generally is lazy with some of his speech. I am curious if All About Reading would help us in this area.

Michelle

says:

We don’t struggle with APD, but do like AAS for helping with dyslexia

Samantha

says:

Some struggles in our homeschool include SPD and ADHD.

Jennifer S.

says:

My children don’t have APD but my oldest daughter struggles with dyslexia. AAR and AAS has really helped her progress in her reading.

E. Walker

says:

We are not only a hearing impaired house, my oldest is aided, but my youngest has APD! He struggles the most in noisy environments, or places with background noise. We’ve learned to touch him and have him face us and make eye contact, however brief (he also has autism), so that we know he understands we’re trying to get his attention. We also through his speech therapist learned that consistent and constant repitition one of the best ways to get him to understand what we were saying. Often times, we would resort to picture cards as well to minimize his frustration with trying to communicate.

Kathy Sothman

says:

My daughter has dyslexia, and I’m still confused about how the APD and Dyslexia are the same/different. We are starting at the beginning and tackling this one day at a time.

heather wright

says:

None of my kids struggle with APD. I would say our biggest challenge is the two year old who wants to be a part of everything. She has her busy bags and toys but she really wants to do what her big sisters are doing.

Cherie

says:

Did Learning RX help your child? My grandson is doing it now. We were already using AAR and AAS Lev, 1. Also , Barton Reading. His reading is improving faster than is was. But has really learned a lot of sight words. since starting LRX. Which we don’t introduce until needed. He just turned 8 – 2nd grade. I hope all the sight words he has learned will not be a problem later. Any other LRX training?

Elisabeth

says:

I have two children who struggled with reading, but neither have this processing disorder. It was almost as if I was teaching phonics and they were blowing me off, sure that they already knew how, and learned whole language itself. AAS and AAR has helped a lot.

KelLee

says:

Most of my children seemed to practically teach themselves to read but not this last one. He definitely is having issues on reading and spelling. My goal this year is to do babysteps with him and work on helping him feel completely confident. This article really helped me by giving me pointers and things to look for which may be a problem.

Nicole

says:

My children do not suffer from APD but I would say the biggest struggle would be have a joyful attitude for all our subjects of the day not just our favorites!

Missy Staggers

says:

Thank you so much for this post! My son has dyslexia and is really having a hard time with reading and spelling. I have been considering AAR and AAS for him and after the advice from some other parents in the same situation have decided to give it a try :)

Daneale

says:

I have never had my son tested but I am sure he has ADP. He has been in speech therapy for years and also continued on to language therapy as well. AAR and AAS are honestly the only reason my child does things on grade level! Thank you for your wonderful program!

And I originally found you because my oldest is dyslexic :-) She used your spelling program and that actually taught her to read LOL (AAR wasn’t around when she was learning to read). And she is also at grade level as well. I know my kids wouldn’t be where they are if I had not bought your program. Thank you again.

HuiLung Yen

says:

I’ve heard a lot of good things about this program. My child is very good at spelling and loves the challenge. It will be great to find a program keep her challenged and interested.

LMD

says:

Looks like a great program! The biggest struggle in our homeschool is the preschooler! He does not have APD but issues that a hands-on, multi-sensory approach like this would fit well. He needs a fine balance of independence and assurance.

Aimee J

says:

So the strange thing is I have an APD but its been undiagnosed for years. I found that AAS helped me tremendously when I started using it with my son when he was in first grade. Now I’m excited to use AAR to help my daughter to learn to read.

Amanda

says:

I only learned about this disorder when I started homeschooling this year. I suspect my daughter has APD, but have not had any formal testing done yet

Nikki

says:

I suspect my daughter (and husband) has APD. They both act like they’ve heard me but later have no recollection that I spoke to them, let alone what I said. My daughter has trouble following more than 1 or 2 instructions. They both read very well, though.

Candace

says:

Thanks for all these tips. More for myself than my children. No APD, but these sure remind me to be patient with instructions and their response.

Jo

says:

A really helpful post – thank you
Yet another avenue we are looking into with our special needs kids…
Thank you

Brandie Granke

says:

My son loves the All About Spelling program precisely for its simple, short lessons. I didn’t realize that I was explaining and not showing enough until we started this program. It allowed me to understand the gaps in his reading comprehension as well as difficulties with following instructions. I found so much more insight into his “hearing” problems with this article. Thank you!

Stephanie Tygard

says:

We struggle with motivation often. Once we get started, we all love learning, but getting started is sometimes the problem.

Deanna

says:

Neither of my children have APD, but we are dealing with having a highly gifted/Aspergers child and a younger sibling.

thayer

says:

Looks like a great program- love the multi sensory options!

Anne-Marie

says:

I have not experienced this with my children, buy it looks like a very helpful tool!

Cathy

says:

I haven’t experienced APD yet with my children, but I have found All about Spelling to be helpful with my child who has some dyslexia

Brandi

says:

My children struggle with spelling, as we all know english words are not always spelled how they sound. I have been trying to find a curriculum to help them and this looks like it works. I have downloaded the app and love it.

I am currently awaiting appointments to have my son tested for sensory processing disorder and auditory processing disorder. I know he has hearing loss related to prematurity that affects his hearing but we want to ensure that he is tested all around so that I know how best to help him. A friend introduced us to the All About Spelling program. I am excited to try it to see if it works for us!

A

says:

We just brought our almost six year old daughter home from India a few months ago through international adoption. I’m homeschooling her in kindergarten this year along with my bio daughter in pre-k. Bio daughter is reading small words already, but we are obviously starting from scratch on language with our adoptive daughter. We know she has some sensory issues, and will have to see if anything like this or dyslexia crops up as well, but I am really hoping that a program like this would be great for both girls. I haven’t purchased AAR yet, but from everything I am hearing, this might be the answer I’m looking for to help her feel confident in her language development.

Alexandria Allen

says:

My child does not struggle with APD but he struggles a lot with letter recognition.

April

says:

I do not have any children with APD. But I have a child struggle to learn spelling

Alycia A

says:

My youngest is from China. She was adopted at 5 years old. We have had struggles with reading and spelling since she came home. She often asks me to repeat things, and has difficulty with sounding out words and the like. However, she mastered the English language in 5 months. She is dyslexic and uses glasses for reading.
I am using AAS 1 with her this year. I am praying that it will do the trick. Always interested in any tips that will help me help her learn.

Sara

says:

My son has a diagnosed LD and his SLP suspects that he may have APD. We have found that the multisensory program that AAS is has been so helpful. Thank you.

Deanna

says:

I do not have any children with APD. But I have had a child struggle to learn spelling, We have used many different programs. I wish I would have started him on AAS from the beginning.

Kendra

says:

Thank you for the tips! While I do not have any kids with ADP so far, we have a kindergartner and a preschooler still so if we ever need these tips, they seem great!

Teresa M.

says:

My child has not been diagnosed with ADP but he does has visual convergence issues that makes reading a struggle.

len D.

says:

My child does not have ADP but glad there are great resources for those that do.

Susan D.

says:

I am thankful this is something we have thus far not dealt with. But as a homeschooling mom, I am thankful for this information to better help me, my children, and fellow moms and their children.

Melissa Cherney

says:

I have one child with Sensory Processing Disorder. He was severely speech delayed and for a while was showing signs of Auditory Processing issues. Both have since mostly resolved, but have left him really emotionally “immature” for his age. He’s smart as a whip, but often behaves a full 2 years younger than he truly is. I am glad that we’re homeschooling because this will let him mature as he is ready. I think the AAR/AAS multi sensory approach will be a huge help to get and keep him interested in learning to read.

Julie K.

says:

My son used to drop some consonants, like he didn’t hear them in the word: welcome he spelled wecome. Using AAS fixed that, and fixed it easily! Using the tiles and touching those letters while sounding out words in Level 1 did it for him. He’s always been a great reader, and now he’s also a great speller!

Nancy Clark

says:

My 7 yr old son struggles with speech and spelling, he is easily distracted and very active.

Teresa

says:

Thanks so much for this info! :-)

Karra

says:

Our struggle is with personality clashing. I have a spirited little one who only likes to do things her way and at her time. Teaching her is a challenge and we are trying to figure out how to meet her needs without crushing her spirit

Rebecca

says:

Our struggle is not with APD but I do have a struggling speller. I am always looking for ways to help her improve on, what is a frustratingly difficult skill. Thanks!

Kendra

says:

Our son has apraxia of speech and will most likely have a difficult time with spelling, reading, and writing. He is 3 now, so I’d love to get him started with these resources at such an early age before we run into problems with language!

Txnmama

says:

My children are not showing signs of APD, but I feel all children can benefit from more auditory processing activities. I think especially because they receive so much visually, auditory processing activities/development can help balance things out. I’m glad to hear there is homeschool curriculum that is considering a spectrum of learning challenges that home educators are tackling sometimes with little/no support.

no APD here, but we do have ADHD, which carries a similar issue.

I am nearly in tears after reading through this. I just came by for the giveaway, and was going to comment that I suspect one of my four boys has APD, but he is not diagnosed. I also suspect he has SPD and that he is on the spectrum somewhere. Anyway, just reading this gave me a bit more hope that he’s going to be okay because he has parents who love him and won’t give up on him.
Thanks! <3

Kendra Ahlborn

says:

Jenn, I’m so thankful that this blog post happened to be some much-needed hope on your part! I’m sorry you were in tears, but it sounds like they were really good tears! If you don’t mind me saying, your son is beyond fortunate to have parents that will never give up on his schooling!

Kati

says:

My children do not have ADP, but found the post very informative.

Corrinn

says:

I think choosing what is best to spend time on and what is just fluff is the most difficult thing for us right now.

Kim

says:

My son does not have ADP but I appreciate all the information, very helpful!

Rebecca

says:

My DD was not diagnosed with APD, but these are still great tips for helping her in that she is a more quiet person who can benefit from clear explanations and having her watch my lips. Thanks for the tips!

KDGE

says:

My son never understood phonics and it was many years before I heard about this and then it all made sense! Thanks for what you are doing to educate people with this valuable information.

Susan P

says:

Thank you for some valuable information!

Heather Vogt

says:

My son has always struggled with reading. He is currently in vision therapy, and they have suspected a visual processing disorder. Recently, the doctor mentioned the possibility of an auditory processing disorder as well, so when I saw this post, I was eager to learn more about it. Thank you!

Brittany

says:

Our biggest struggle in homeschool is managing several children at different levels.
One of which still struggles to read and he’s almost 9. AAR has helped tremendously!

Jenn

says:

My son has spina bifida with hydrocephalus. He has been tested as having hyper acousis – extra sensitive hearing. Because of this he has trouble with crowd noises – they’re too loud for him. He used to have panic attacks in crowds quite frequently. At 13, he still does get anxious and sometimes panicky but he is better able to deal with it than when he was younger. He seems to be just the opposite of what Marie has described above – he has a defensive response to auditory input. He goes into “fight or flight” mode when faced with excessive auditory input – unless he can control it – like with a volume knob or remote control. However, thankfully, we’ve found that his auditory learning skills are excellent. For example, he can hear a song once or twice and be able to repeat a large portion of the lyrics. I’ve learned to use this in his education to help him with skills that are hard – such as finding songs for his times tables on YouTube. We’ve loved the AAS curriculum for my son, and are looking forward to getting into the 3rd level this year!

Amanda B

says:

My daughter doesn’t have APD but she has other special needs. Thanks for the helpful tips that we can incorporate into our day!!

Donna

says:

When my daughter was 2 she would bolt in a parking lot when a car engine started and then crumple in a heap of tears. We could not attend musical concerts or movies, or even a church with a big speaker system. She would cover her ears and cry. Those are just a few examples. She just turned 21 and she loves going to movies, plays, concerts, etc. and many of those things are simply not an issue. I believe a lot of it is just from learning that they weren’t as scary as they sounded. She still goes silent when in a group because she can’t process all the parts of conversation, and her speech is slow and halting. But she’s proud of the progress she’s made.

Nancy

says:

Great post! I am going to pass this on!

Cindy DeMass

says:

I’ve just recently recognized our son has APD. His lack of interest in reading and very poor spelling I had
figured was due to immaturity and/or just simply being an active boy. Now that his two younger sisters have
surpassed him in both reading and writing….I’m finally seeing that he is actually struggling. I feel absolutely
terrible about not catching this sooner! He’s a very sensitive and cooperative child…but hates school. I need
to help him become successful and give him the tools to learn and increase his comprehension! Your program looks like it would be just the right thing.

Melissa

says:

We don’t have this disorder, but my middle daughter did struggle with spelling and being consistent. Since we’ve been using All About Spelling, she is more consistent & confident. I am now using the program with my six year-old son who loves it. The tiles really make sense for a tactile learner.

Robin

says:

A great article. We haven’t had these problems, but my daughter has been having great success with AAS and AAR.

Emily

says:

What an informative article. We don’t struggle with this particular issue, but spelling has just cropped up on our radar which has brought me to your site!

Leighanne

says:

Awesome article. My children don’t have APD, but they do have trouble focusing when they aren’t interested. I homeschool them and I have found that they learn the best with hands on materials, and fun interactive activities.

So lucky my little guy hasn’t had any learning problems! I think it is amazing how many mothers work so hard to make the best life for their little ones! Wish I were able to homeschool full time, in the meantime I’m happy with our AAS program to help supplement!

Marilee

says:

This article made me cry! I’m pretty sure I have APD but never knew it. Now I see the same struggles in my 7-yr-old which breaks my heart. However, because of AAS I have so much hope for her. She has completed Levels 1 and 2 and spells 100 times better than I did at her age. Oh how I wish I’d had AAS and AAR when I was growing up, but I’m so thankful my daughter has AAS.

Mara

says:

Thanks – another great article, as always! This is definitely something that we struggle with here.

Shari R

says:

I have been using AAS and AAR for this past year and my dyslexic son(10) is loving it and my dyslexic daughter(13) is tolerating it. My daughter just feels like it is so young but doesnt mind because is learning and likes the colors and movement. I just found out that my son has APD at the beginning of the summer. I think that this AAS and AAR is a big reason for his improvement this year.
Here is one thing I would add to the list and that is not just backing up to a more comfortable place in the lesson but when you see a meltdown coming I stop and choose to do jumping jacks, trampoline, jump rope, body twisting stretches, pushups, or handstands. After 5 minutes of activity we will then go back to the comfortable spot in the lesson and usually have much better concentration. We also start reading with any of these activities.

Jenni N

says:

My child does not have APD, but SPD. We modify learning environment and use lots on hands on materials that he can physically move around. Thanks.

Payge

says:

Receiving my order on Tuesday. Very hopeful it’ll help my kids.

Julie

says:

Great article. Love what you products have done for my dyslexic child so far!

Jenny

says:

Thanks for the article. I’ve got one that is an auditory learner(8) and another that really struggles on the auditory side(4). This was very helpful!

Lori Martinez

says:

I don’t have a child with APD, but this article offers good information for people who weren’t aware of it. This is my first year homeschooling, praying for guidance and support along the way.

Miriam

says:

We do not have any children with APD so far, but I was terrified of teaching spelling to my children. This was a subject that I basically failed my entire life. If not for spell check I probably wouldn’t have made it to college. I have loved AAS and AAR. I am finally learning to spell! My children love the activities and the flash cards help so much with knowing rules and keeping the words we have learned in constant practice!

Tina

says:

My child does not have APD, but we did have a little trouble with learning the rules of spelling. I simply slowed the lessons down, reminded myself that there was no time limit, and let him learn each rule well before we moved on. Now he spells like a champ!

Jennifer

says:

I’ve started using AAR and will start AAS soon with my daughter who is dyslexic. She was made great strides with it and I am so thankful for this program. She hasn’t been tested yet for APD but I believe it’s an issue for her. I’ve been making an effort to simplify directions and offer more “lag” time between asking questions and expecting an answer and have found both of us to be less frustrated.

Jess

says:

I have a child that cannot sit still for more than a few minutes….this program is perfect for her. It is very hands on and keeps her busy so she can pay attention

Cara

says:

Thank you for addressing APD! I was diagnosed with this myself when I was 10 years old and am now raising a child with the same struggles. She is a bright girl and very sensitive to the fact that she learns differently than her siblings and friends. All About Spelling and All About Reading have been the first curriculums that she has been excited to use! The biggest blessing since starting AAS/ AAR- she WANTS to check out books at the library and read FOR FUN! Thank you!

Mia

says:

We don’t struggle with apd, but the lessons in AAS have really helped my sons to understand the basics of spelling and ALL the sounds the vowels make from the very beginning. Great foundational information.

Janice

says:

My son has severe APD (plus apraxia and non-verbal autism); he doesn’t have hearing loss. He is mostly communicatively non-verbal but is somewhat echolalic; however, he generally can’t vocalize entire words (even if he is just echoing them), much less sentences. But he can sing some songs. With his apraxia, he can’t sing well, but the amazing thing is that so much more vocalization comes out when he is singing than he can get out when he is talking. I don’t know if he can understand language better if it is sung or not, but it would not surprise me if that was the case.

Jessica Y. Kirdyashev

says:

I try to make it a point to make my son look at me when I am talking to him. I also try to touch him when I talk to him and have learned the hard way to give instructions/steps one or two (maximum) at a time. Have also purchased the Dianne Craft “Brain Integration Therapy Manual” and have tried to adopt exercises specific to APD.

Tracy

says:

Our middle child has adp disorder. This is such a great informational blog. Thank you

Lindsie

says:

Our youngest son struggles with Auditory processing. Glad for these tips!

Jamie

says:

My children do not have APD but some of the communication tips offered above are excellent reminders that even if a child does not have APD it is always helpful to slow down and be sure that they are understanding. Thank you for sharing!

Brenda F.

says:

My children don’t have APD, but one struggle we do have is mixing up the E and I sounds. We live in the south so I imagine that is why. Your spelling program has been a great help! My daughter is actually enjoying spelling! I’ve even seen improvements in reading comprehension!
Thank you for creating this program!

Laurie Smith

says:

I don’t have any personal experience with APD, but I know how the multi-sensory approach to All About Reading has really helped my son. He has trouble focusing, but the games really draw us in.

Lacey

says:

We don’t have any personal experience with APD, but I found your information to be highly informative and something that might be useful to share with someone else at some point in the future. Thank you for sharing!

Karen

says:

I suspect that my son may have an APD. This information was very helpful. :)
Karen

Anne L

says:

I have a 16 year old daughter who has always struggled with school due to ADHD and APD issues– — scores low on spelling and reading — I started homeschooling in January after a difficult first semester of high school – everyone told me to use AAS but stubborn me — I resisted because I was afraid she would find it too juvenile and not like it but after re testing her and finding her exactly where we were six months ago — the young sales clerk at the home school store used it when she was 15 — through 18 – and really felt it helped her make huge improvement in spelling — so I dusted off my AAS and started this week at ground 0 level 1 phonics and to my dismay she LOVES IT and ASKS to do her SOUNDS and AAS. I am shocked at how few sounds she knows, how much she was reading by sight and memorization and not by phonetics — and how much she has learned in one week !! I write all this to encourage parents of older teenagers – Thank you so much Ms Rippel ! You are the answer to our prayers !!

Merry

says:

Hi Anne,

I’m so glad it’s helping! If it makes you feel any better, I waited nearly a year to try AAS with my son! (obviously, that was before I started working for AALP!) No sense looking back, just keep looking ahead and working through at her pace. Older students are sometimes able to fast-track through some of the steps, so if you find that she has words memorized in some steps, you can pick up the pace to match her needs, and then slow down again in steps that are harder. Here is an article with more information on how to “fast-track.”

http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/using-all-about-spelling-with-older-students/

Lynn

says:

Very informative. Thank you for the article

NGreene

says:

We have just recently discovered our son is dyslexic. Out of all the different symptoms, the auditory processing issues seem to be the most troublesome for him. This will be the first school year that we will be addressing these specific issues with programs/activities/exercises designed to tackle these problems. AAR and AAS are some of our key components. We haven’t gotten the AAR yet, so winning the gift certificate would be so helpful!

Becky Thompson

says:

My son stutters when trying to get out what he’s trying to say. He just turned 11 and is reading on a 3rd grade level. His eye tracking seems poor. He gets frustrated easily. I let him pick out books he’s interested in to read. He will a lot of times reverse letters around to say was instead of saw, etc. He will sometimes forget a word in a sentence that he just read in a previous sentence. His comprehension is not too bad depending how long it takes him to read a sentence, paragraph, etc. He needs a curriculum where he doesn’t get so frustrated and learning can be fun. Plus he needs something where his reading can take off.

Deborah

says:

This is so timely! I feel it’s as if God is saying, “Yes, you know your child!” I am in the beginning of homeschooling my 4-year old son and for the last year I have often said something like, “His brain and his mouth aren’t talking to each other,” but I never knew there was an official term for it. He was in speech therapy twice a week through our school district last year and he will be again this year. I did mention this to his therapist, but now I will mention it again first thing this year and see if we can get him tested for it. His hearing is perfect, he has been tested for OT through a private doctor and will be tested again through the school district once the school year starts, and he has been tested and received OT for sensory processing issues.

All this to sa, that I have never felt that we have “hit the nail on the head” and it does make teaching him much more of a challenge. But now, I hope I have hope. Thank you for a great article!

Becky Thompson

says:

My son stutters when trying to get out what he trying to say. He just turned 11 and is reading on a 3rd grade level. His eye tracking seems poor. He gets frustrated easily. I let him pick out books he’s interested in to read. He will a lot of times reverse letters around to say was instead of saw, etc. He will sometimes forget a word in a sentence that he just read in a previous sentence. His comprehension is not too bad depending how long it takes him to read a sentence, paragraph, etc. He needs a curriculum where he doesn’t get so frustrated and learning can be fun. Plus he needs something where his reading can take off.

Shelly

says:

My son does not have APD. We will begin 1st grade this school year. His struggle so far has just been his frustration when he doesn’t instantly know something and/or isn’t instantly perfect at it.

N

says:

My sons do not have APD but my oldest struggles with staying focused and is having a hard time with critical thinking, especially with word problems. I’m not sure if it is the steps or if its a comprehension issue. This is our first year homeschooling full-time and with both children and I hope I can help build his confidence and help him with it because he’s discouraged.

Kathy

says:

Very enlightening apd article. I see some of these symptoms in my grandson who has been diagnosed with autism. Waiting for level 4 to come out.

Lori

says:

My story is a bit different than many as my daughter was an auditory learner her entire life. Then, suddenly all of that changed when she was involved in a very serious car accident. She suffered a traumatic brain injury, which left her with many challenges, including Auditory Processing Disorder. I was amazed at all we learned through our journey during the following year. While there are still many things that are not “fixed,” the APD is MUCH better. She will probably never again be an auditory learner, but she is able to learn and communicate and understand and “keep up” in conversation, instructional settings, etc. Most of the time, she can find the words she is looking for quickly and can respond to conversations even when multiple conversations are occurring simultaneously or when there are many distractions.

One of the many tools that we found helpful was to spend 5 to 15 minutes a day (depending on the success and the brain function of the day) with me reading short paragraphs and then asking my daughter 5 specific questions about the paragraph. Originally, our speech therapist gave us a book with planned activities. The paragraphs in the book were followed by multiple-choice questions at the easiest level and progressed to a level where my daughter had to supply the answer on her own. We also practiced conversations. I would tell her a topic and then she would converse with me for a while about that (3 to 5 minutes in the beginning). As we progressed, we moved to a point where I would read a short excerpt or paragraph to my daughter and then she would write down all she remembered about what was read. The activities really focused her brain and allowed it to create new pathways and strengthen unbroken old ones. This is a bit tedious, but the payoff was tremendous.

Another resource that I love for working with children with Auditory Processing Disorder is a book by Jerome Rosner called Helping Children Overcome Learning Difficulties. The book has lots of activities to use to strengthen auditory processing and overcome some of the deficits.

Joni A

says:

I love your ideas! My son was born with high functioning autism. He’s actually very sociable – and not so far off in social skills that he can’t play well with peers… but he does struggle significantly with auditory processing. We have done much of what you described… step by step creating new pathways. You are right… it is tedious, but so worth it! My son excels academically now, but there continue to be challenges. Coming into his pre-teen years, I am running into new ones. Your conversation idea is wonderful! He converses fine in areas he is familiar with, but it is difficult to move beyond that. I am going to start with 3-5 minute conversations, picking less familiar territory and have him learn to carry a conversation. It’s perhaps a very different purpose than what you are doing, but I think it may the key I’ve been looking for. Thanks!

Ashley

says:

We love All About Spelling. My son has been diagnosed with APD, and was spelling on a Kindergarten level when we began homeschooling him last year for the 3rd grade. We started with Level 1 just to go back and make sure we had the proper foundation, and didn’t miss a step. He was able to go through the first two levels rather quickly, and is on his way to being back on grade level now. I was thrilled to get the email today that All About Spelling 4 is going to be out soon! Perfect timing. Thank you for posting about the learning disability. We are eager to learn as much as we can to help the kids be as successful as possible.

Stephanie

says:

I’ve been trying to find proper help for my son’s APD. Where we live, there aren’t any physicians or clinics that evaluate and/or diagnose, let alone treat. I try to do as much as I can for him. Learning to read has been one of the most challenging things. Despite the APD, he is an auditory learner, kinesthetic too. He has severe ocular-motor dysfunction on top of APD. So, the physical visual mechanics of reading, along with having such a hard time distinguishing sounds (vowels, p/b/v, f/th) and syllables, have really put him behind. I would like to use both AAR and AAS with him (he’s a third grader). He can read to an extent, but I’m just not sure which AAR level is appropriate. He can do many things on both Pre-Reading and Level 1 checklists, but not all, and not with proficiency.

Merry

says:

Hi Stephanie,

I’ll drop you an email and we can discuss which level might be best.

Trenna Kelley

says:

we are just finding out our 3 yr old has apd, so we are new to this. this is going to be very helpful. timely too!!

KAREN

says:

Wow. This is the first I’ve heard of APD. After reading about it, I don’t believe my son struggles with it. However, he gets terribly frustrated with ADHD with which he has been diagnosed. He turned 6 in April, and is beginning the 3rd grade, as he was also diagnosed to be gifted (superior). I feel equally frustrated as I teach to his intellectual ability, while the ADHD tries to hold us back (Here come the tears). Because of this I come across as a tough homeschool teacher at times. I want him to love school. He deserves it. Multi-sensory AAR AND AAS are perfect for him and me. We love everything about them. Thank you. We also use multi-sensory Math-U-See which we also love very much.

Dorothy Helmth

says:

I have a child that struggles a lot with reading.I am looking into it more ( searching) for answers this year.I recently found out some of her cousins have sun scoptic syndrem so am looking to see if that may be the problem.Was wondering if know anything about that and if this program would help.

Merry

says:

Hi Dorothy,

Yes, a lot of children who have struggled with various vision processing issues have been helped by All About Reading and All About Spelling. Here’s a blog review about one family’s journey that might interest you: http://allisvisiontherapystory.blogspot.com/2014/04/all-about-reading-key-to-success.html (this is one article, but you can read all about their journey on her blog).

Christa

says:

My son has never been formally diagnosed, but fits all the “symptoms”. Learning is much slower, but it is very doable. Hang in there mamas. My son is now in the 5th grade, we’ve homeschooled him the whole way through and plan to graduate him, as well. There are so many wonderful products, AAS and AAR are one example. Just be patient, hang in there, and know that learning happens at the child’s pace, not the pace of the scope and sequence of a school district.

Carrie Gutwein

says:

We love All About Reading and AAS! My son, 8 1/2, has finally discovered that he LOVES to read this summer! He has struggled with Sensory Processing Disorder and Attachment issues for several years and are a little over halfway through AAR Level 3 and AAS Level 2. Thank you!!

Lynn Medley

says:

Thanks for the information

My kids don’t have APD, but that doesn’t mean we’re without trouble of course. In our classroom, the little 2 1/2 year old sister is the biggest challenge because she’s mommy’s shadow and doesn’t like her big brothers getting attention. My two sons are using AAS 1 and 4 and we love it!

Bridget

says:

As a new teacher, this interests me. What a great resource to assist my future APD students.

I have found with my son flashcards are the way to go. It gives short pieces of information for him to work on without being overwhelming. Comprehension is still a big struggle. Memory is so hard for him. This program might work. Any thoughts?

Merry

says:

He’ll be right at home with AAR and AAS–both programs include flash cards so that you can customize the review and do as little or as much as your student needs to master the material. Multi-sensory methods help kids take in information in a variety of ways, which also helps retention–and we provide multiple other methods to review material in both our reading and spelling programs.

Marie did a series of newsletters on kids and memory issues–you might want to check our archives: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/newsletter-archive/

You’ll find lots of helpful articles, but especially check out # 14, 15, 16, 17, and 19.

Heather L

says:

Though my children don’t have APD, they require more visual cues to be successful with their schoolwork. I appreciate the multisensory approach of AAR and AAS.

Theresa

says:

As a pediatric OT, I have used some of your preschool materials in the clinic and find them to be very engaging for my patients. My own 2 middle schoolers struggle with spelling, so I would like to look into your spelling program more.

Rebecca

says:

I love this program!!!

gail shepherd

says:

There are too many interruptions during the day. Family in and out asking what seems to be necessary questions.Would like a separate location.

Rebekah

says:

My oldest son has APD, and so does his father. I suspected this disorder from the time he was about 5 years old, all because of some reading I’d done when my husband was told by an audiologist that they thought he had APD. But I couldn’t seem to go through the right loops to get clinical testing and diagnoses for my son. I homeschooled in kindergarten, but had to put him in school for 1st grade. The teacher quickly told me he had ADD and needed to be put on medication. When I told her it was APD, she didn’t know what I was talking about and said he’d need to have that on an IEP for it to be considered. Which was extremely frustrating because, as I’d try to explain, if he had ADD, then when you speak to him , he wouldn’t notice. But he’d always respond immediately, saying ” what?”, at which I’d repeat what I had said. This would go back and forth 3 or 4 times before he’d understand. And yes, in group setting with background noise in was just impossible for him to filter out the noise and comprehend what was being shared. It was a long 4 years before he finally got the diagnoses, and he had it severely. Testing divided it into 12 areas that can be affected. If the child has more than 4, they are considered severe. He had 6 areas. Even after testing, I could still never get help for him. I should add that part of our struggles was, we were limited to what we could get insurance to cover for testing, as my husband is physically disabled, and our income’s very low. It never wanted to cover the tests I knew he needed, but would always have him do some other test. They’d always come back, simply saying he had a learning disability which affected the “working memory”, causing problems with spelling and math. APD also effects math, as the brain can’t hold onto the information that’s already been solved, while you work on the next step. They also find it very difficult to memorize math facts, as the brain just doesn’t seem to store that information, although the conceptual understanding was always excellent for him. I took my son out of public school during 2nd grade, as he was getting further and further behind, and it was really affecting his self-esteem. He was convinced he was dumb, although IQ testing had shown that he was very bright, and also showed that he had a learning disability. It was 3 frustrating years of trying out different spelling curriculum, all with negligible gains, before finally stumbling across All About Spelling. In the year and a half we have been using it, he has made EXCELLENT progress. I’m sure that in another year, he’ll be up to grade level for spelling. What a relief!!! My son also had dysgraphia, which I could never get diagnosed, until I found Dianne Craft’s WONDERFUL book, “Brain Integration Manual”, which I also highly recommend. The website is under her name. She had exercises that corrected this “disability”. This book also has a section on diagnosing APD, and exercises that help re-mediate APD, but it does say that it takes longer than the other areas. Every parent should have this book, BEFORE your child starts school. There are many symptoms you can watch out for even during toddler years that point to a possible future learning disability. AND, remedial exercises that can keep them from ever having to experience these frustrations! If only I’d known. About all I can do now is promise to help other people, so they don’t have to go through the things I’ve had to figure out on my own. It’s been a very lonely journey. I’m considering being a teacher for children with special needs and learning disabilities one day. All About Spelling, and Dianne Craft’s “Brain Integration Manual” are two diamonds that I know will work miracles for a lot of children out there. I forgot to mention, my youngest son has Autism, and these two resources have been a world of help for him, also. Hope this information helps someone out there! Looking forward to starting Level 4, and a $100 gift certificate certainly would help out financially!

Merry

says:

Thanks for sharing your journey, Rebekah! It certainly does seem like there should be easier ways to get the help that kids need.

Julie Jones

says:

We are new to the all about learning program and even though I do not have any children who struggle with APD, I have been looking for a program to help two of my older children who struggle with Spelling, and I believe I have finally found a product!! It was especially helpful to look at each level as a stepping stone to the next (not as a grade, as my older children hate it when they are working well below grade level by the grade level written all over the text) I told them (as suggested by the curriculum) to look at it like a video game, everyone starts at level one!

alison

says:

This is a very helpful article. Thank you!

Carla

says:

My daughter has APD. We use a personal FM system as of now.

Cynthia

says:

After reading this article I’m starting to wonder if this is why my son is struggling with. I am going to try these tips and see if they work and speak with his pediatrician about getting him tested. Thank you for posting this article since I hadn’t heard of this before.

Rebecca

says:

While never official diagnosed, at least one of my children and I have learned this is something we deal with. Because both my child and I are older, we have learned coping mechanisms and adapted in many ways. It has been nice to learn that there is a reason for us being the way we are though:) It also helps us be more observant with the younger children and more compassionate with others.

Ayrielle

says:

I am starting to think that my son has APD. It would be another addition to the “alphabet soup” he is already diagnosed with. He hasn’t struggled to learn to read and thanks to AAS he is spelling really well, but it is other areas where I notice he is having troubles in regards to APD.

Christina Williams

says:

This is what my oldest son struggles with, I am looking forward to see how well he does with the All About Spelling lessons this year.

Christy

says:

My daughter suffers with dyslexia and auditory issues. Using these programs has helped her greatly.

Jennifer Clark

says:

This is great information. I have three children, and two of the three have signs of APD. The third is too young to tell at this point. My oldest was able to compensate on his own and is very advanced. My second child needed a little extra help. We went through different curricula, and stopped when we found AAR and AAS. It has been helping her tremendously. She went from being unable to read to reading chapter books in one year! Spelling is still a struggle, but we are making progress. The tips you provide are wonderful. Speech issues and #9 on your list are our biggest concerns at this point. : )

Monique B

says:

We struggle with time management and attention issues.

Mandy

says:

I started homeschooling my then 5 year old daughter last year, she really has shown no interest in learning to read. I am getting ready to order the Pre Reading program in the hopes she will be more open to it. I think the fact that her 3 year old baby sister is excited to learn will give her the little push she is needing :)

Ashley

says:

We’re about to start preschool! No struggles yet.

Jaime B

says:

My oldest struggles with math. We use a math program similar to AAR and AAS, which is a big help, but I realized that her continuing struggle is because we tend to do long lessons sometimes only twice a week (because she enjoys it!) instead of short lessons everyday. Her retention has been spotty. One day she would snap right to it and other days I found myself looking at her like “have you been present for the last 5 lessons on this same topic? ” :) I am now setting the timer for 15 minutes to allow us to get to our other subjects and she is thriving.

Jolene

says:

I would love to know the Math program you use?
Jolene

Noelle

says:

We do not struggle with APD at our house. We are just struggling with the normal b and d mix up and saying our ‘L’ words with a ‘Y’ sound. Two things I think the girls will grow out of.

Cheryl Nelson

says:

Our eldest has this disorder. She was diagnosed by a private clinic. This is order many times is accompanied with other difficulties, ie dyslexia, autism, etc. How it was explained to me by a speech therapist was that the speed by which her mind processed sounds (mega hertz) was either too slow, or too fast as you explained in your article. She recommended sound therapy. There are two programs she recommended. Sonomas or the program that is marketed by Advanced Brain Technology. We went with ABT. She said if things were going to change it would happen within 4-5 weeks. Well within 4 weeks our quiet daughter began to converse with me, it was as if her whole world changed. She still doesn’t like large crowds however, her tolerance for them improved. When I look back to my journey with her….I am so grateful for all the answered prayers. I am a credentialed teacher of 12 years that was lead to homeschool our 3. Little did I know how really ill prepared I was to do that task. But how faithful God has been:-). AND yes… Love your product. Has been a huge blessing for our youngest.

Brandy

says:

Our daughter was just diagnosed with APD this past week. I looked at the website for ABT and would love to talk to you more about this if you are willing. My email is pancoast@theofficenet.com. I am a homeschooling mom of 6, have three deaf children beside the APD daughter and have a private music school so this approach definitely interests me on many levels.

Thanks,
Brandy

Merry

says:

Absolutely! Please feel free to email any time. I’ll drop you an email. Merry :-)

Merry

says:

Hi Cheryl,

So exciting to hear about your progress! I hope you and Brandy are able to connect.

Jessenia

says:

Just this week I took my son (8) in for a hearing screening because lately he would say that he could not understand/hear what I was saying. He passed the screening, but now I wonder if the issue may be all together something else. He still struggles with reading and spelling. I don’t think he has a speech delay, but still at 8 years old, he sometimes struggles with explaining himself and getting his words out. It’s like he has a hard time finding the right words to communicate what he wants to say. Your article makes me wonder is my gut feeling requires more research for his benefit. Thank you.

Alex

says:

My 13 yr old son was diagnosed with APD by a private therapist when he was 10. We removed him from pubic school (where he was classified as “gifted”) and homeschooled him for 3 years. We never solved the problem. I am a former middle grades teacher, with a masters in middle grades education, and I could not fix it. He returned to public school this week, and we are praying he does well. We wanted to try your program, but felt he was too old to use it. I would love to find something to help someone like him…an older student who is bright but struggles.

Cynthia Easterly

says:

I am really liking High Noon Intervention Reading for my older son who struggles.

Merry

says:

We’ve had teens and even adults use both our reading and spelling programs. Feel free to email me at support@allaboutlearningpress.com if you want info on how to use them with older students.

Kara

says:

Thank you for posting this blog entry, it helped shed some light on some of the issues I am struggling with. I’m anxious to read more and try some of the suggestions.

Emily Mast

says:

Love your words of wisdom on this subject!

Kathy Sweatt

says:

My daughter struggles with her reading, so I decided to purchase All About Reading. We have used All About Spelling for several years and it has been a blessing! So very excited to use All About Reading!!

Allison Myers

says:

It’s actually not my kids that struggle with ADP it’s me because I have over 55% hearing loss. I’ve been looking for something to help me teach and your program offers CD to help with sounds and such. I am very excited to be using this curriculum this year. It will be our first year to homeschool.

Penelope

says:

I’m not sure if my son has APD, but it sure sounds like he might! He can also only hear out of one ear, so I think this would be beneficial for him, either way! It’s a struggle to get him to listen to things, especially when trying to teach him to read.

Deborah Broadwell

says:

Many parents would benefit from having their child tested to help determine learning preferences that would help the parent develope teaching strategies.

We no longer homeschool, due to my own brain injury, but this program sounds like a wonderful supplement for two of my kids who find spelling to be a challenge. It was interesting reading through your tips and seeing how many of them (like being able to see what someone is saying) are now such a MUST for me, since my strokes!

Wendy Thelen

says:

One of our struggles in homeschool is keeping a schedule. With so many distractions it’s hard to keep both myself and my kids focused.

Dana

says:

So thankful to have this program. We have many learning issues including APD. I believe that because of AAR and AAS, these are two of our strongest subjects and my child is reading at the same level as her peers despite her learning difficulties.

Babs Harrell

says:

I am not sure if he has ADP but we think he could have a form of dyslexia. I am so glad we found AAS. It has really helped him to use multi-sensory approaches and memorizing rules. :) Thank you for your program!

alycia

says:

We deal more with dyslexia and are so very thankful for this program!!

Janis Bowles

says:

I have a child who has not been diagnosed but he seems to match with the description of the disorder above. He is 5 and I am concerned about what school will be like.

JoDee Wilch

says:

My son has APD as well as SI and Dysgraphia. I am really interested in this program as I am contemplating homeschooling him.

Amy

says:

I just learned about your program. I’m excited to learn more.

Annie

says:

We deal more with Dyslexia but know this program helps this as well

Karen Wallace

says:

My son shows every sign of APD and I’m sold on the AAL products! Can someone tell me, though, what qualities to look for in a math curriculum so that I can tailor the one I already have or look for another one if needs be. He’s really good at math and I don’t want to frustrate him with it.

Merry

says:

Hi Karen,

Look for some of the same qualities that are helpful in AAR and AAS:

Multi-sensory: something that allows him to take in information through visual and kinesthetic pathways as well as auditory, so that his weaker pathway can be strengthened while he continues to learn.

Manipulatives that allow you to show rather than tell.

Short explanations that aren’t too wordy.

Scripting that helps you know how to phrase something concisely (or if you are using a video/computer-based math, something that isn’t overly wordy). This way you can concentrate on helping him when he needs help.

Built-in review, or a way to easily add in review.

A logical and incremental presentation that doesn’t seem to “jump” in concepts.

I hope this helps!

Jaime Benoit

says:

You may want to take a look at Right Start Math to see what you think. As Merry mentioned, it has the same qualities that are helpful in AAL programs. My oldest has no problem with reading, but it has been helpful with her struggle in math.

Laura

says:

I’m not sure, but I think my son has an auditory processing problem. I haven’t done anything specifically for him.

Lisa Bellot

says:

I don’t believe my son has APD but he does have issues with sensory overload. This effects homeschooling when the lesson involves an extended amount of verbal explanation rather than a more step by step method. We started using All About Spelling and it has been a great program for him! I’d like to start using All About Reading as well, but finances are limited.

Hannah Jakelsky

says:

My son doesn’t have APD but we have been struggling with finding a program to teach him to read. We broke down and bought AAR even though it was a lot for us to spend but it has been worth every penny! We plan to continue using it and eventually AAS.

Kyra

says:

We are only in the beginning stages as my daughter is only four and a half but, for me, the biggest challenge is organization and consistency.

Melanie

says:

We used AAR with my son, sure wish it had been around at a younger age for my daughter.
She reads well now, but I am pretty sure she has an auditory processing disorder.

Love the AAR series!

kim

says:

My son is not officially diagnosed with APD, but over the years, I’ve long suspected he does have this. The strategies you mention are all ones I have instinctively learned to use, and while progress is slow, it’s progress!

Jessica S.

says:

My son that is currently using AAR and AAS does not suffer from this, but it is a possibility that my 3 YO may.

Beth

says:

I was not aware of APD because none of my children have had speech delays. I have had to deal with reading delays though. I think this article is good to read whether you have a child with APD or not. I like the ten tips.

Jessica

says:

My daughter doesn’t have APD but she does have SPD and high functioning autism. Wejusttke things at her pace and allow for lots of breaks to avoid frustration.

Jean

says:

Through many hours of internet research, trying to find a OG based (multi-sensory) reading program that was affordable, I stumbled upon All About Reading – – the answer to my prayers! My daughter is almost 6 and has been diagnosed with both expressive and receptive language processing issues. Language processing disorders are closely linked to APD. And though I have been told I “caught her condition early”, I am still, at times, overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of her situation and how much of an impact her disability will have on her learning. The Pre-Reading Level of AAR will help her learn how to begin reading at a comfortable pace and, for that, I am eternally grateful!

Michelle

says:

At this time, none of my children have APD, but thank you for sharing the article to raise awareness to it.

Attitude is our biggest struggle with my boys. Wiggles also interfere, but those are easier to work on.

Thank you,
Michelle

Deana

says:

My son does not have ADP but does struggle with being easily distracted. Thanks for the informative blog post.

Christine

says:

AAR has really helped us this schol year. Lots of fun for the kids and easy to use. Highly recommend it!

Christina Hall

says:

My kids don’t have APD, they do have dyslexia and AALP has been such a blessing to our family. My son was struggling with spelling, he was at @ a second grade level in 6th grade and after working through 5 and a half volumes of AAS he has the skills he needs to spell most words correctly most of the time. Spelling will always be something he needs to focus on but I’m thankful that he has the confidence he needs to communicate through written words.

Michelle

says:

I am so excited to start All About Spelling this year! I definitely have a child that is struggling with spelling and doesn’t seem to be retaining the lessons we’re doing. I am looking forward to this approach this year. September here we come!!

Jo

says:

My son has spd so some of his struggles are auditory. His proprioceptive needs are higher but we use a lot of similar methods to deal with both. Having this type of learner certainly builds my patience!!

Gennie Shelor

says:

My children don’t suffer with an APD, however my 3rd grader needs constant assistance and I’m trying to school my 4yr old as well. It can make for long days.

Morgan Lenker

says:

My son is 11 and is still struggling with reading, spelling, and writing. We have tried many different things. We also spent 3 1/2 months doing vision therapy with a therapist and while that did help the vision problems he was having, they told us that he had auditory processing issues as well. Like I said, we have tried a lot of different things and made little progress it seems. I do know that anything he can do with his hands and lots of movement helps him. We review sounds in the driveway with the basketball and keep short lessons. I think I would be willing to give All About Reading a try.

Shira

says:

My children currently learn another language before learning English reading and I’d like to be able to supplement their curriculum with a different way of teaching.

Katerina Stonehill

says:

My sons friend has an APD, I will share this with her parent.

Cherie

says:

Spelling is a struggle here!

Jessica

says:

I seem to have a hard time when I am preparing for a new school year.

Melissa

says:

My children do not have processing disorders.

Ana

says:

New to homeschooling, so I struggle with a starting off point and how to get organized with lesson plans.

Tanya Wellburn

says:

My oldest has APD. We have used most of your suggestions above as well as a specialized phoneme recognition computer program as he has the decoding type. It really helped his reading once he could hear the sounds that were once missing!
As well, we encourage him to slow down and ask questions if he doesn’t understand.

Merry

says:

Sounds like you’re doing a great job with your son, Tanya!

Karen

says:

Are there certain tests that can determine APD or CAPD?

Tanya Wellburn

says:

Yes, Karen, there are. We got our son tested through a specialized audiologist.

Jess

says:

My oldest son is ready to learn to read, but struggles with apraxia of speech as well as other articulation/ phonetic issues. We have been told that O-G based programs are going to be the way to go for him as he still struggles daily to remember phonetic sounds to letters.

Julie Knight

says:

My boys have difficulty sticking to a task. So I usually let them bounce on the trampoline before and in the middle of school

Sarah TerMaat

says:

While never diagnosed, I wonder if my oldest has APD. She has most of the symptoms listed above. We struggle with staying organized all year. We start out strong, but as the year goes on, it seems our organization goes with it.

Sarah M.

says:

I don’t have a child with APD, at least not that I’m aware of yet. My biggest struggle in our homeschool is juggling the time between all of my littles and working around nap schedules.

Deanna

says:

We just started homeschooling, but one thing I’ve noticed already that has been a struggle is keeping everything organized. I’m going to start using workboxes, so hopefully that will help.

Sarah

says:

My kids love the All About Reading program it is helping them to really succeed.

Corey

says:

I have been thinking about APD lately. This article is a great help to me.

toshia

says:

I suspect my son is dyslexic and i have heard great things about how this program helps kids with learning difficulties.

Mariana

says:

I think my son may have an APD. He is dyslexic and I really hope this program helps him to retain and remember what he learns,

Amy P

says:

My son is 11 and has struggled with reading and spelling all along. Last year he began vision therapy which helped some, but I have struggled with the right curriculum and how to teach him. He hates reading. I think I am going to order both AAR and AAS and hope the books aren’t too babyish for him. I’m desperate to help him.

Merry

says:

Hi Amy,

For reading, be sure to use the placement tests to decide which level he’s ready for: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-placement/

My friend took her 11 year-old through level 2 just for reinforcement and was surprised how many words he didn’t know. The challenge words help to show kids how to apply the concepts to harder words as well.

For spelling, he’d start with Level 1, but fast-track through. Here’s an example of how to do that:
http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/using-all-about-spelling-with-older-students/

The words are easy to start, so when you introduce AAS 1, tell him you know that he knows how to spell the easy words at the beginning, so that’s not going to be the focus. The focus is seeing if there are any concepts he doesn’t know, that will help make spelling of longer words easier. When you fill in those gaps, then you’ll be able to get to those harder words. You want the longer words to be as easy for him as the shorter ones, would he like that too?

It helps some kids understand if you compare to something like a video game or swimming lessons. Even though level 1 of a game or of lessons is easy to do, that doesn’t mean you should jump ahead to level 10. But it does mean that you can go quickly through the earlier levels, learning what you need to know so that when you DO get to the higher levels, you aren’t overwhelmed by having to learn too much at once.

Let us know if you hit any road blocks along the way; we’re always glad to help.

Darcy

says:

I don’t think I have a child with APD. My biggest struggle with homeschooling right now is keeping the toddlers busy while doing school with the older children.

margaret

says:

We do not struggle with issues, but the tips are good for any student. I am looking forward to using your programs with my 4th child.

Tanya

says:

I have a child who wants to read silently instead of Reading aloud to me. It has helped tremendously to bring Ziggy the zebra into the lesson. It seems to take the pressure off of him and makes the entire process much more enjoyable. Thanks for a great product!!

Jennifer H.

says:

I have two children with Autism. This was a really interesting article with some great ideas.

Renee S.

says:

My mom had me tested when I was 11 or12 and they told her I had an auditory processing problem, I guess disorder has been added in the last twenty years ;) I was deaf from 6 months old to 3 yrs and they figure that might have been what prompted the auditory processing problem. It has always been a struggle to get words down or even out of my mouth to express myself. My teachers through school thought I was slightly “slow,” I was even put in the dumbed down English class in high school, but the problem was never comprehension it was always reading speed and quickly expressing myself. To everyone’s surprise I got an A in the class. Even though I received auditory processing therapy, basically tips and ways to help myself with the issue without depending on others to even know I had an issue, it has still been a struggle. I find it becoming apparent again while trying to get going in homeschooling. Thank you for the post and the reminder of ways to help with auditory processing issues through life :)

Kelly

says:

I had never heard of APD before this post. Thanks for sharing.

courtnee held

says:

AAS and AAR have been a blessing to my son who has several learning challenges.

haley ward

says:

My son struggles with minor dislexia he gets so fristrated but so far this program has been successful!

Joni

says:

My biggest struggle has been with attention and teaching my son reading. We are going to use AAR this year and are super excited. He is a hands on learner so I am excited to see if the program will draw him in.

Jaclyn Reynolds

says:

One of our biggest homeschooling struggles is sensory issues with my sons.

Lenora D

says:

My main struggle is attention span.

Maryna

says:

I never really knew much about APD, but reading the blog post really rang a bell with me. The symptoms really sounds like my son. I have to explain every task that my son needs to complete in clear very detailed steps or he never remembers. I repeat everything over and over. I was always under the impression that is just the way he is and accepted him that way. Many other people get frustrated as my son might not ‘catch on’ as quick with certain instructions. When he was younger he had a major speech delay. It was heart breaking as kids never wanted to play with him as he could not speak. I eventually took him to a speech therapist and that helped so much. Today several years later and homeschooling for many years he is still unable to work in a noisy room.
My son has had several melt downs due to him being severely frustrated. I just hold him for several minutes until he calms down and then we try again. The tips above really do work as we have been doing it for a long time.

mallie shirk

says:

Thank you for such an informative article!

Judith Martinez

says:

I think I have an auditory processing issue and these tips seem like things that would help me.

DailyWoman (Lacey)

says:

I always try to use lots of visual lessons. That seems to work well for my son.

Stacy Wiley

says:

One of our greatest struggles is concentrating over younger siblings ages 4 and 19 months!

Anna

says:

Making consistent time is our biggest homeschool challenge.

Amber Smyder

says:

We absolutely love AAS & AAR. We have noticed, from early on, that my 7yo seems to have a hard time following even simple directions, is extremely distracted in a loud or busy settings, and responds best to learning one on one. He struggled a great deal to begin phonics and reading…he absolutely dreaded it! I think the biggest challenge for him is that he hears things differently than they’re actually spoken. One thing that works effectively for him in learning, following directions, etc., is to keep things as short and simple as possible and to then have him repeat back to me what it is we’re trying to teach or instruct at the moment. It’s also so important not to make him or allow him to feel poorly for not being able to repeat things back some times, but to simply tell him he’s doing great and to repeat the phrase/sentence again.

Tiffany

says:

My son struggles with school because he struggles with reading. He has displayed some dyslexic tendencies but his doctor said they are normal and he should out grow them. I have tried other things to help him with his reading and this year I am turning to all about reading. I really hope this helps so that he doesn’t dread school like he does now.

Merry

says:

I hope you get the help you need! Do know that we provide support for all of our programs–you can email us with questions any time. It’s hard to see one of our kids struggle, and it’s good that you are looking for help now.

Nathania

says:

I love the implementation of visual and touch together! Though my child does not struggle with apd we do struggle with finding ways to learn how to read that keep her attention and keep her motivated to learn.

jacqueline

says:

My oldest has expressive speech delays and that has effected her spelling abilities. She also has a harder time learning new things. Multi sensory learning helps her a LOT which is why we have gone back to AAS. Regular spelling programs jsut don’t wought her how to rk well for her. AAS gave her confidence and taught her how to segment the words to figure out how to spell them.

Merry

says:

Hi Jacqueline,

That’s great to hear, I’m so glad AAS has helped your daughter!

Beth

says:

I think my son may have APD, it would make sense given the symptoms he has. I try to give him simple instructions, and I have him repeat them but then he still doesnt always follow through without having to be told many times again. He seems to forget very quickly. I will be researching this more for him, thanks!

alicia fortney

says:

Our biggest struggle with homeschooling is keeping up a regular routine. My son also is a grade behind in reading bc he likes hard/fast rules and struggles to grasp all the “rule-breakers” of the English language!

E H.

says:

Thank you for sharing these ideas. I have two with APD! We love AAS and find it a good fit for these children. Thank you for all you do!

Diana G.

says:

My son doesn’t have APD, but has strong indicators for both dyslexia and dysgraphia. I can’t wait to start the all about reading program with him because I have a feeling he will strongly benefit from it.

My children don’t have APD, but my youngest son has various special needs, including mild CP, sensory issues, and possibly ASD.

Jennifer G.

says:

My son isn’t officially diagnosed with APD but he is high functioning ASD and has many of the same issues. I think AAR and AAS will help him a lot.

Stephanie Boyd

says:

Good attitudes are our struggle!

CJ

says:

we do afterschooling method. Hardest part is setting a schedule that works with school and sports.

Asomba

says:

I have a 5 year old son. The hardest part is keeping him to sit still. He requires a lot of large movement activities!

Christine

says:

Just keeping things fresh and fun is our challenge

Gina

says:

Both of my kiddos have APDs. The only way to know for sure is to have your child tested by an audiologist. APD can look and feel like ADD / ADHD. The child has to be a little bit older (age 8, may be?) to have official testing. The auditory channel isn’t even done maturing until age 13. In our state, the state School for the Deaf offers the testing complimentary (yes, free!)

Loreen G

says:

AAS has worked so well for my struggling speller. I wish we’d known about AAS when he was in Kindergarten struggling with phonics. He had difficulty (& still does) hearing the difference between some sounds, esp short i & e. AAS has really helped him make great strides in reading & spelling & we are so happy to have it as part of our home school curriculum.

Julie Smith

says:

My daughter struggled for several years to learn to read using other reading programs. AAR was what opened her mind to the joys of reading through the many wonderful ways she could “touch” the written word. Thank you for this amazing curriculum that has removed the tears and added smiles to our reading lessons!

Sherri B.

says:

My child tends to struggle with sitting down and reading. We have tried all sorts of things from reading on the porch or me reading to her. I am hoping if I don’t push to hard but gently keep a love for books before her, the love for reading will come.

Brandy A.

says:

We have a child that can not handle failure. This can be difficult at times because he gets very upset when he makes a mistake. I am always assuring him that we are not born knowing and understanding everything in life and that’s why it’s called learning and not knowing. This sounds great to me and others but to him he still looks at it as failure. I can only hope one day this will click with him and he will relax a bit.
He does come by this honest because his father is the same way. His father is an excellent test taker (unlike me, I’m thrilled to have ever had a passing grade of C or above) but if he does happen to get below 100% it ruins his whole day.
This may seem like a small thing compared to other’s disabilities but it really can ruin the experience of a cheerful home school day.

Karen Wallace

says:

Brandy,
You are not alone. THat sounds just like my son. And you are right about the way it affects the day. He also is hard to get motivated to do the schoolwork.

Amy

says:

I have a child with dyslexia and have been using All About Spelling. It incorporates many of the techniques that private tutors who work with dyslexic children use. Highly recommend it!

Beth Spear

says:

I would love to know if this works for dyslexia? I have two kids that are really struggling with reading.

Amy

says:

Beth – see my post above.

Merry

says:

Hi Beth,

Yes it does! Both All About Reading and All About Spelling are Orton-Gillingham based. Marie is a member of the International Dyslexia Association, and is an instructor for the graduate level courses in Orton-Gillingham Literacy Training offered through Nicolet College in Rhinelander, Wisconsin. If you haven’t had a chance to watch their story about her son’s struggles, you may want to check that out. Quite amazing!

http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/about

Both our reading and spelling programs are explicit and tell students exactly what they need to know in order to spell or read. We don’t make them guess. The lessons are laid out in an orderly form for the teacher too, so that each day you can simply open and go. The programs are easy to do at home without prior training.

Here are some ways that AAR and AAS can help kids with dyslexia and other learning disabilities:

-The programs are incremental and mastery based. Our sequence was very carefully tested to reduce confusion for the child. A student will master one concept at a time before adding in others.

– AAR and AAS are multisensory. They approach learning through sight, sound, and touch. This helps kids who struggle with memory issues, because they take in information in various ways and also interact with it in various ways. The kinesthetic approach can be very helpful to a child who has expressive language struggles

– They use specially color-coded letter tiles. Working with the letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept.

– AAS and AAR are scripted, so you can concentrate on your child. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage. Marie also spent a lot of time researching how to word the rules. Our rules are worded so they are as easy for children to remember as possible.

– Both have built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning disabilities generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. After a concept has been taught, don’t assume that the child knows it. Quickly revisit that concept again in the next lesson. With AAR and AAS, your child will have a Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows. Customized review is important for kids with short attention spans because you want every minute of your lesson to count.

Another benefit of the review is that you can practice with your child what to say–you can rehearse as many or as few times as your child needs to help him remember the concepts. One of the things that Marie noticed when she was researching reading programs is that few programs have enough review built in for kids who struggle to gain fluency, which is why AAR includes lots of reading practice.

– AAR and AAS are logical and incremental. They provide the structure, organization and clear guidance that kids who struggle need in order to learn.

-AAS includes dictation that starts out very short–Level 1 starts out with just words and then progresses to 2-word phrases. Level 2 includes phrases and shorter sentences, while Level 3 moves up to slightly longer sentences. With dictation you will say the phrase or sentence and have your child repeat it. If possible, you want to encourage your child to really focus so that you only say the phrase or sentence once, and they can repeat it and then write it. You are training them to expand their working memory a little at a time. You can always break things down more to meet your student’s needs, too. The dictation is meant to be spread over several days, so you can take as much or as little time on that part as your child needs.

Allison

says:

Great tips! Thanks!

Maureen Ruble

says:

Interesting article….my three children do not appear to have APD but my eldest does have difficulty adapting to noisy or loud situations as he becomes overwhelmed. The biggest challenge in our homeschool is having everyone focus without becoming distracted by their siblings.

Kristin

says:

I feel blessed that my children do not have APD. One struggle in our HS is what to do with the littles.

Shannon Leon

says:

One thing that I try to do is place my hand on my son’s shoulder when I’m speaking to him. When I’m telling something important or asking for his help, I find that connecting it with touch gets his attention and helps him maintain focus. It’s much more effective than screaming across the room.

SaraElizabeth

says:

My son doesn’t have ADP, but often struggles with staying focused and following directions. I think some of these tips will help. Thanks

Madonna

says:

I don’t actually have a kiddo that struggles with APD. Our biggest struggle is working around a toddler.

Myra

says:

My son does not have APD, and he is just going into the first grade. Sometimes he struggles with staying on task, but I think it’s just the active boy in him! :-)

Charis

says:

I have more than one easily distracted child and appreciate the reminders to slow down and help them to focus (speaking slowly, helping them process). I know I rush around too much!

Kelly P.

says:

My children do not have APD but I have one child with vision issues that making paying attention & focusing very difficult. He has been thriving with AAR & AAS thus far & we are so thankful for this program. It is set up in such a way that really allows him to feel confident in his abilities!!!

Emily S.

says:

My daughter doesn’t have APD, but I think my nephew may. It seems like he never hears anything, we often repeat instructions to him several times. Often someone will be talking to him and then they will ask him a question and he will ask what the question was and often he will be clueless. It’s almost as if he is in another world altogether and he has to make an effort to be present in the now.

Amy

says:

My daughter (who is my middle kiddo) struggles with reading (possibly dyslexia) and we are so thankful to have found AAR. She is thriving with this program!

Sarah

says:

We have struggled with learning to read with 1 of our children and would like to try the AAR level 2 with him. We also had trouble with spelling with another child and AAS really helped!

Sarah

says:

My daughter struggles and I can’t wait to see how this may help her

Danielle Rosenberg

says:

My son has every sign of APD so it would make sense that he might have it.

Brandi

says:

We don’t struggle with APD. We struggle with trying to get done too fast and making mistakes!

Alison

says:

We don’t struggle with APD but we have struggled immensely with spelling. So much in fact, that we have taken a hiatus from it. I keep saying that we are going to start AAS, but haven’t ordered yet!

Alice Ross

says:

None of my kids has APD. My oldest, a gifted reader, practically taught himself to read at 4. My next has reading difficulties, possibly dyslexia along with being diagnosed with eye alignment and focusing issues. She is finding AAR and AAS so useful. I wish I had found it sooner. My youngest is neither gifted or challenged at reading, but she enjoys your programs too. I’m glad I found AAR.

Adrien

says:

My child is struggling with punctuation. He forgets to pay close attention to where one sentence starts and another begins as he reads.

Missy Porter

says:

We do not have to struggle with APD. We, thankfully, haven’t really had many struggles with our homeschooling journey and I just feel extremely blessed to be able to keep my children at home.

Amy

says:

We do not deal with APD, but one of my children has an eye tracking issue. Reading became much easier when we discovered AAR.

Kimberly

says:

We have not figured out a specific diagnosis, but my child has some type of learning disability…dyslexia is a strong contender, but she also shows signs of other issues, including some symptoms of APD. The great thing about AAR is that we have been able to help her make progress and feel more confident without waiting for a specific diagnosis. The techniques have been wonderful.

Julie Bryce

says:

I am thrilled to consider this guide to teaching my Do who needs the exact words and guidance! THANKS for introducing the multi sensory program for auditory learning and possibly hindered students!

Emily Wolfenbarger

says:

My 6 year old son has not been diagnosed with any disorders but he struggled with his Kindergarten year and is still not reading. I think that he probably was just not quite mature enough to handle a full curriculum yet and had a very short attention span.

Lisa Penner

says:

I’m only beginning so I’m not sure what obstacles we’ll run into

Danielle Hull

says:

No, I don’t have a child with APD. I have had a couple of issues where we had to change what we were doing. My son, now 14, didn’t enjoy cutting or even writing, so we let his sisters cut out lapbooks for him, and he now gets to type more than write. Another child was struggling with what we used to teach reading, and I was tired of it, too, so we changed and are both happier!

Kristie

says:

My 10yo daughter is struggling with spelling and reading. We have ordered both programs and we can’t wait for them to get here so we can start.

Mary

says:

My child does not have APD. He is MR with anxiety disorder and struggles with learning. He has a hard time remembering from one day to the next what he has learned. So there is a lot of repetition. I am excited to try All About Reading and see if we can make some headway.

B. J. Lund

says:

modify subscription

Michele

says:

My six-year-old son had seizures before he turned one and now struggles with APD. His speech was delayed and he would not even respond to his name. We have seen a speech therapist for the past year and I have learnt so much. When I give him instructions, I make sure he is looking at me and then he repeats the instruction before going to do them. This way he is more likely to succeed. He has started phonics and we are taking it slowly, with lots of review. It is really great to see him making progress!

Leslie Oakley

says:

My six year old is soo anxious to learn how to read. She is looking forward to reading her lessons as well as her two older sisters who are eight and ten. As for spelling, they could all use a little help.

Nancy S.

says:

One son (11 yo) has dyslexia, and another son (5 yo) has several symptoms of APD and possible dyslexia. It is a challenge teaching both of them, but we are making progress. I also struggle with keeping our house organized enough with all the school materials! I’m trying to decide if formal testing is important enough to justify the cost.

Katherine

says:

We don’t struggle with APD, and we are just starting our first year of homeschooling, so I don’t know for sure yet, but for my Type A personality, I anticipate that my biggest struggle will be going with the flow and not sticking to the plan all the time.

Jennifer Yeary

says:

I am not sure if my adopted son has APD or not. He did get tested for dyslexia last year when he was in public school but as soon as the adoption became final in November, we pulled him out. The noisy classrooms, constant interuptions and distractions, etc… was a recipe for disaster. We eased up on the learning, tried to focus more on phonics, and just read a lot of him. Doing reserach this summer I kep hearning recommendations for your 2 programs. We can’t wait to see how far he will come.

As far as getting his attention to listen to directions, I try not to “lob” directions at him from across the room or even in another room. It is better if I get him to look me in the eye or lightly touch his arm to make sure he is engaged.

I guess I will need to do more research on the APD aspect of things.

Julie Frederick

says:

Thank you for presenting tools for me to work with to help my struggling learner.

Krista

says:

I do not have a child with APD. I struggle with figuring out the best program for my child – just starting out so it is all a little overwhelming!

Caroline Frahm

says:

I do not have a child with APD. Struggles in our homeschool include staying organized and getting along with each other.

Stacy

says:

Wow! My 10 year old struggles with every one of these. He wears hearing aids and has speech delays. I just ordered AAR and AAS. My husband struggles with dyslexia and I believe this is another issue for my son. After reading this article I feel even more determined to have the testing done for APD. Thank you for all your insight and encouragement. Even though I have known that many others out there are in the same situation, it is nice to read these posts and this article and really feel that I am not alone. Thank you!

Brandy L.

says:

We do not deal with APD in our home, but we have our own struggles. All three of my children are gifted and very strong emotions and perfectionism come with that. The smallest mistake (wrote a seven backwards) can send them into crying fits. I have been trying to give them the tools to handle making mistakes and giving themselves grace.

Jennifer Bruce

says:

I just began the homeschooling journey with my youngest child and would love to win the products!
As a past educator I am so happy with the approach these programs take.

Andrea

says:

This is the first time I’ve seen this program, but it sounds great! We’re just starting 1st grade with one of our sons, and we’re a little “behind” schedule for reading. I want learning to be fun for him…not a dreaded chore. This program sounds like just what we’re looking for.

Michelle

says:

We are using both AAR and AAS with our kids. We have tried quite a few programs without success before finding AAR. While it isn’t a magic cure, we have seen more consistent progress with these programs then with any of the others we have tried.

We don’t struggle with APD, but I often second-guess myself as a mom and teacher. We all struggle with being less-than sometimes. I pray for God’s guidance in teaching my kids how they best learn.

Danielle

says:

We do not struggle with ADP, but I would like to improve my organization and some better routines. I would like to spend more time prepping and setting up for the week ahead so that I make sure we cover everything that I want to. Also, we don’t have any routine whatsoever. It would be nice now that there are three school age kids, including a preschooler, to have some sort of routine established.

Sarah

says:

I am having more challenges than I remember having with my older 2 sons in teaching reading to my 3rd son. He has several characteristics mentioned in the article, so I will be looking into Auditory Processing Deficit. Thank you for all the good ideas to help him!

Erica

says:

This will be our first year homeschooling! Hopefully there are no problems.

Donna

says:

At our daughters 3 month parent teacher conference her 1st grade teacher suspected it. We had never heard of it before. two weeks ago we had her tested at Crozier-Chester Medical Center in Philadelphia by an Audiologist. She went through several hours of testing. She was Diagnosed with a type of Auditory Processing called Decoding Deficit which affects her auditory closure, temporal processing, auditory discrimination and binaural separation and or integration. What was also interesting to them is that her Math tested at a 4yr 4month of age but her reading level and vocabulary tested at 11 years of age. She just turned 7. They feel because Math instruction is mainly verbal that is where she struggles. They feel she may have a relatively high IQ and she relies on that for her reading because there is not much instruction for that. She compensates with her reading. However because she is reading higher then at meeting standards it is assumed she is fine when she is not and for that reason she would have possibly “slip through the cracks” of receiving help. We were very blessed to have a teacher recognize it so that we could get the ball rolling in getting her help. Thank you for this article it was very informative.

Jackie

says:

We do not have a struggle with APD. We are just getting our feet wet with homeschooling, since my oldest son is only 3. He is gifted, so my biggest struggle so far is that his brain and his maturity don’t match up. He wants to learn and he’s able to retain ridiculous amounts of knowledge, but I struggle to find a balance of age appropriate fun while satisfying his craving to learn.

Michelle Drake

says:

We do not struggle with ADP in our home, although our daughter does have separation anxiety in new situations and we are constantly trying to encourage her to spread her wings a little and try new things without us “right there.” It is a slow process but she is getting there. I think it is helping that her younger brother is a social butterfly, he does a lot of the ice breaking and then she can happily tag along and fall into place!

Nicolle Gauthier

says:

I suspected that my middle child had ADP and after reading the article I am now convinced. While reading I recgonized that I had it as well. I have always had truoble with comprehension and memorization, having to be shown how to do something rather than told, and I heavily relied on reading lips; which my child struggles with these too. We began using AAR at the beginning of the last spring semester and I have seen improvement in his reading and spelling. We have not used it all summer but I am looking forward to picking it up again in the fall.

Heather S

says:

I don’t think I have a child struggling with this, but I appreciate the information that will help me be more aware if some of these things come up as we begin our homeschool journey.

tashatrp

says:

I am not sure if my son has a processing disorder or not, he exhibits some of the symptoms but not a lot. We are thinking of getting him tested but just haven’t yet.

Sarah

says:

Marie, thank you for the info on your website! Our oldest son was diagnosed with dyslexia and dysgraphia about a year ago. An amazing lady helped us begin the Barton Method. Within the past year our son has grown by leaps and bounds in his reading skills. I know that we still have a long road ahead of us as he is easily distracted in his daily school work.

Even though our middle son has not been diagnosed with APD, we see a lot of similarities as in our oldest. He too struggles with word recognition and spelling, so we began Barton with him as well. Our youngest son who just turned 5 in May shows even more signs of ADP than the older two. A friend let me borrow “The Green Readiness Book”, and I also began “How to Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons” with him. So far, he is responding well to both of those books; however, I have been eyeing your pre-reading program.

lauren

says:

We do not struggle with this, but our main struggle is scheduling and working independently.

Shawna Fay

says:

So glad your program can help kids with APD. God Bless

Catherine

says:

Our family does not struggle with APD, but any child can benefit from the multisensory approach used in AAS. We use it for all age ranges, from our younger children who are just learning to spell, to our “pre-teen” who has always found spelling to be a challenge.

The biggest challenge in homeschooling is time management. AAS helps us use time more efficiently, by learning skills to encode words, rather than memorizing a limited set of words.

Ilenia

says:

My children do not have this condition. But it is good to know…..I do suspect my oldest child has dysgraphia and I’ve had to adapt our homeschool teaching methods to accommodate this and make it easier for her to communicate her ideas. Writing, used to be like torture for her. She still has some issues when she writes but we have worked with different methods that have helped her a lot. This is why this curriculum would help so much!!

Andrea Gardner

says:

My son has APD. He also has SPD (sensory processing disorder) and he has dyslexia and has trouble tracking (although that is getting better). He has been in so many therapies and using iLs (Integrated Listening System). Homeschooling is a struggle and we have good days and bad days. Reading to him helps a ton so long as he can color and/or doodle while I am reading out loud. It helps his retention.
i have been wanting to try the All About programs I just can’t afford it after the therapy bills.

Christina

says:

Our son is 14yrs old an in the 9th grade was Dx with APD and speech delay at a early age. He does get frustrated at time but I tell him to step back breath and start all over. When he gets all excited his words are everywhere I have to remind him to speak slower. He is in regular class room and has study hall for extra help, his grades are outstanding A’s, B’s and some C’s. He is aware of his disability and but that doesn’t stop him from achieving his goals. He is currently playing football at his high school. He does have an IEP through school. I do push him, I don’t let his disability slow him down or give him a reason not to do his best in school and he refuses to let it get in his way. He’s awesome.

sarah grignon

says:

I have never heard of this but I think this is what my son has, we have been struggling for awhile. I can not wait to get the spelling and reading programs for this homeschool year, I know it will do us good.

Maya

says:

I’ve never heard of this condition. It is good to be informed about it.

samW

says:

i wonder if my daughter does, i need to look into this a bit more…sometimes i say something to her & she just stands there & looks at me like “hu?” very interesting…thank you!!!

Carolyn

says:

Our middle son struggles at times with APD. He hears at normal ranges but differently in both ears–one high tones, one lower tones. We have had to make sure he is looking at us; speak slowly, clearly, and louder; make sure there is no interfering noises. He reads well but doesn’t like spelling. Since he learns better by seeing than hearing, we have used spelling sites online to support his written work.

Merry

says:

Very interesting! My son has a “preferred” ear. He hears the same in both but prefers to take in information through his right ear when we are going over school work.

cristy

says:

These are good tips for children with or without APD. We don’t have this, as far as I know, but I appreciate the helpful tips!

Paige Holland

says:

I am looking for something to help my struggling reader who has not been diagnosed with any disorder as of yet. I keep coming back to All About Learning. Thank you for the information!

Laura

says:

I beginning to seriously wonder about APD for my 13 year old daughter. In her words, something “switched off” around the time she turned eleven, and we’ve had issues with comprehension and retention – especially oral – since around that time. If this is a cause, it will be wonderful to have the additional help. We’ve used AAS for a number of years now, and when it sticks, it works. Sometimes it doesn’t appear to stick (APD?) but once it is really in her head, it stays.
Thanks!!

Tara S.

says:

My girls have not shown signs of APD but I appreciate the information in the event that a future child may have APD. Homeschooling has its ups and downs and struggles and victories in all areas and we appreciate all the helpful resources available!

Libby Pierce

says:

My 11 yo son is dyslexic, he struggles with reading and spelling. My 14 yo is a terrible speller, but a great reader. We just started homeschooling in January. I recently bought both of them level 1 in AAS and hope to start it in the morning.

Ralene

says:

I’ve actually never heard of APD, but I think that may be something I’ll have to look into. My 8yo DD has struggled with reading/spelling from the beginning. Her reading comprehension and recollection is very short. All the symptoms you listed but one, I’ve seen in her. Thank you!

Amberleigh

says:

While my kids don’t have APD, but we do struggle with ADHD and this program looks fantastic for that.

Lynn

says:

I don’t think my kids fit in this category. They show some of the signs but not enough to be classified as such. I feel this would be a good program for that reason.

Chere

says:

All of my kids have had different learning challenges. Wish AAR and AAS were around for my oldest. I love AAS and plan to use AAR with my youngest this year.

Lisa

says:

Well my children do not show any signs of APD but they are still very young and we are just starting out on this journey called homeschooling. It does give me information on things to look out for though.

Bethany Wright

says:

Our biggest struggle is trying to read to fast. I have to tell my daughter to slow down and reread the sentence so it makes sense because she leaves words out trying to read so fast! She is getting better though and learning to correct herself if she mispronounces a word or misses a word.

Julie Roy

says:

Great article…so helpful. Thank you!

Christine Nadolny

says:

My boys don’t have APD, but my oldest is ASD. So with the multisensory activities this program can help all the basis of which he functions. I am excited to start Pre AAR & AAR & AAS level 1 with them this year. Thank you for opportunity to win to go towards Level 2!

Gail Speis

says:

This reminds me of my 7 year old who is really struggling with reading. Thank you for the ideas!- Gail

Joey

says:

Our 3-year-old has multiple developmental issues (speech delay, sensory, focusing, gross motor), including all of the signs above. This is something we should look into. Thank you for the informative article and giving us more insight into helping our daughter’s learning!

Sandra

says:

So glad to be given an overview like this. My son had hyperacusis so his hearing is impeccable but still he had problems following directions. I’ll definitely share this resource with friends of children that have these issues. In my son’s case removing heavy metals via low dose frequent chelation has helped him recover a lot. He used to not be able to stand the noise of busy public places. Movie theaters were something we avoided because it was sensory overload for him. I’m still learning but he is getting better. And we love All about Spelling! :)

Diana

says:

We have struggled with dysgraphia and inability to focus. Very curious about the auditory topic!

Sheryl

says:

We don’t struggle with APD, but my son does struggle with disgraphia. We’ve had to make some changes in how much he has to write with pencil on paper.

Stacy

says:

We struggle we staying focused. I hope this curriculum will help.

Our biggest struggle in our homeschool? Before we bought AAS, it was spelling! We were using the traditional “Get a list on Monday, have a test on Friday” method. This resulted in major frustration and even tears on most days for my son. Now, spelling is a breeze! SO glad I found your program. :)

Alexis

says:

This is a good list of tips for working with children with all kinds of struggles. I use many of them with my highly distractable daughter and with my behavioral therapy clients with Autism.

Sarah

says:

Thanks for the info. I know my girls struggle with this. I already use your spelling and reading. It was helpful for me to remember to slow down and speak.

Stacie

says:

My son struggles with some of these. We have been using AAR and AAS for 3 years and he has learned so much! We love both programs. I am now using AAR with my middle son.

Christie

says:

I am so excited to use the all about reading and all about spelling! We are just beginning our homeschool adventure and from all I have read and heard about these programs, I’m sure we will be pleased!!

Sarah Perry

says:

My child has APD and these products are very good and so easy to use!

Christina Baker

says:

My child does not struggle with APD, however, she does struggle with some APD difficulties listed here. I have recently purchased all about reading to use with her and look forward to see how far it takes her in reading.

Keira

says:

My son has both APD and is dyslexic. It has been a struggle, especially when his little sister started passing him up with reading. We are still trying to figure it all out, though we have tried specialists and many different curriculums.

Janna Birn

says:

My son has not been diagnosed with APD, but definitely has processing issues. He was speech delayed and has struggled with reading and writing. We have tried a bunch of programs to no avail. We just got AAR and he loves it!

Sara Ruiz

says:

I have been truly blessed by the all about reading program. My son is truly attaining the skills that public school just couldn’t offer! This system allows the average parent the ability to make learning enjoyable and attainable!

Krystal

says:

My daughter has APD and she struggled with reading, spelling and writing until I found AAS and AAR. I started her on the program in March, 2014 and by April she had completed level 1 and was half way through level 2 of AAS and was almost done with level 1 of AAR. I was impressed because she begged to do it and just soaked it all up. She is six years old and reading and spelling at a third grade level. Thank you so much for these programs. My daughter and I are both extremely grateful for a program that makes learning easier for children that have some struggles.

Merry

says:

Wow, congratulations to you and your daughter!

Kate Dickey

says:

Once again, I’m so glad we’ve made the choice to use AAR and AAS. My son has some of these struggles which, I’m convinced, is why 2 other programs we used just didn’t work so well for him. This is a choice that we both (and now the younger sisters) enjoy!

Mrs. B

says:

My daughter has not been diagnosed with APD but she was tested and has a disconnect like you mentioned. Also the long term memory problems. I have struggled many years on my own and am hoping this program will finally help us.

Alana Shaw

says:

My son does not have APD but one of my struggles in homeschooling is learning to teach things in ways that I never learned them. We have purchased AAS for this year and I am amazed at the difference in teaching my youngest compared to the way that my older two learned in public school and how I learned.

Desire

says:

I don’t think my daughter has APD, but I hope AAS helps her. Her spelling is horrible and we hope to spend the next year improving.

Esther

says:

I don’t think my daughter has APD, but we LOVE AAS!

Brook Vernon

says:

My middle child has not been diagnosed with APD, however I suspect that something is a miss. He is three, had delayed speech and he struggles sometimes getting out his words- although he has an extensive vocabulary. He is constantly on the go, easily distracted and seems to not always hear what is being said to him. I hope as he gets older that I can figure out what is going on because I feel as if he is in the dark sometimes and cannot explain or tell me his frustrations.

April Croissant

says:

Neither of my boys have APD, but one of my boys does have other difficulties. He has SPD, 2 genetic disorders, severe anxiety, and a primary immunodeficiency disorder. All of those cause various difficulties for learning which is a main reason I pulled him from public school in May.

Andy

says:

My son and daughter both have APD. We are trying AAS this year and I can’t wait to get started!

Melody

says:

My son, who definitely has a struggle remembering things does well with AAS. The hands on component works great for him!

Kim

says:

I wouldn’t say my child has a disorder, but some of the tips would definitely help us

Angie Lovero

says:

My daughter has a mild APD, as well as possible dyslexia. I repeat things a lot for her & ask her to repeat back what I have told her. She will often repeat herself in an “under her breath” type of whisper. Had anyone else seen this with their child? And what is the significance of this behavior? Thanks.

Merry

says:

Often it can be a child’s way of focusing themselves and remembering what was said. Some will vocalize in their heads instead of repeating out loud or in a whisper.

Karen Wallace

says:

To Angie,

I have a 7-y-o son who, in a whisper, sometimes repeats back his own words or phrases or a word or phrase of someone talking to him. It’s almost as if he is vocalizing out loud what is in his head, like Merry was describing. Other than one other sign of APD, I don’t notice any other issues.

Amber

says:

Thanks for the information.

Lia

says:

I have a son with APD. To say we’re flexible with his schooling is an understatement. He reads well above his grade level, but his method is very chaotic. I’d like to be able to teach him a more ordered, consistent, way to organize information. I’ve looked at this program for years and would love to be able to give it a try.

Millicent

says:

My daughter was unofficially diagnosed with APD as well as Dyslexia. A friend recommended AAR and it helped so much! Now my 5 year-old is showing the same signs, so we ordered pre-reading for him!

Dana

says:

Thanks so much for this article. It is always helpful to read how kids learn.

Jennifer

says:

I started suspecting dyslexia in my right brained learner several years ago, but he has all the symptoms for APD. I have been using All About Spelling for three years with him and my two other boys. AAS has saved our homeschool, and I use it’s approach in other subjects too! I would like to win this so I can buy AAR! Whoever wins this is getting a huge blessing. Thanks for the generous giveaway:)

Jennifer

says:

Our son was diagnosed with APD at a very early age and also struggles with profound Dyslexia. I greatly appreciate your article on APD, especially the section on How I can Help my Child In Spite of APD. Recently his APD has really begun to effect his speech and it has become increasingly more difficult to understand him. I realized after reading your blog, it is because I am speaking far too quickly and forgetting to enunciate clearly. Thank you for the reminder! Last year, we decided to homeschool in order to specifically meet his learning needs. We began AAS in January. The Orton-Gillingham approach definitely clicks with his learning style. We are excited to see how the AAS curriculum will positively impact his learning experience as we continue with Level 1 this year.

Julie Heckert

says:

I have several children that struggle with auditory processing issues. They process information very slowly which makes learning a challenge. They have not been diagnosed with APD but I can identify with many of the signs of it that were listed. I have found that using an Orton-Gillingham approach to reading and spelling has helped these students tremendously. We have had to use an Orton-Gillingham approach that is grouped into topical focuses (ex. all the silent e rules together or all suffix and prefix rules taught at once) more so than AAS or AAR but these products have helped my other children who have a desire to learn the same rules but aren’t bothered when a program skips around a bit more. AAS has offered a gentle bridge for my young ones to see where their strengths and weaknesses lie so that we can address each in turn. This is our first year to try All about reading. Ziggy is a hit!

Edith Sanchez

says:

This sounds like a kid I teach in my preschool Sunday school at church. It would answer lots of questions! Thanks for the knowledge to understand and pass along.

Cherie

says:

My grandson probably has APD, as well as mild autism, mild cerebral palsy, sensory disorder, ADHD, and dyslexia. He has had and has many therapies. It is helping him. He has all of the symptoms for APD.

Kimberly

says:

Kimberly
AUGUST 13, 2014 AT 1:54 AM
We began using AAR after having our youngest struggle with reading despite being very bright in other subject areas. We now suspect at least one of our kiddos may have dyslexia. Another may have an auditory processing issue (he had many ear infections as a baby and toddler).

I’ve been intrigued with the Orton-Gillingham method, and I am eager to see the outcome of its use now that we are using AAS and AAR. Our youngest is finally getting her confidence after using AAR for half a year.

Anneri Chudleigh

says:

My daughter has APD, we have just started with Level 1 AAR and AAS, and it is such a relief and blessing after going the normal school route of 20 spelling words on Monday and test of Friday. That did not help her, only frustrated us both. Thank you for all the information.
Anneri

cheryl smith

says:

Thank you so much , Marie, for taking the time to respond to my comment. This article was so helpful and informative. Your program is an answer to many prayers and tears over the years. God Bless! Cheryl Smith

Cammy

says:

Since the auditory and visual system are very much connected it is also important to make sure your child does not have issues with their visual system such as saccades, tracking, accommodation, and the many other issues that are not related to visual acuity. My son had some of the above symtoms but they were related to his visual issues that were corrected with 6 months of vision therapy. See http://www.covd.org for more information. And the issues that he still have I think are related to his retain spinal galant reflex. For more information on retained reflexes see: http://www.retainedneonatalreflexes.com.au

Bailey Shaw

says:

Keeping my little on track is the biggest hurdle for us.

Jessica

says:

My son was not diagnosed with auditory processing disorder, and doesn’t struggle at all with reading or spelling, but he use to show a lot of the signs for APD. We pulled him out of public school after he finished 1st grade because the noise in the classroom was too distracting (amongst other reasons). He would tell me that the sound of the the other kids pencils made it hard for him to concentrate. He doesn’t seem to have as much problem with this now though.
My daughter struggles with math and spelling. She use to have a lot of problems with letter and number reversals. She actually use to write in mirror image. I used AAS with her and that helped tremendously with her spelling. She was better able to hear the sounds and remember the correct spelling. AAS also helped build her confidence.

Ashley

says:

I am so glad i read this! This sounds a lot like my 4 year old daughter. She stuggles with sevearl of these charateristics of an APD learner. I’m getting ready to start our first year of homeschooling and i have ordered the AAR pre level for my 4 year old and 5 year old that will be in kindergarten. I think my 5 year old will be ready for level 1 soon but wanted to start them out together and make sure I dont skip over anything he needs to know. I will definently be using these tips, these are good tips to use anyway for any child.
Thank you for developing this curriculum and sharing your knowledge. Looking forward to using AAR soon.

Michelle T

says:

We don’t struggle with this, but we do struggle with getting things done with 3 school aged kids plus a toddler and baby all together! :)

Heidi

says:

My boys are using AAR pre-reading program this year. Neither one has APD, but these tips can be helpful with most kids. I really like how easy the program is to teach with little parent prep time, & even at 6, my boys still love Ziggy. One of my boys struggles to remember the names of the letters but can sing the alphabet song & point to the appropriate letter. I am hopeful that they both will know the letters & sounds this year. They love the activities. ..rhyming, picture card games, etc.

Monica

says:

Thank you for the tips. They will definitely come in handy this year.

L

says:

We really like All About Spelling — it has helped in understanding spelling rules. We used a different program before and struggled there because the words were not placed in groups that used the same phonogram or followed the same spelling rules. It caused confusion and All About Spelling has helped. If only it would help the struggles in math…

Jocelyn

says:

We do not face this specific issue in our home, but like others have mentioned, these are good communication tips in general, as well.

S Suzuki

says:

I have a daughter with severe language and auditory processing issues. She had very severe Childhood Apraxia of Speech, and we had to work VERY HARD to even get her to talk. She is making significant progress with All About Reading (Completed level 1 and most of Level 2 in one year, after stalling out in previous programs) and is beginning All About Spelling. I am working especially to present information visually because this is not my natural thinking mode, and yet sometimes it is definitely the best “mode” for her to learn. I do appreciate that much of the work is done for me with this program.

Teresa

says:

I have a struggling reader, but have seen some improvement since using AAR for about 5 months. These tips will be helpful. Thank you!

zekesmom10

says:

These are great tips even if your child doesn’t have SPD.

Amber

says:

Interesting. My middle child is struggling with hearing the different sounds so I will be trying some of your tips.

Lisa Allen

says:

I just received my All About Spelling books and am REALLY looking forward to our first full year homeschooling! My daughter reads slowly, but well, but her decoding skills and spelling are about a year or so behind. I am sure we will have a great year with this program!

Colleen Schaeffer

says:

I have been using SWR with my oldest son for four years but it wasn’t a great fit for my second son last year. I’m excited to try AAS this year.

Misty

says:

I don’t think any of my children have APD. I do have some who struggle with spelling though.

Katie

says:

I have at least one child who suffers from auditory processing disorder. He is high functioning autistic and I really appreciated reading all these tips and tricks for helping him learn.

Tanya Hanson-Meier

says:

I just left another post on the giveaway site. I had really expensive neuropsych testing done on my fifteen year old and in 5th grade he had a tutor that used another Orton-Gillingham program that got him from a 3rd grade level in reading to an 8th grade level. But we were not able to continue the program because the teacher moved away and the high costs of the tutoring fee!
Now his reading is going backwards and he is considered to be down to a 6th grade level! How or what should I do to stop this downward slide in his reading abilities! He also is avoiding reading as much as possible again!
Another teacher said he has some aspects of dyslexia, but that he is not dyslexic1 I am so confused!

Ilka Schumacher

says:

Hi,
I am special dyslexia teacher. I just can tell you, either someone has dyslexia or not. There is of course a big difference between dyslexia caused by genetic factors and reading/spelling difficulties caused by other reasons like a delayed development, missed lesson, ADD and so on. In these case children jjust have to caught up spelling rules, blending and so on. But children with dyslexia struggle with more deeper deficits like APD or visual visual processing deficits. For instance they are not able to remember the letter order in words, to differ between simililar letters like p b d or m n w. So when they try to read they see a letter but they might not remember is it a w. or a m and it takes them very long to recognise the word. I just can encourage you to read about it on the official homepage of the American dyslexia association. I for myself work as well with the AFS method. I think AAR and AAS are great for improving although I couldn’t test it yet because I live in Germany and we can’t get it here

Merry

says:

Hi Tanya,

That is a lot of confusing information, how frustrating. Some questions to consider:

Was this teacher just going off of what she saw in class, or did she do any testing (and does she have any qualifications for doing testing and making a diagnosis?) If not, her opinion doesn’t change what the neuropsych evaluation uncovered.

Was the same reading test performed both times? If the tests were put out by different companies, and/or if the conditions were different (for example, if one test was done individually, in a quiet room, and another was done in a room with other students), that can make a huge difference.

Was the previous grade-level equivalent determined through testing the tutor did? If it was instead a regular standardized test, those results can be confusing as well. “Eighth Grade Equivalency” in a subject can mean that your child answered those questions as well as the average eighth grader would answer them–which isn’t the same as a child doing eighth grade work. The type of testing done each time can drastically alter how you view them (it’s possible his reading level remained consistent but just isn’t what you thought it was before, for example).

Regardless–it sounds like your son was doing well with Orton-Gillingham based remediation and had made some significant gains, but that he wasn’t able to complete it. So, I would start there. I would try to figure out which skills and concepts he’s solid on, and go back to fill in any gaps on concepts that he hasn’t retained, and then finish out the course. You could do this using the program your tutor used if that’s available, or we could help you decide where he would place in our levels.

Generally when a student doesn’t want to read, it’s because reading is still “work” for him. If he has issues with fluency, has gaps in his phonogram knowledge, doesn’t have good word-attack skills for reading larger words, tends to rely on word-guessing strategies, or has vocabulary issues, reading won’t be very fun or interesting. Working on those areas of struggle would be the way to help him in that case.

Motivation can also be an issue. Help him discover a new hobby (or help him develop an existing hobby). If he likes cacti, check out books from the library on cacti. If he likes rocketry or models, get a kit and read the instructions together. Let him pick out an age-appropriate magazine on a topic that is interesting to him. These types of activities can help students find the motivation to learn to read.

Sometimes technology gets in the way and can be an issue–reading takes more patience than the instant reward of TV, video, and computer games. Limiting that can help students find other ways to entertain themselves.

Modeling good reading habits can help. Have time each day when you read so that he sees how much you value reading.

Reading aloud to a child is also a great way to develop an interest in reading. Choose high-quality novels that appeal to his age and interests–something that’s a page-turner. I actually still read to my teenagers, and it’s a wonderful time to share conversation together over a good book.

Also consider audio books. There are a lot of good stories, novels, and plays on CD. That can help students who struggle with reading gain vocabulary and comprehension skills. Their knowledge-base continues to grow and isn’t held back by their reading struggles.

I hope this gives you some ideas!

Marlo

says:

Vey informative. My son struggles with this and I appreciate the tips and information.

AA

says:

One of my kids reads 2 grade levels ahead but her spelling is atrocious! We have just begun using AAS. I have high hopes that it will help her!

kristen

says:

This is really interesting to think about. Spelling is one of my children s hardest subjects

Rachel

says:

I’ve never heard of APD. But I’m glad I am aware now, and might be able to pass on this info to someone that might need it. One struggle in our homeschooling is working on one’s own.

Jessica Evans

says:

How well written! Lots of good advice. We don’t struggle with APD but we do sometimes have issues with attention. We break out Lavendar oil for focus and it seems to work almost immediately!

R Goff

says:

We don’t struggle with APD, but my oldest struggles with spelling & reading. I have utilized All About Spelling and it has turned her world around. Spelling finally makes sense and reading comes so much easier.

Traci

says:

No APD, but focus can be a struggle at times. With 3 young children at home, I often have to remind myself to be patient because they aren’t always able to comprehend everything as quickly as I think they will.

JG

says:

Thank you for the informative article. I was not aware of this processing disorder.

Laura Dodd

says:

My son doesn’t struggle with APD, but he has had Apraxia (not being able to say what you are thinking). Thankfully going to speech the last 3 years has helped a lot!

Helpful information. Some of the learners in our adult literacy program struggle with this disorder. Typically they have spent a lifetime feeling stupid, irresponsible and inadequate. So much better to catch this young.

Merry

says:

How sad, Susan! Yes, so much better to catch issues when they are young.

Wendy Pierce

says:

My children do not struggle with APD. My biggest struggle has been retraining my child in reading. He went to public school for a couple of years and was taught whole word guessing. It has been a challenge to get him to let go of guessing. But AAR has been such tremendous help in our succeeding. I just love your program!

Chris Mayne

says:

I have thoroughly enjoyed AAS with my oldest child, & now that my middle is starting kindergarten we are going to try using AAR. I’m sure it will be just as helpful to us as the spelling program has been.

Hannah

says:

Both my girls struggled with reading. Now they can both read, but need a lot of help with their spelling. Believe All About Spelling is the answer!!

Yolanda B.

says:

Thankfully we do not struggle with APD, however we do struggle with staying focused. This is a great article with awesome tips!!

Jodi

says:

Having 5 young kids at home and homeschooling 4 of them we struggle with keeping focus and interruptions. Ordered All About Spelling for everyone hoping to “start fresh” in spelling this year since we haven’t focused on it too much.

Hi, we haven’t had our child tested yet. Which is going to be a struggle financially. The school won’t do it until she failing. She struggles with spelling. She reads like crazy. She has a speech problem. She speaks with a lisp. We had her in classes for this for 4 years. She did well until she had a teacher with an accent and then she stopped saying words correctly again. She is going into grade six. She also has trouble with math and is almost more frustrated with math that spelling. She can spell words sometimes on tests. If the test is directly done after the words have been worked with. But if the teacher waits 2-3 days she can’t spell several of the words correctly. Also she seems to spell words wrong while writing on stories. Her spelling becomes really poor when she is concentrating hard on writing her thoughts down. Then she is too frustrated to see and correct the mistakes. This summer we worked on spelling city, reflex math and mobymax. Reflex gets her speed and accuracy in mental math working better. Spelling city lets her play with the words in several games which seems to really help. I can always tell when she has skipped the games and just tries to spell the words. Also found out she was low in iron. She is now at my doctors request on iron syrup. I have also modified her diet to keep tract of the iron intake. Apparently this was causing her headaches and is also know to cause children to get every germ that is going around, which in turn causes more iron deficiency. Its complicated. I blame this on the bullying she endured in grade 3. It has been a long process. The poor kid goes to school all day and then I home school her at night and all summer. That is probably why she is a B student, mostly. So i am thinking maybe some of your products are the answer. We shall have to see how things work out.

Mary Walker

says:

My son has apraxia and is testing low cognitively, going into K. I think there are other issues going on as well- it is SOOOOO encouraging to read all of these helps! Thank you!!

Julie

says:

We struggle with being able to focus on lessons while dealing with the distractions that come with having 5 small children.

Lorri

says:

One of my sons has dyslexia and dysgraphia. I’m hopeful that this program will work for him. We are starting it in a few weeks!

Amber Milsap

says:

Awesome ideas.

Michele

says:

Great ideas!

Jocelyn

says:

I struggle with interruptions from little ones as well. You left some great ideas after another comment; thank-you. :)

Tricia

says:

My son struggles with this. I have used many of Diane Craft’s learning suggestions as well as AAS and AAR. We are still struggling through reading, but he is making small steps!

Jennifer

says:

I have one child with SPD and encoding difficulties. AAS seems to be helping my child learn to spell :)

Pyra

says:

More showing, less telling. That is great advice for all teaching!

Kelly

says:

We struggle with consistency and scheduling. It is hard balancing everything for 3 kids.

Kristine Ferriman

says:

No apd, but we do have 2 with ADHD, and one of my sons has an anxiety disorder in conjunction. They are constantly fidgety, and need frequent breaks, and even do their work while standing up sometimes.

Jillian

says:

My son doesn’t have apd.

Katie

says:

My children don’t have APD. We struggle with consistency and staying focused at the different times we need to home school. My husband works a rotating night shift schedule so we have to be very flexible with what we do so the kids can spend time with their dad.

Donna Pitts

says:

Children cannot officially be diagnosed with APD until the age of 7.

Bird

says:

This is an excellent article. Many of the techniques that you mentioned are things that I use with my kids daily (both of mine non speaking autistics with this issue) and they work! I’m going to have to check out the AAR and AAS programs for homeschooling this year! Thanks!

Kathy

says:

I don’t think we struggle with APD as much as some issues of ADHD. Some characteristics seem similar. I think the manipulatives in this program are great ideas!

Meghan F

says:

I’m not certain of my child has APD, but AAR may have headed off some problems in that area. Regardless, the tips here are helpful for me.

Joyce

says:

I don’t know that my 5yo has APD, but she does have a lot of the signs of it. Inattentiveness is a major one. We will be starting K next week, and I think the biggest difference from what I did with my older one is to have her work in shorter spans of time with breaks in-between.

Amanda Beachum

says:

My child struggles with absence seizures and associated memory problems. Repetition is key to success in our home school.

Katrina Gleason

says:

I had never heard of APD before. Good article about what it is and how to help.

Jenna

says:

I have to be careful not to overwhelm my son and only give one, precise direction at a time.

Dana

says:

Still not certain if one of my six has APD….but I do love AAS and how it has helped improve her reading abilities!

kimberly

says:

SPD here with a 6 year old

Cristina

says:

This is very new to me. Good to know.
Thanks for the information.

Michelle Harding

says:

I have never heard of APD but now wonder of this could be a reason why one of my sons has had so much difficulty.

Michelle Harding

says:

I struggle with one of my twin boys in the area of listening and comprehending- first grade left us both frustrated. I have never heard of this but am definitely going to research this further.

Lynn

says:

We just love all about spelling it really helped my child with APD as well as my other children with dyslexia. I have been hoping to add All about reading to our resources for my five year old who is showing strong indicators of APD.

Ashley

says:

My boy struggles with listening, he’s always day dreaming.

Anne

says:

My children don’t have APD, but I do struggle with keeping us on schedule when homeschooling.

Lori

says:

I have suspected a slight APD with my daughter who is 9. At first I attributed it to choice (couldn’t hear me while watching TV! lol) but now she has shown difficulty with comprehension. I have been using AllAbout Spelling with her since the beginning. I started my son with All About Reading and am considering using it for her as well to review the basics.

Brandi

says:

I have three children that are on the Autism Spectrum, and being able to process directions, etc. is a big problem for them as well. We have found that if we have them look toward us (eye contact is an issue sometimes), and keep our directions/instructions brief and clear that we have better success. This curriculum sounds amazing!

Dora

says:

I don’t have a child with APD. I do have four children and I have struggled with finding the right method and fit for each child because they are all so different!

matt

says:

Thank you for the opportunity to learn more about educating my children.

Bobbi

says:

My youngest, age 8, seems to be struggling with APD as well as some visual issues. She could not learn to read with straight phonics but has had success in the last year by combining some phonics with some full word learning. Being able to read has helped with understanding, though, as she now reads along whenever possible so she can follow the ideas better. However, we continue to struggle on the phonics front as she tries to read longer words but can’t seem to break them into sounds for decoding.

The same struggle exists with spelling as she can’t seem to break down the sounds or distinguish different but similar sounds. We downloaded your apps to her Kindle Fire so she can practice hearing in a quiet place all by herself. This seems to slowly be helping. As you mentioned, we stumbled upon watching my lips while I speak and this helps. But just today I was trying to say “Dawn” and “Don” (female & male names) to her and she cannot distinguish them. She actually accused me of trying to trick her into thinking they are different!

Her spelling may be horrible at this point but she still writes notes to herself often. She came up with this as a tool to help her remember what she’s been asked to do or just clarify an idea. We are planning to begin AAS tho help with spelling but she struggles with hearing the sounds. I think progress will be much slower than when her sisters used the program. I’m hoping, though, that endurance will win the prize in the end. Would adding AAR to the equation help by reinforcing concepts? She’s already reading early chapter books so I know level one would not be the place to start.

Merry

says:

Hi Bobbi,

You might find it helpful, because she would get the concepts first in reading, and then reinforce them later in phonics.

For reading, you don’t actually have to start with Level 1, the way you do with spelling. You can use the placement tests to see where she would be: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-placement/

So, take a look at those, and then check out the level that she would place in and see what you think–here’s a link to the online samples for AAR: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-lesson-samples/

Dawn and Don ARE very similar (and I know people who pronounce them the same!). Something I found helpful with my kids was to compare short O to “ahhhh” as in the doctor says, “say Ahhhh.”

And then the “aw” to something like, “Awww, what a cute bunny.”

HTH some! Merry :-)

Jocelyn

says:

Yes, I would totally say that Dawn and Don are the same!! :)

Merry

says:

(oops, meant to say she would get the concepts first in reading, and reinforce them later in spelling.)

Stephanie F

says:

Very interesting and useful information! My boys don’t have APD, but I imagine some of the tips will still be helpful for my energetic, easily distracted kiddos.

Lindsey C.

says:

I had not heard of APD before reading this blog entry, and as a current user of All About Reading and a former classroom teacher, I can say that AAR is an excellent choice for learners of all abilities. We struggle with paying attention in our homeschool (my daughter is a daydreamer), but the short, concise verbiage and multisensory activities helped us “strike gold” with a reading program (AAR was the third one we tried, and it’s the one we’re sticking with!).

Laurie

says:

My child doesn’t struggle quite like this, but the tips were still helpful with what we are dealing with.

Andrea

says:

We aren’t dealing with any APD issues, but we love All About Spelling! My 7yo flew through level one in the spring, and we are getting ready to start level two. This year’s struggle is going to be teaching a 2nd grader and a kindergartener. I know it can be done, but it will be new for us. I’m praying for wisdom and patience!

Stefani

says:

Thankfully, I don’t think we’re dealing with any auditory issues… despite the fact that my kids often don’t hear me (or, rather, listen to me) and my 6 year old boy is easily distracted… but it sure helps for him to play his All About Reading games–he’s always engaged for those! :)

Amancia

says:

Of our 3 kids, one is in PS, one in homeschooled and one is in preschool. None of them have APD but our youngest does have social communication disorder. As for challenges in homeschooling, ours is staying consistent while meeting each child’s unique needs. This means commuting one out of district, commuting the youngest in the opposite direction to a preschool that accepts him and offers a program where he can thrive, and in between all that driving, getting our homeschool lessons in on too of homeschool classes and extras like tae kwon do and piano.

Jarica

says:

Neither of my children have an auditory processing disorder, but we us AAR and AAS and it has been a wonderful program.

Aimee

says:

My son may have APD, and dyslexia, but has also tested for visual tracking and eye muscle problems. Before we started Level 1 AAR, he would feel frustrated any time we tried to pick up reading. Now he made it through Level 1, and the other day, read a street sign to me! I have been so thankful for this program!!

Traci

says:

None of my children have been diagnosed with APD, but All About Spelling has been great for my daughter who is 7 and still has a very difficult time gripping her pen. She spells words like a champ with the visuals of the board and I am thankful for this curriculum.

Theresa

says:

Honestly, one of the most helpful things we’ve done has been to allow my child to use the All About Spelling Phonogram sounds CD or app for sounds that have taken a while to master. I have her click three times to listen, then three times to repeat the sound verbally after the recording, then three times of saying it herself first followed by the recording to check.

Another thing that has helped has been helping her pay attention to the shape of the mouth for certain sounds…trying to feel it while speaking, and looking in a mirror.

Heidi

says:

Thank you for the list of tips! Hope it helps an older child too!

Lakisha

says:

My middle child was diagnosed with APD last year. We were so greatful to have a diagnoses. Having a diagnoses and learning what works for her helped. Thanks for the information

Karen Wallace

says:

Could you tell me what type of doctor specialist diagnosed your child? I suspect one of ours has it and would like to have him tested. Thanks.

Merry

says:

Karen, you might try looking for an audiologist.

Karen Wallace

says:

Thank you Merry,
From what I understand so far, would it be true that someone with APD would comprehend and retain information that they read (like written instructions or text in a book)? I also saw a comment by someone that they may need more repetition for them to comprehend. If that’s true, would that be only in the case of oral instruction or is there something else about the disorder that causes the need for more repetition than normal even in the case of written or illustrated instruction? I’m asking because now I’m looking at math (algebra) for him. Thanks for your continued help!

Lakisha

says:

My middle child was diagnosed with APD last year. We were so greatful to have a diagnoses. Thanks for the information

Lexi

says:

So far none of my children have been diagnosed with APD. However, my son has difficulty with focus and eye tracking when he’s reading. We’ve been using AAR with him and he’s making progress with reading and he’s very proud of himself! He can’t wait to be an independent reader!

Jennifer S

says:

no APD here, but our biggest struggle is diligent use of time. My 8 year old is a dawdler.

Lesley

says:

This was a very helpful article for me. I see all of these signs of an auditory processing disorder in my son, but never realized that was what he was struggling with. I always wondered why he had such a hard time hearing in a room where there were other voices and noises. We’ve been using the AAR and AAS programs this year and have seen some progress with his reading and spelling. Thank you for all the help! Please keep these articles coming!!

Jennifer Park

says:

I have actually never heard of APD–but I feel like I’ve hit the jackpot! This sounds so like my daughter. We’ll be starting to use AAS this fall, and I am so excited.

Terri

says:

Not sure if my child has this disorder or not, but I am glad for exposure to information about it!

Amber Wright

says:

Thank you so much for this article!

Jaime Schmidt

says:

Can putting verbal communication in to more rhyme or song be helpful?

Merry

says:

Rhyme and song can make things more memorable for some children, but they don’t necessarily make the sounds clearer or easier to understand. When we sing, we tend to blend sounds even more than when we speak, which can make it harder to delineate the individual words. For example, a line from Jingle Bells, “On a one-horse, open sleigh” can easily sounds like “On a one-horse, soap and sleigh,” creating more confusion.

Virginia

says:

My ds pediatrician wants my son tested for adhd/add. His audiologist suggested testing for apd….not sure which to do. The “symptoms” seem very similar.

Merry

says:

Hi Virginia,

The symptoms ARE very similar, and it can be difficult to weed through. (To compound matters, it is possible for a person to have both). Sometimes getting to the bottom of a child’s learning struggles is like peeling an onion–you find things out one layer at a time. Personally, I would be tempted to test for APD first and try some of the helps for that. See how much progress you see by going that route. You can also add in some of the natural helps and accommodations commonly used for ADHD–ADDitude Magazine online has some good articles, though it can take some time to sift through. Some tips I’ve read there and elsewhere for ADHD:

Make sure your child has enough exercise–time to run off energy before lessons can be helpful.
Green time–outside with grass, trees etc… is important for all kids, but especially kids with ADD
Protein at every meal
Zinc and magnesium can be important, and at least one study has found that 84% of kids with ADHD have low iron levels–that’s easy enough to check.
cutting out artificial colors, dyes etc… and artificial flavorings–read labels carefully.
Omega 3’s

Then, if you are still seeing significant issues and don’t think you are making headway, test for ADHD and consider whether medicine is a route to take. For those kids who need it, meds can make a huge difference. It can take time to find the right one though.

multivitamin.
Some kids are low in vit. B, and that can affect thinking.

Katie

says:

Good article with good information. I agree there are many components of AAR/AAS that could be very helpful for children with APD.

Jessica

says:

Just getting ready to start preschool with my son so biggest challenge right now is figuring out what to do.

Salina

says:

Great article! So much good info for parents searching for info and inspiration.

Jenn

says:

My children do not have APD, but my 2nd son has proven to be quite a different learner than my daughter and 1st son. It took us over a year for him to finally recognize all of his letters – and I accomplished that by coming up with letter look-alike hand and/or body motions. Now we’re moving onto learning how to read – fun stuff.

Jenny

says:

DS has ASD, pretty high-functioning and at or above developmentally. The BIGGEST thing he deals with is auditory processing delays. I’m thrilled to see this blog post! It’s really, really good timing cuz we’re just about to buy a new reading curriculum and want something with a bigger focus on phonics even though I know that’s going to be hard for him.

dana

says:

I don’t know if my daughter has APD, but she didn’t hear sounds and do well with auditory exercises. When we sarted using All About Reading with the scripted visual activities that included the letter tiles she took off. Thanks All About Reading.

Jennifer

says:

Our biggest struggle is occupying the little ones so we can focus on schoolwork.

Merry

says:

Yes, that can be a challenge!

I found it helped if I did something with my youngest first–otherwise she was always vying for my attention! Then I kept bins of activities just for those times I needed to work one on one with my oldest–blocks, manipulatives, puzzles, dress-up items, dolls, cars, a large, shallow box with dried beans and a dumptruck to make road-ways etc…, lacing beads, play dough, a sink half-full of water with some spoons and bowls–she loved to pour and dump & water is easy to clean up if it spills!

Then I would rotate the bins so there was something new/interesting each day.

Larger families sometimes find it helpful to rotate an older child to play with younger ones while mom works with another child.

Lisa Imerman

says:

I don’t think my child has APD, but he does have some learning challenges. He tends to be an auditory learner, if he reads it, he has a hard time getting it to stick in his brain, but if he hears it, he grasps it much better. We have found that All About Spelling being multi-sensory, has helped wonders. Audio books are something we are looking into for this year too.

Rayanne

says:

I just started using All about Spelling with my older two children. After using it for three weeks, I have decided to start using it with my child who has speech delays and problems with memory. I think it will be simple and short enough to keep his attention span.

Christine

says:

My daughter does not have APD but she does have sensory challenges. Our biggest struggle is the distractions of noise for her. Her hearing is phenomenal so sounds are hard to tune out, she can hear things I can’t even hear and everyday sounds are amplified.

Merry

says:

Have you ever tried noise-cancelling headphones for her?

Jennifer mathesz

says:

my son doesn’t have an auditory processing disorder but for him it’s a matter of just sitting still long enough for a short lesson. In our home, we need short lessons with lots of hands-on activities.

Ranae

says:

My oldest has dyslexia and struggles daily with his studies.

kelly grundhofer

says:

My son struggled for a while with having fluid behind his ear drum. It has caused a delay in his speech and also it makes it difficult for him to differentiate between the sounds. There are a lot of great tip here that I could try with him, thanks.

Cryss

says:

My son’s speech is delayed but with AAR/AAS and speech therapy we’ve seen major leaps in his abilities. It sounds simple but… just being able to watch him have a conversation with someone and have them understand without me having to translate has been wonderful. I’m excited to see what differences will occur by this time next year.