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Real Dads, Real Kids: Using AAR with a Gifted Learner

Real Dads Real Kids - Using All About Reading with a Gifted Learner with Matthew Vinson

We have shared many posts about using All About Reading with children who have special needs, and we love sharing those stories. But there’s a group of special learners that we don’t hear about quite as often: gifted learners.

Gifted learners have special needs, too, but the needs of gifted learners are quite different than those of other special learners.

Generally, gifted kids need to progress faster, they need to make big leaps, they need to be able to interact with content on a deeper level, and they aren’t willing to put up with shallowness or inconsistencies. Though on the surface these may sound like “good problems” to have, they can make it very challenging to choose a curriculum for a gifted learner.

So when we heard from Matthew Vinson, the father of a gifted little boy, and he mentioned that his son had finished all four levels of the All About Reading program in just over a year, I was eager to hear more.

And when I saw his video of five-year-old Kobe reading When Dinosaurs Lived: Velociraptor by Kate Riggs, I knew I had to ask Matthew to share Kobe’s story with our readers.

Here’s Matthew…

Kobe’s story begins when he was around 1 1/2 years old.

I always said that I was going to start teaching my kids at a young age so that they would have an advantage through school. We started with some animal flash cards. I would show him the pictures, say the name, and tell him a few facts about each one. It wasn’t long before he started identifying and pronouncing the names and facts clearly for animals such as rhinoceros, walrus, toucan, and more. I was amazed by how fast and easy it was for him. At the time, I didn’t know how unusual it was for a one-year-old to be able to say these things.

After the animals, I started on numbers 1–100, and within a couple of weeks, he had number recognition down. Then I moved on to letters, and within a few days, he had those down as well.

After the letters, I was starting to realize that I had a smart one on my hands. He loved it, so we ran with it. That Christmas he received an easel, and from that point on, we tackled everything—the solar system, states and capitals, presidents, money, multiplication, decimals, division, food chain, measurements—just about everything we could think of. Except for reading.

I love to read, but wasn’t too excited about teaching it. I like to fully understand something before I can teach it. Just because you know how to read, doesn’t mean you understand the rules for reading. My wife, Tiffany, suggested I quit stalling and start reading. We both knew he was eager to learn and that the timing was right.

Real Dads, Real Kids: Using AAR with a Gifted Learner

But like I said before, I wanted to fully understand reading before I would teach it. I began to research how to teach kids to read—every bit of information I could find, but I was disappointed in what I was finding. By this time, I was probably more confused than I had been before. The information I found seemed to contradict itself and just created a lot of confusion. Still determined, I kept searching and finally resorted to creating my own reading curriculum.

Then one day I was researching phonograms and stumbled on a company called All About Learning Press. As I researched the programs that AALP offered, it seemed to be exactly what I was looking for. And the more I researched it, the more convinced I became. So I ordered All About Reading Level 1—trying not to expect too much, because it just seemed too good to be true.

A few days later I received the curriculum, and standing there flipping through pages, I was amazed. It turned out to be the godsend I was searching for. It had everything I imagined.

Kobe was eager to get started, so we started immediately after receiving it. Kobe loved it…from day one all the way to the end. It took him fourteen months to complete all four levels. We did every lesson. We flew through Level 1, completing about three lessons each day. In Levels 2–4, Kobe was able to complete one or two lessons each day, with each lesson taking between 20–30 minutes. He was five years old when he completed Level 4.

Real Dads, Real Kids: Using AAR with a Gifted Learner

It was the greatest discovery. This curriculum company has all the answers for reading. Every public school should have to integrate this program into their curriculum, because what the schools offer is a joke compared to All About Reading.

Kobe just turned six. He’s in kindergarten and will never have to worry about reading. He can decode pretty much any word that there is. I couldn’t have been more pleased with this program!

Thank you, Marie Rippel and team! Keep up the extraordinary work. I recommend you to everyone I know!

Here’s What I Love about Matthew and Kobe’s Story:

  • Matthew identified his son’s gift for academic learning early on. This is so helpful for preventing frustration.
  • Matthew also recognized the Curse of Knowledge—just because you know how to do something doesn’t mean that you know how to teach it.
  • Even though Kobe was obviously a gifted learner, Matthew didn’t leave learning to chance—he researched and sought out a reading program that met his rigorous specifications.
  • He respected his son’s unique learning timetable.

Products Matthew used with Kobe:

Did you enjoy Matthew and Kobe’s story? Read more stories from Real Moms (and Dads).

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Leave a Comment

Ashley fontes

says:

My son is very smart, I am not sure if he is “gifted” in reading. He understood the alphabet and sounds early on due to ASL but had no desire to read till about 2 months ago, when I ordered AAR. He just turned 5, and I homeschool him. While he enjoys the book lessons he excels in the stories and decoding words through blending is what he wants to do. So we just finished the first vol. I’m Level 1, but I am afraid he is going to miss something by not doing the book lessons. I am thinking of going back to complete what we missed, but I don’t want to slow him down, as he is excited to read every day, and can’t wait for the new book. What are your suggestions?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Ashley,
I don’t want to repeat everything we discussed on Facebook, but I did want to leave at least some reply to your question so that no one thought I missed it or ignored you. Keep up the great work with your son!

Thank you. I appreciate you answering here as well. Understanding an anxious parent. :)

Anne

says:

We are in a similar situation: our son began reading at 3… he just figured it out with no instruction. I’m a certified elementary teacher and language specialist and I didn’t even realize he was reading… my grandmother is the one who noticed! When he was 5 he started Kindergarten (homeschool) and that’s when we started AAR. Because he was so young I did decide to slow him down going through the levels; I was not holding him back, exactly, but we did not race through as quickly as he could. Now, at age six and part way through the first grade, he is working on Level 3.

I found the benefit to slowing him down was it gave me more time to supplement with other things. For example, when he reads a poem in the reader he then gets out his notebook and writes his own poem using the same (or similar) meter, rhyme scheme or theme. Then types it out and emails it to his grandparents. He loves it because he has been writing for fun since he was four and I figure there’s no need to rush.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Anne,
It sounds like you have found the right balance between moving forward as fast as your son can, and holding back because he is so young. Thank you for sharing how you have made AAR work with your young, gifted learner. Keep up the amazing work!

question

says:

Why is he in Kindergarten at age six? Shouldn’t he be in 1st grade…especially consider that he was so advanced?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kobe turned 6 while in kindergarten. The vast majority of kids start kindergarten at age 5 but will have their 6th birthday sometime during the year. That is what happened to Kobe.

As for why he wasn’t put into an advanced grade, I don’t know. That decision would be up to Kobe’s parents and the school he is attending (if he isn’t homeschooled). I do know the decision is a complex one, and many have good reasons for choosing not to place their academically advanced young student into a higher grade.

Teresa

says:

How inspiring! My struggling reader is 10 and just starting level 2. It has taken him 3 years. Sure wish he were gifted.

Anne

says:

Please don’t wish that! I have not had to deal with my own struggling readers yet (but I have 2 more kids who haven’t started school yet so we’ll see), but I taught both elementary and high school before I had children and I saw many children who had a lot of difficulty reading.

The students I taught in high school who flew through elementary school with no difficulties sometimes didn’t have the skills they needed to handle more difficult work. They didn’t have the perseverance to work at something that wasn’t easy for them and sometimes they were so puffed up in their own minds that they wouldn’t ask for help when they needed it. Sometimes it’s in the struggle that we learn things like perseverance or how to help others who are having trouble. My husband is now a high school chemistry teacher… but he was a poor chemistry student in high school. That struggle has helped him know WHY kids have difficulty with the material and HOW to teach it in a clear way.

So be encouraged! Go through the AAR levels at his own pace. Encourage him to work hard and rejoice over small successes… because if through this difficulty he learns to be a hard worker that will serve him well all his life. Oh, and the learning doesn’t end with the student… Mom and Dad (or the teacher!) have lots to learn too!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Anne,
Thank you so much for taking the time to leave this comment.

There are benefits of being a struggling learner, and there are drawbacks of being a gifted one. I, too, have seen gifted learners flounder, and all too often completely give up, the first time things are difficult. I’ve known kids that excelled right through high school and had amazing SAT scores change their majors in their freshman year of college because the classes were too hard. I have also seen kids that have always struggled continue to struggle to success in their chosen major. There is something unmeasurable learned from struggling then succeeding at reading and spelling.

Marlee

says:

I have a gifted or bright child and this post caught my attention. It’s important to me that even a child who excels still gets the basics to build upon. AAR and AAS look like they do that.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Marlee,
As this post shows, advanced students do well with AAR and AAS for the same reason struggling students do well. Both programs are designed to be used at the individual student’s pace, so you can go as fast or as slow as the student needs to master the material.

Let us know if we can answer any questions, help with placement, or anything else.

Anna

says:

My kindergartener is reading chapter books (e.g. Little House on the Prairie, Narnia, etc.) We had casually helped her learn to read at age 3 without a curriculum, and she has naturally progressed by reading voraciously and independently. She joins 1st graders at school for the AAR level 1, but it’s too easy. However, I don’t know where her gaps are because we didn’t start with a curriculum. Any suggestions? We are also doing AAS level 1 independently at home, which is going well.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Anna,
With advanced readers like your daughter, we recommend using All About Spelling to fill any gaps she might have developed. You might find aspects of the higher levels of AAR helpful to her, such as when it gets into literary analysis topics like conflict, hyperbole, and point of view, but she will be fine filling in any phonogram gaps through learning spelling.

So, my suggestion is to keep up with AAS 1 at home, and possibly see if you can get her moved up to a higher reading level at school or even just have a study period or something during that hour.

Keep up the great work!

Marie

says:

Thank-you for this post. We are strongly suspecting that our first grader is gifted. We started him out with AAS level 1 in kindergarten when he was spontaneously spelling three letter words out loud. In less than 9 months, with summer vacation in between, he has completed levels 1 &2 with about 98% retention and accuracy and is eager to move onto the next level. He also just completed AAR level 2, and is eager to move on to level 3. He is also reading books that interest him, and applying the skills learned in this program while sounding out new words. This program has been fantastic for him, as it has given him the skills to know how to both decode and encode words on his own. A question I have though, is we are getting feedback from other people to hold him back a little, and not allow him to advance to quickly due to his young age. I am doing other subjects such as history, geography and science with him, but in regards to this program, do I allow him to start level 3 in the new year, or should I give him supplementary and enrichment materials instead? I really don’t think I am going to be able to hold him back when it comes to reading, as this is something that he really enjoys and is now doing on his own, and advancing his skills the more he reads.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Marie,
We don’t recommend holding a student back in All About Reading and All About Spelling if he is ready to move forward. There really isn’t a benefit in doing so. If he is ready for level 3, move into level 3.

LA

says:

Very cool to see how this may work with a gifted child. Thanks for the article!

Amy

says:

Thanks! Looking into using AAR with my son. I think he would love it!

Cheree

says:

I am excited to be start homeschooling my children as of 2016 (two of them are currently finishing the year at their current school in Australia – one in Preschool, the other in Kindergarten). I love that I will be able to teach them at their own pace of learning, rather than being held back or struggling to keep up the pace with the schedule in the classroom!

Ellen G

says:

I’ve never tried your products, but love how this story illustrates the diversity of them. We are really considering incorporating AAS into our curriculum.

Lee Ann

says:

Thanks for sharing how AAR helps different kids.

Melissa

says:

I have been looking at AAR and AAS for my son. Would love to give them a try.

Roxy

says:

I have used these materials with both of my kids from the time they were little(er) and they work very well with those that are quick-paced learners. Mine are thriving on it!

Jo

says:

Great post
I’m really thinking of how this program might work with my wriggly learners!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Jo,
All About Reading works very well with wriggly ones! The daily work is short and sweet; we recommend just 20 minutes a day, and if that is too long you could divide it into two 10 minute lesson or just one 15 minute lesson. The program contains fun, hands-on components and activities that keep students engaged. The readers are very motivating, as they are “real books” that are hardbound with beautiful illustrations. And we highly recommend making review as fun as possible. Here is a blog post full of fun and active review ideas.

Lastly, we have a one-year “Go Ahead and Use It” 100% guarantee.

Miranda

says:

I totally have the curse of knowledge! I have never thought about it like that, but it takes me a while to figure out how to teach something, even though I know it. Great points!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Miranda,
I have loved learning the term “curse of knowledge”; naming something helps you to be able think through it better.

Tara Shaver

says:

It’s great to see that this program works for many different kinds of children. My daughter is 5 and knows how to read but is easily distracted and lacks motivation to practice her skills. I wonder if this program would work for her?

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Tara,
All About Reading likely would work well for your daughter. The daily work is short and sweet; we recommend just 20 minutes a day, and if that is too long for her you could divide it into two 10 minute lesson or just one 15 minute lesson. The program contains fun, hands-on components and activities that keep students engaged. The readers are very motivating, as they are “real books” that are hardbound with beautiful illustrations. And we highly recommend making review as fun as possible. Here is a blog post full of fun and active review ideas.

Lastly, we have a one-year “Go Ahead and Use It” 100% guarantee.

Sharon Martin

says:

I have many friends who highly reccomended this to me!!

Sherry

says:

Thank you for sharing this story! I too have an early learner. She was reading fairly well as a two year old, and now at 5 she reads probably at a Junior High level. (It is so hard to test a 5 year old, because, well, they are still only 5. While she can read lots of words from a college text book, she still has the life experience of a 5 year old, therefore I really don’t know her reading level.) I started her on AAS when she was 4. She flew through it in a couple of months, when she probably could have completed it much more quickly. Now she is going through level 2, once again more slowly than she is capable of doing, this time being held back by circumstances outside of my control. I am so glad for this curriculum because it is giving her the reason behind what she already know to do intuitively. Thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sherry,
You brought up great point. Children can read years and years ahead, but life experience and maturity still plays a part in their ability to comprehend what they are reading. Your daughter may be able to read a story about driving a car, but it’s questionable that she would get as much out of it as a 16 year old because of life experience.

Thank you for sharing.

Melissa

says:

Love this story! My son was an early learner as well and it was amazing to see.

Kelly M

says:

What a fascinating story! Thank you for posting from real moms and dads.

Nicki

says:

My oldest is in kindergarten, but is working at a first-grade level. It is nice that we can move at her own pace through homeschooling.

Rebecca Armstrong

says:

THANK YOU! I have said for years that gifted children have special needs too. Now it’s officially in print. :-) My two older gifted children have successfully used AAS and now I am using it for my 3 adopted special needs children. Again, thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Rebecca,
You are welcome! :D And thank you for sharing that the same product has been successful for both your gifted children and your special needs children.

Elizabeth

says:

This looks like a good program. Would love to give it a try.

Stephanie

says:

This product looks good, and I have heard good review about it.

Susan G

says:

I’m relating a lot to this story – can’t wait to try AAR materials!

Kristin Evans

says:

Seems like a great product! Might need to give it a my with my boys!

Rebekah

says:

Wish this program was around when I taught my kids. We worked it out, but it could have been so much easier.

Rachel R

says:

This program looks like it would be great to use with my son.

Shannon

says:

What a wonderful story. While I wouldn’t classify my 6 year old son as a gifted student, he is most certainly an eager one! We are in Level 1 Reading now. This is truly a confidence building program. My son is proud that he can read the decoding books on his own and he is excited to move forward with the lessons. I would highly recommend this program to anyone!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Shannon,
Thank you for sharing your experiences with AAR with an eager student.

Cindy Gifford

says:

This is a very familiar story! Reading came easy and naturally for my first child at 3-4 yrs. My second child is 4. Numbers come easy and natural for her, but she seems to be memorizing certain letters and guessing words. I am eager to work through this reading program with her and give her a solid foundation. She seems to be running fast, learning without me! I am thankful for the systematic approach that can still be tailored to the individual child.

Kimberley Quinlan

says:

Using All About Spelling with our son who struggles with both dyslexia and dysgraphia has been so helpful! He enjoys spelling now!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kimberley,
This is great! Enjoying a subject makes a huge difference in learning success.

Emily

says:

The All About Reading Program is definitely my favorite one I’ve used with my children! They love it too!

Magela Gonzalez

says:

What a great story. Thank you for sharing.

Clare

says:

I love this curriculum!

Jessica S

says:

My son is gifted also! I love this article. And I love AAR!

Sherry

says:

I love reading stories like these!!!

Jen

says:

Love this! My daughter turned 5 in August and is an accelerated learner. I worried about letting her work too far ahead until I read somewhere to ignore ages and grades and just work at a level that is consistently challenging for the child.

She loves being able to put what she’s learning to use, which is why AAR’s approach with decodable stories is so great. It answers the “Why am I learning this?” before she needs to ask.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Jen,
You made an excellent point about putting what is being learned to immediate use. Thank you!

Laura

says:

Our 11 y.o. Has been homeschooled for all of her schooling except for 4th grade, at which time she was placed in an accelerated gifted classroom. Her reading skills and comprehension are very advanced, as well as her vocabulary, ability to define words and to spell. What is baffling to me, however, is her “sloppiness.” She rarely remembers to capitalize letters at the beginning of sentences or even proper nouns. Sometimes she will spell words incorrectly a.k.a. “creatively” simply because she gets bored, even though she knows how to spell them. She finished level 6 of AAS in two weeks and was upset at the “lack of challenging words” (I think it is just fine, by the way!). Math is her nemesis.

She has sensory processing difficulties and prefers to be alone, to be able to focus and concentrate. She is my first experience with homeschooling and I continuously feel as though I am trying to figure her out and what the best way to teach her is, along with her four younger siblings, who of course, all have their own unique learning styles as well!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Laura,
Have you seen our article on Dysgraphia? I’m not saying your daughter has it, but a few things you said did bring it to mind.

I wish I had an article that would make figuring your children’s unique learning needs easy, but I don’t. Hey, I recently asked for advice from my co-workers at here at AALP for my 5th child, because she is so hard to figure out. We have to do the best we can in the moment, and be willing to make changes as new insight comes to us.

Thank you for sharing about your daughter.

Laura

says:

Robin,
I did not read it. I will check it out. I will say we took her to a sensory learning center for an intense treatment of the vestibular, visual and auditory sensory centers. She is just now finishing the home part of the treatment, and today is the first day that we have seen some very encouraging results in the area of hearing hypersensitivity and tactile defensiveness.

However, something that did begin during the treatment and has continued, is her ability to do math in her head…prior to this she couldn’t even do simple addition in her head, and now she is doing multiplication and division in her head!!! Amazing!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

This is great, Laura. What a difference!

Cynthia

says:

Thank you for sharing
I have a 7 yo gifted son with strong emotional difficulties ( he gets overwhelmed by all his feelings.. And can not stand not being able to do something right away)
I purchased AAR level 1 when he was younger but he just wasn’t ready for it although he had the level, he just didn’t want to put his head into it and prefered learning about other stuffs like gravity and friction. What would make him frustrated is that he wanted to know more and for that he needed to read.
So one day he asked and we finished the whole level one in no time.
He loved the fact that he could read the AAR books by himself.
He would sit in the kitchen and read for me.
He is not fluent but he is heading there, some words are still hard to read but he still wants to improve.
I am thinking of buying the AAS and AAR2 now, we will see how these go with him..
Oh yes i forgot to mention that he is bilingual french and english and he fluently speaks both languages, now thanks to the AAR now he can read and write in both languages too.
People tend to think that being gifted means being super good at everything or not having difficulties.. But this is a misconception, they have abilities, true, but they mostly have a different way of processing informations, and understanding the world.
And unfortunately their way of learning and understanding is very different than the one they are expected to have in school. That’s why i chose to homeschool him, so he can learn his own way.

Marie Rippel

says:

You bring up some great points, Cynthia! Being gifted doesn’t mean not having struggles. Your son is fortunate to have you as his teacher! Going at your child’s individual pace is so important.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Cynthia,
Thank you very much for sharing about how your son learns.

There is such a wide range of “advanced”. It common for young advanced students to be more average in things like fine motor skills and attention span, and then there are children, often called “twice exceptional”, that may be advanced in one or more areas but have learning disabilities in one or more other areas. Learning in their own way really is the best for all of them.

Deborah

says:

I can relate to this story. Thank you for sharing. It is difficult to not sound like I am bragging about my child, but it is sometimes overwhelming for a parent to find something interesting and challenging for a gifted child. My son is 5-years-old and we are currently flying quickly through AAS Level 1 as he has a 3rd grade reading level. He started reading at 2. He was easily reading Beginner Books at age 3. He loves learning new things and gobbles up information. But the downside is that he is frustrated when I try to have him read to me as he’ll say that he already read it. He despises repetition for things he has mastered rather than the typical child who loves being handed easy tasks. He is the middle child of two more normal learners which definitely helps.

Marie Rippel

says:

Hi Deborah! Your comments could really benefit other parents who are looking for answers on how to teach their gifted child, so I appreciate that you took the time to share your experience. Best of luck in your continual search for the “interesting and challenging”! I’m glad that AAS has been a good match for your son.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Deborah,
Sometimes these advanced children can be more difficult to teach than others imagine, for the reasons you mentioned and more. Thank you for sharing about your 5 year old.

Sabrina

says:

Marie, thank you so much for sharing Kobe’s story! It’s important to demonstrate the applicability of the AAR curriculum for gifted children.

I’ve purchased AAR 1 and 2 to use with my task-avoidant perfectionist 4 year old son. He really needs to be challenged at his level but, as a young child, he needs the emotional support and confidence to take the leap to try new skills. He seems to have self-taught himself many phonemes from our many gods of logged read aloud stories, but I didn’t want to leave any gaps or have him develop sight word reading habits as a dominant reading strategy.

I love your manuals. They allow me to pre-read our “lessons” and telescope 10 lessons into one brief play based session at a time. We started level 1 4 days ago, and my son is so proud to have read through “Run Bug Run!”

Thank you for creating a curriculum that lends itself so well to individualization!

Sabrina

says:

Oops…typo! Many hours of read alouds…

Marie Rippel

says:

Thanks for sharing details on how you are using AAR with your son, Sabrina. Congratulations on finishing the “Run, Bug, Run” reader, and kudos for customizing the lessons for your specific situation!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sabrina,
Thank you for taking the time to share how AAR is working with your young, advanced child. I’m sure it will help another parent, or parents. It sounds like your son is doing great!

Sabrina

says:

Marie & Robin,

Thanks for your replies!

If I could make one recommendation on how to enhance the system, it would be to offer additional companion practice books, as that is my son’s favorite part of the program and they are consumed quickly. At $15-20 per treasury, I would happily buy gads of books from you just to keep feeding the beast. ;)

Best,
Sabrina

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sabrina,
We will definitely look into this! Thank you.

Melissa

says:

I have been using AAR Level 2 with my dyslexic son for several weeks now. I am impressed by how this curriculum methodically covers all aspects of reading and includes review of all materials.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Melissa,
Thank you for sharing how AAR is working for your son. Sounds like things are going well.

m.l.

says:

We use both AAR and AAS. We love both. I have been so impressed with this curriculum that I recommend it to anyone who will listen.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

m.l.,
Thank you for your recommendations!

Marisa

says:

What a great testimony!

Kelly

says:

What a great story! Love to see how it was the father doing the instructing :)

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kelly,
Dads doing the teaching is a minority, but not rare. I know a few dads that do all or at least a significant portion of teaching their children.

Erica

says:

All About Spelling is Awesome!

Lori Reilly

says:

<3 the all about spelling

christine

says:

I’m excited to find tools to help my son who struggles with dyslexia. One of the joys of homeschooling is being able learn and grow with your children. Thanks be to God! :)

Lisa

says:

Good Job, Kobe! Kudos to parents, Matthew and Tiffany, for encouraging and supporting his eagerness to learn, and providing him with an excellent toolkit!

Aude'marie

says:

This is truly inspiring as I will be I will be starting my journey with my 6 year next year.

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