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Teaching Latin Roots with Word Trees

Many English words come from Latin roots, so becoming familiar with these roots will naturally make reading and spelling easier. But studying word roots is really boring, right?

No! At least, it doesn’t have to be. And Word Trees are my favorite way to teach words derived from Latin roots—and make it engaging to boot!

Check out this 30-second Word Tree demo.

Download your free Word Trees and list of Latin Roots, and then read on for some tips for using them.

Why Is It Helpful to Know Latin Roots?

Think about the Latin root scrib/script, which means to write. When you add prefixes and suffixes to the root, you can create many new words that all have something to do with writing, such as subscriber, scripture, inscribed, description, postscript, prescription, scribbling, and unscripted.

It’s like an 8-for-1 deal: you learn one Latin root, and you get eight words in return. And when you come across a less familiar word like scriptorium, you can recognize the root script, which in turn gives you a head start on understanding the word’s meaning and spelling.

(In case you are wondering, a scriptorium is a room set aside for writing. That makes sense, given that script means to write and -orium is a suffix meaning a place for.)

So it’s probably easy for you to see why I’m such a huge fan of learning Latin roots!

Is Your Child Ready for Word Trees?

If you can answer yes to these three questions, your child is at the right stage to benefit from Word Tree activities:

  1. Does your child know how to spell closed syllables? Closed syllables are syllables that end in a consonant, such as sub, tract, con, and rupt. A closed syllable generally contains a short vowel, and it is the first syllable type that most children learn to spell.
  2. Does your child know how to spell open syllables? Open syllables are syllables that end in a vowel, such as me, be, and di. The vowel in an open syllable is generally long.
  3. Does your child know how to spell common prefixes and suffixes such as -tion, -tive, ab-, and -able?

While Word Trees can be interesting for younger children, they are most effective with children who have already mastered these three spelling skills.

Here’s How to Use the Word Trees

Teaching Latin Roots with Word Trees - from All About Learning Press

The free download contains five prepared Word Trees, plus one blank one.

  1. Decide which root word you want to work with. If you are using a blank Word Tree, write the root word in the box at the base of the tree.
  2. Think of as many words originating from that root as possible, and write those words on the branches.
  3. Store completed Word Trees in a binder or folder for future reference.

If you can only think of a few words at first, keep the Word Tree available and add to it over the next few days. Perhaps family members, a neighbor, or a friend can think of words to add, or maybe your child will run across more words in his private reading time.

Teaching Latin Roots with Word Trees - All About Learning Press

In the photo above, Jimmy created twelve words with the root port, including export, supportive, and reporter. How many words can you come up with?

Which Root Words Should You Teach?

There are hundreds of possible root words to choose from, but two guidelines will make it easy for you to choose effective root words for beginners.

  1. First, work with root words that occur frequently, as shown in the chart below.
  2. Second, work with root words whose meaning is easier for your child to understand and that relate to words he already knows. For example, auto (self) and spect (to look) should be studied before fer (to carry).
Teaching Latin Roots with Word Trees - from All About Learning Press

How Do We Teach Latin Roots in All About Spelling?

All About Reading Activity Download

Experience a sample Latin roots lesson from All About Spelling Level 7.
Download this Lesson plan for Level 7, Lesson 17.

In the lesson, we start out using letter tiles to demonstrate how prefixes and suffixes can be added to Latin roots.

Then we move on to building four Word Trees. Ten words are assigned for further study, including supportive, distraction, contractor, and inspector.

Next, students write several sentences from dictation, including “Those gnus in the living room are a real distraction!” Finally, students randomly choose four slips of paper from the Writing Station to generate an interesting writing prompt, and they write several unique sentences using at least one of the new Latin-derived spelling words.

Some Final Tips for Teaching Latin Roots

It’s important to keep in mind that we can’t take the meanings of Latin root words too literally. In many cases, the meaning of the root is just a clue to the meaning of the word. For example, the word introspection comes from the prefix intro (meaning inward) and the root spect (meaning to look). We can’t literally translate the word to inward look, but we can get the gist of the real meaning, which is an examination of thoughts and feelings.

Also, for this particular activity, your student doesn’t need to memorize the meaning of the root words or recite them back. As long as he becomes familiar with the meanings, he will be able to recognize the root in other words, and spelling will become easier.

My hope is that as your child actively explores words in this unusual way, he will develop a positive attitude and curiosity about the words around him … and hopefully increase his motivation to learn more!

Would you like step-by-step lessons that help you teach spelling in a hands-on way? All About Spelling was written for parents and teachers like you!

All About Spelling - take the struggle out of spelling

Do you think your child would like the Word Trees approach?

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Leave a Reply to Robin E. Cancel Reply

Lydia R.

says:

Thank you for this! My fourth grader recently transferred to a school with an accelerated curriculum. I’ll use this word tree with him to tackle those Greek and Latin root vocabulary words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lydia,
Yes, these can be very helpful with vocabulary learning as well as spelling.

Judy Dickson

says:

I am going to use the Word Tree approach with the 5th grade girl that I am tutoring. She will enjoy a new approach to spelling new words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Judy,
The Word Trees are a great way to practice building words with roots, prefixes, and suffixes. It also helps a lot with vocabulary as well, as students often see for the first time how words like abduction and introducing are related. On the surface they seem unrelated, but once you understand the root duct things start to make connections!

Kassie

says:

I pulled this (and other free spelling and reading lesson samples) from the site for my son. Seeing the prefix, root, suffix of words has really helped him make connections in decoding the word’s meaning and spelling. Highly recommended.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kassie,
We’re pleased you found many of our spelling and reading lesson samples helpful. Please let us know if you have any questions or need anything.

Yes, yes, yes!! I am a homeschool supervising teacher. I study Latin roots myself and it is so fun to see all the connections. I love this idea of a Word Tree!
Is there a book(s) to teach this concept to elementary students? Is Level 7 of All About Spelling the only one?
I have students interested in the medical field and I think a more extensive study of roots would be helpful to them.

Thanks for your consideration and all of you work!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jodie,
AAS 7 teaches 12 Latin roots contained in more than 300 words, as well as Latin plural words. It also teaches 18 Greek roots, and common words on loan from French, Spanish, and Italian.

However, the blank word tree form in this blog post’s download can be used for any word root. Here are some possible resources for continuing Latin studies, or starting them before AAS 7:

The Book of Roots and Roots of English (Memoria Press)
English from the Roots Up (Literacy Unlimited)
Greek and Latin Roots, and More Greek and Latin Roots (Creative Teaching Press)
Vocabulary from Classical Roots (Educators Publishing Service)
Vocabulary Packets: Greek and Latin Roots (Scholastic)
Vocabulary Vine, and Science Roots (Hasseler)
Word Roots (The Critical Thinking Company)

One customer emailed about a resource book, Horace’s Quick List of Latin and Greek Prefixes and Combining Forms, by Horace G. Danner. This author also wrote Discover It! The Ultimate Vocabulary Builder, which has lessons. These might be worth checking out as well.

For elementary students, I personally love Rummy Roots and More Roots. These are card games that teach word roots in a fun, easy to learn way.

Ann

says:

We’re half way through level 3 and I was wanting to add an easy study of root words to our homeschool. I’m glad that level 7 introduces it. How many words are covered in level 7? Is it covered to an extent that I won’t need to supplement?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Ann,
All About Spelling works with 12 Latin roots and 18 Greek roots. These are the most common that students will encounter, such as port, scib, dict, photo, graph, therm, auto, and others. You can see the full list of Latin and Greek roots listed in Steps 17-19 and 21-23 on the AAS 7 Scope and Sequence. AAS 7 also covers words with French, Italian, and Spanish origin.

As to whether you will need to supplement, that depends upon your goal in teaching roots. If you want to teach roots to help your child with spelling, I do not think you will need to supplement. If your goal is to study roots to have a fuller understanding of English vocabulary that comes to us from Latin and Greek, then you may choose to supplement. However, I found the roots covered in AAS 7 to be by far the ones my kids are most likely to need for general purposes.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have further questions.

Ann

says:

Great – thank you. That’s helpful. I’m always wondering why the summary on curriculum sites doesn’t answer some of (what I think are) the basic questions. Maybe the site designers/advertisers think nobody will read the full description? Anyway – thank you for giving me those details.

Steph

says:

Fabulous resource! This is a really great teaching tool!

Amanda

says:

So thankful for all about learning! Not only great curriculum but excellent help provided also. I am so appreciative of the time you all spend helping all of us parents help our children!

Ramona Hamilton

says:

This free lesson plan was very helpful for my 8th grader who struggles in spelling. Thank you!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Ramona! Thank you for letting us know it was helpful for your student.

Jen H.

says:

I have just started Prima Latina with the kids this year, and I think these Latin Root Word Trees will be a great supplement to the curriculum.

Colleen Cruff

says:

I love this! Latin roots are key to exponentially building vocabulary!

Helaine

says:

As a Spanish and English speaker, this root word approach makes sense!
We’ve used this principle in helping our children spell correctly in relation to words similar in both aforementioned languages and it has helped a great deal! I look forward to applying the Latin root word idea with greater intentionality. Thank you for the insights!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Helaine,
Thank you for letting using know that this word root tree approach makes sense from a bilingual point of view.

Renae B

says:

I look forward to using this in AAS when my son is old enough. It is good to know Latin roots are covered some in the program.

This tool is a lot simpler and easier for students to use and reference. I really enjoy the lay out, very student friendly. Thanks for sharing.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Julia. I hope these help your students learn and enjoy Latin roots.

Lisa

says:

Love this!! Thank you !

Jen Spencer

says:

Thanks for the downloads! We forgot to copy our blank tree before we wrote on it. I want to use it for other roots as well, and now we are all set!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Jen.

Rekha

says:

I am aware that teaching, etymology of words brings added value and a logical understanding of words, but reading this blog reiterated this . Your offering of the same, is just the perfect approach I was working at, but BINGO seems like, that I got, exactly what I was seeking .

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rekha,
I’m happy to hear this is was just what you were looking for!

Cassie McCurry

says:

I love this! Learning root words was what helped me become a strong speller. Would love to use this with my daughter!

Lauren

says:

Thank you for this! I’ve been casually introducing Latin roots, but it doesn’t seem like it’s “sticking” – I think the kids will enjoy making their own trees, and I can see how it will help them make spelling connections, too!

Keri Archer

says:

Thank you for all your helpful and encouraging tips on teaching spelling. My family enjoys using AAS.

I like this! Great idea.

Maria

says:

I love this activity

Abbey W

says:

We’re currently working on Level 2, but I’m already looking forward to Level 7. I know my analytical boys will really enjoy these lessons, particularly since we’re also learning Latin. They really enjoy making connections between one subject and another.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Abbey,
Making connections between subjects strengthens the learning in both subjects! It’s a great way to learn.

Kay

says:

This is such a great way to reinforce root words!

Melanie

says:

Love these, great way to master roots.

Shannon

says:

This is such a good idea! Visuals always help to aid in understanding something that is abstract.

April Kohl

says:

I love this. Thank you for making this available!

Sharon

says:

This is such a wonderful idea! Ushers you into a world of vocabulary and I know my children and I will have a lot of fun using this. Thank you for all the effort you put into these lessons. Bless you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Sharon. I hope you and your children enjoy these!

Jen Spencer

says:

We are in this section in level 7! I appreciate the connection to vocabulary and the practice building them for spelling.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jen,
Thank you for letting us know that you appreciate the work in All About Spelling 7 with both vocabulary building and spelling of these Latin roots!

Laura

says:

This is a new concept for me to learn Latin root words!

Kelly

says:

This will go perfectly with the Latin we are learning in our Classical Conversations curriculum. Thank you.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kelly,
We’ve heard from a few people studying Latin in Classical Conversations and they have all said that these word trees are helpful.

Jenni

says:

I have been looking for something like this to teach my kids and I love that I found it here! Thank you for the resource.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jenni,
You are welcome, Jenni. I hope you all have fun with Latin roots.

Brittany Mellon

says:

I love knowing origins of words.

Brandi W

says:

I love this activity for building vocabulary! Thanks for the free download!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Brandi,
You are welcome. Enjoy!

Violene

says:

Great graphic organizer. this is such a fun way to teach root words.

Maureen

says:

This a such a great idea and visual for kids learning roots.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Maureen,
It is visual and tactile, as children write or move the word parts around to for the words. These Word Trees allow students to play with words, and that helps with learning.

Suzanne

says:

Thank you for sharing this. I didn’t do Latin with my older, and always beat myself up about it. I want to do it with my younger.

YN

says:

This method is a great idea for those studying English as a foreign language! Thank you for showing us such an easy-to-understand & efficient way.

Lily

says:

My son is nowhere near this point, he’s still in preschool, but I totally love this method of teaching! Root words are so usefull!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lily,
Yeah, preschool is pretty young, but discussing the meaning of words and word parts can begin even now. I remember discussing what “un” meant in words like undo and unhelpful when my youngest was a preschooler.

Gina

says:

This is what I want to use with my 2 children. Thank you for offering it free!

Julie Patterson

says:

Thank you for the printables!

Judy Dickson

says:

I think the 4th grade girl I am tutoring would enjoy the word trees.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Judy,
The Word Trees do seem to be really enjoyable for many students!

Julie

says:

We had been using AAS for my oldest, but switched to something else this year. After seeing this, I’m definitely considering going back to AAS, as I don’t think our current curriculum addresses roots at all.

Sarah Waltman

says:

Thanks so much! I just downloaded the word trees and am excited to begin using these in our homeschool!

Lauren

says:

This is really helpful! I especially like the tips on if your child is ready.

Rita Nunley

says:

Love the word trees. My school uses an OG based word study program. I personally use AAR and AAS to supplement. Great stuff!

I love this idea. I will use this with my 5th and 6th graders.

Teresa

says:

I love the Word Trees approach! Vocabulary is so important to reading, and these trees are a fun and wonderful way to teach the meaning of words.

Julia B

says:

I love this idea! I look forward to using it once we arrive at that place with my little boy :-)

Christina Burns

says:

Great idea!

Debbie B

says:

This is great! Looking forward to using them. I might even learn a thing or two. 😉 Thank you for all the fabulous resources you offer and at no additional charge!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Debbie. Enjoy! (And I have learned so much from using AAR and AAS with my children!)

Rachel neufeld

says:

Going to bookmark this. We are not at this level yet but when we are this looks great.

Judith Martinez

says:

I think the tree visual would appeal to some of my learners. I have notebooking pages for latin roots but they might like this method better.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Judith,
It is good to have various ways of presenting material. I hope your students find these Word Trees helpful.

Erica C

says:

Will definitely try this! Thank you!

Nicki

says:

Genius tool. We love this method.

Ellen Schlosser

says:

I’m looking forward to trying this! Thanks!

Joy Perina

says:

This is soooo smart! I am learning new things too!

Brenda

says:

We are a few levels away from this, but already it’s popping up here and there. Excited to dig into some of these concepts further down the road. Thanks for making amazing lessons that are fun to teach and easy to learn.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Brenda,
You can do some Latin Word Trees before AAS 7, if you think it would benefit your student. You can make them non-spelling by cutting up the boxes where the words are and just rearranging the word parts for making the words.

Ashley Biron

says:

I think that this is awesome! Working in the medical profession, I value instruction on roots, prefixes, and suffixes.

Melissa

says:

Love this!

Lisa

says:

Thank you! This is wonderful.

Tara M.

says:

Such a good way to make it connect- excited to do this next year.

This is great! Will be doing this next year with my kiddos! We have used AAR 1 & 2, and AAS 1 and love it!!

Sabrina Miller

says:

Such a great idea and a lovely hands on way to teach Latin roots!

Lisa Emerson

says:

THis looks wonderful! Looking forward to doing this with my 2nd grader:)

Diana Moxcey

says:

I love all your products! Thanks!

Alyssa Pliml

says:

I use this method to teach medical terminology. I never thought to try it with my kids! Thank you for the free download!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Alyssa. I can see this method being very helpful for medicine, but it is equally helpful for everyone as our language has gotten so much from Latin.

Sonja Z

says:

This a great resource! I never thought of learning Latin roots to help with spelling.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sonja,
If you think of these kinds of words as like Lego bricks put together to build longer words, it is easier to spell them. You just have to remember/sound out how to spell each part, instead of trying to spell the word as a whole.

Kristin Savarese

says:

This is great! Thank you!

LAURA Beach

says:

I am excited to try the word tree with both of my boys!

Baiyina Brown

says:

This is great!

Linsey

says:

Something similar to this is how I studied for college Latin tests

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Linsey,
The question is, was this a successful method for studying for you? We’d love to know.

Yvette

says:

This is amazing. I can’t wait to try it with my son.

Gina

says:

I really like this idea

Angela Bennett

says:

I love the idea of a word tree. I think it will help my daughter understand latin roots.

Nance

says:

Thanks for the download! I am excited to try this with my older daughter!

Melissa

says:

thank you for the download

Kellym

says:

Thank you for the downloads!

Misty

says:

Thank you for the very useful information.

Tina J.

says:

Fantastic resource. Will have to give a try.

N. Lynn Schofield

says:

This is very useful. We are studying Latin so it will be fun to use these for the kids’ derivatives work.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yes! These would be a great resource for Latin study.

Andria

says:

I would hope that my child would love the word tree approach ! I know I would!! I may get it just for me:) we are on level 3 of AAS so my question is when would be a good time to start the word tree approach ?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Andria,
All About Spelling schedules these Word Trees and many others (12 in total) in AAS 7.

You can play with these Word Trees before then, especially from a reading point of view. If your child is reading chapter books, then now would be a fine time to play with the Word Trees for reading. You could cut the prefixes and suffixes apart so that your child could move them around to form words to read.

However, some of the spelling of these words isn’t covered until higher levels of All About Spelling. For example, when to use able and when to use ible (such as reasonable and edible) is covered in AAS 6. When to use tion and when to use sion (as in information and procession) is covered in AAS 5. Because of this, it may be best to not use the Word Trees from a spelling point of view until AAS 7.

Olivia

says:

Kids can really enjoy this! In one AAR lesson (level 4, I think), the activity sheet consists of several prefix cards, root word cards, and suffix cards. I gave them to my son and demonstrated how to combine two or more of the cards to make a real word. He enjoyed the challenge of trying to make as many words as possible.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Olivia,
Great reminder. These activities are in Lesson 22, 32, and 36 of All About Reading 4.

Tina

says:

Looking forward to trying this with my kids!

jean b

says:

Love this post! Such a helpful guide. I didn’t learn roots until senior year of high school and I’ve always thought I would teach my daughter’s much sooner. They are so useful!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jean,
Senior year of high school seems very late to learn word roots. I agree; teach them much sooner.

Janice Hamelburg

says:

The Word Trees look like a great way to teach children root words. Thank you!

Esther

says:

Thank you for this great resource.

Jill

says:

I always appreciate your help in teaching my student things that I may not think of or even know where to begin teaching. Thanks.

McCaughey

says:

I am teaching Latin to my 1st grader and it’s amazing how he can recognize Latin roots in English words now. It has also really helped with his grammar…Recommend Latin to all homeschooling mom’s .

Jessica medina

says:

OOO..I saved this. My kids are struggling with this topic!

Ellen

says:

This is such a helpful resource! Thank you!

Stacey Foot

says:

Awesome! This will really help with our Classical Conversations Latin work!

Casey

says:

That was my exact same thought! Definitely adding it to our Latin time.

Pamela Johnson

says:

This is a very interesting approach and will help students as they take standardized tests .

Sarah Phillips

says:

Thank you for the free word trees! I’m a visual learner, and so is my oldest. I’m hoping this will help when I start teaching him (and myself as well) Latin.

Carrie

says:

This looks fabulous! I’m planning to do Latin, as well as German, with my boys, and this looks like it will be a great fit for us!

Mel

says:

This will be so helpful. Thanks!

Christine Hancock

says:

I’ve been looking for something like this!

cindy Krenicky

says:

i’m loving teaching my kids AAS and AAR!

Julie

says:

My son has learned so much through your curriculum. These trees are another brilliant idea towards helping to take the guessing out of spelling. Thank you.

Susan

says:

We’re beginning to learn Latin and the roots visual is helpful. I hope my kids will enjoy learning as much as I am!

Seems like a great program!

Molly Waters

says:

I love the image of trees for making connections! My kids were just learning about family trees….I know Word Trees will make an impact.

Yamel

says:

I wish I had something like this growing up. This definitely helps you build a broader vocabulary. Thank You for sharing.

Rhonda Kennedy

says:

Yes! We used English from the Roots Up a bit and my children get to put a marble in a jar anytime they come across a word using one of the Greek or Latin words we’ve learned. They have to know the definition of the root and what that has to do with the word derived from that root. When the jar is full we do something special and start over again. This would be a fun visual to go along with that!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rhonda,
I think your marble jar idea is wonderful! I think I might steal it. :D

Love all your resources! They work!

Jennifer Stone

says:

This looks amazing for my 5th and 7th graders. If I win the giveaway I will definitely order level 7 for them. My 3rd grader is struggling and I am trying to decide between levels 1 and 2 for him. Thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jennifer,
We recommend that most students start with level 1 to build a strong foundation in spelling.

All About Spelling is a building block program with each level building upon the previous one. The rules and concepts learned in Level 1 are applied in Level 2, and then those are applied in Level 3, and so on. Placement for spelling is based on the student’s knowledge of spelling rules and concepts rather than grade level, reading level, or the words a student has memorized.

For example, we find that many students simply memorize easy words like “cat” and “kid” but have no idea why one uses a C and the other uses a K, or that the same rules that apply to these words also apply to higher level words such as “concentrate.” Other students switch letters or leave out letters entirely. This usually occurs because they don’t know how to hear each sound in the word. Level 1 has specific techniques to solve these problems.

The article Which Spelling Level Should We Start With? has more information on the concepts taught in All About Spelling 1 and will help you decide if your student can skip level 1 and go into level 2.

Level 2 of AAS focuses on learning the syllable types, when they are used and how they affect spelling. This information is foundational for higher levels of spelling. Three syllable rules are introduced in Level 2, and then more in Level 3 and up. For this reason, we generally don’t recommend starting higher than level 2.

We encourage parents and teachers to “fast track” if the student knows how to spell most of the words but does not understand the underlying basic spelling concepts. In this case, very quickly skim the parts that he already knows and slow down on the parts that he needs to learn. Pull out several words as examples. Make sure he understands the concept being taught, and then move on. This blog article has a good example of how you might fast track.

As for your 5th and 7th graders, students who don’t struggle with spelling can potentially use AAS 7 without having used the previous levels. They would not learn all of the spelling rules and concepts that are taught in earlier levels (such as when to use C versus when to use K for the /k/ sound in a word), but if they can spell well on a junior high level they would have a sufficient base of knowledge to use and benefit from Level 7. Here are two main determiners of whether Level 7 would work for a student:

1. Can the student hear the individual sounds in words? In the first half of the book, we wrap up the study of letter-sound correspondences, and in order to benefit from those lessons, the student needs to be able to hear the sounds in words. Many times, we say things like “Listen for the sound of /e/ in this word: deplete.”

2. Can the student accurately add suffixes to base words? For example, does the student know that “funny + est = funniest”, changing the Y to an I? And that “swim + er = swimmer”, that we double the m before adding a vowel suffix? Level 7 assumes that the student already has mastered how to add suffixes.

In the second part of Level 7, the focus changes from learning letter-sound correspondences to learning morphemic (“word meaning”) strategies. the student concentrates on Latin and Greek word parts, as well as loan words from Spanish, French, and Italian. In the final lesson, the student sets up a plan for lifetime learning.

Take a look at the online samples and scope & sequence charts for Level 7, and see what you think.

I hope this info helps! If you have additional questions about placement, please let me know.

Rose Ruhl

says:

Do you have a writing program??
Thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rose,
No, we do not have a writing program. Our products are All About Reading and All About Spelling.

Michele Blakely

says:

I like the visual approach to teaching roots. I’ll use it when my kids get to that stage!

PL

says:

Very visual, easy to relate to. Great way to teach roots!!

Christine Mayfield

says:

I think our kids would. They study and memorize Latin through Classical Conversations.

Holly

says:

I believe I will have to try this

Rebecca

says:

This looks really interesting. I may have to give it a try.

Tina Lutz

says:

This is genius! Thank you!!

Laura

says:

My kids love how easy it is to learn spelling with All About Spelling. I love how easy it is for me to use!

Alea

says:

love this way to learn spelling so cool!!

Joy

says:

We love how thorough All About
Reading is! There is lots of practice
and my kids love the activities! We will be using all the levels!

Allaa Kamil

says:

Wow!!! Such a useful method. It will be very useful to Supplement latin roots lessons. Thank you!!

This is fascinating! We aren’t to this point in our spelling yet, but I’ll have to remember this!

andrea

says:

Love this! What a fun and easy way to learn Latin roots. Thank you!

LEZLIE

says:

I am excited to try this! Latin roots are so important and helpful. What a great way to teach them!

Katie

says:

I have benefited from learning latin and greek roots as a child and I want my kids to learn them too.

Beth

says:

This is a great program!

Susan

says:

Latin is great for increasing your vocabulary. In some ways more practical than learning other foreign languages you may never use.

Sharon

says:

I love this! I like how the matrix at the bottom of the tree will let them build words related to the base. I do have a question about -tion as a suffix. What do you teach is the suffix for the word “action” since the base word is act and therefore the suffix has to be -ion? Is this addressed in this curriculum? Just curious as I often see this taught incorrectly.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sharon,
All About Spelling addresses the /shun/ syllable separately from suffixes, as tion, ation, sion, ssion, and cion don’t always follow the suffix rules. In AAS 5, we teach that tion is the most common way to spell the syllable /shun/ and sion is the second most common way. We then teach three clues that help students know which to use. If the base word ends in the sound of /t/, then use tion (objection). If the word ends in /ā-shun/, then use ation (information). Lastly, if the word ends in the sound of /s/, then use sion (discussion). During the teaching of the third clue, the student finds that if the base word ends in ss, such as recess, then the first s is kept as the sion is added. This is easy for students as they can clearly hear the /s/ sound at the end of the syllable before the /shun/ (re-ces-sion). AAS 5 also teaches that some words do not have base words and we simply must practice them to know whether to use tion or sion (motion and vision).

Then, in All About Spelling 7, we teach the exceptions that have a base word that ends in /t/ but has /shun/ spelled ssion, for example admit – admission.

I hope this answer your questions, but please let me know if you have further questions.

Jennifer Kispert

says:

We love All About Spelling!

Christi Brogan

says:

I love this idea! Can’t wait to apply it!

ALT

says:

This is great.

Christen

says:

What a helpful tool that actually looks fun. My son is learning Latin roots this year but is bored by it, so I want to try this!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Christen,
If these Word Trees go over well with your son, he might enjoy the card game Rummy Roots as well. There is no need for learning Latin roots to be boring.

Cecelia

says:

Thankful that this curriculum has such easy and precise directions so I don’t get overwhelmed with how to teach this subject!

Liz

says:

I love this idea!! I have 2 kids learning Latin right now and see how understanding Latin helps with English word understandings. Both also have dyslexia and so this visual of the tree and the roots will be so helpful. My 10 year old will be helped by it too!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Liz,
Let us know if the Word Trees are as helpful to your students as you think they will be.

Mellisa Huibregtse

says:

I can’t wait to get stated on this for myself as a parent! Even looks fun!

Jo Ann

says:

This is a great article. Thanks for the ideas! I’m wondering if all the Word Trees are included in the All About Spelling curriculum, or if it only has a few?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jo Ann,
All About Spelling level 7 includes 12 Word Tree sheets for 12 different Latin roots, plus a blank Word Tree sheet for doing more if the student desires. Word Trees are used in AAS 7 to teach the most common Latin roots from an English spelling perspective. It doesn’t attempt to cover every possible Latin root.

Does this answer your question? Please let us know if you have further questions.

Kelly

says:

Thank you for this, it compliments our Classical Conversations curriculum.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Kelly. I hadn’t thought of Classical Conversations, but now that you mention it these do seem like they would be a nice supplement for that.

April T

says:

Very helpful, thanks!

Danielle Barton

says:

My daughter isn’t quite ready for this! But hopefully soon!!!

Yuna

says:

For some reason, reading this post gave me flashbacks of my high school SAT Prep courses LOL

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yuna,
Oh, no! My SAT prep courses were boring and tedious, and that is not what we aimed for here. Hopefully it’s only the subject matter that caused the flashback, and not the methods.

Erica Bancroft

says:

Yes, thank you!
We are learning about Latin with Classical Conversations and this resource is a welcome addition. Thanks so much!

Shalyn McPherson

says:

I teach latin to my 5th grader, this would be great for my 1st grader!

Lisa Waldron

says:

Love this curriculum!

Susanne

says:

Thanks! I’m looking forward to trying this.

Samantha

says:

Yet another way to tie our Latin and English together! Always such great stuff here- thank you!

Amanda

says:

Love this idea! Thank you!

Jess

says:

Love this idea!

Jennifer O

says:

Love this idea! Your blog is full of such wonderful resources! Thanks!

Cassandra

says:

This is an awesome idea! So great for visual learners :)

Kristen

says:

Great download. We are learning Latin concurrently and our program also goes over Latin derivatives in English. This will help also.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kristen,
These Word Trees sound like they would be a great review option for what you are already doing!

Christina

says:

Thank you for the free download!

Beka

says:

Learning word roots in elementary helped me tremendously in high school and college. Now I am teaching my kids-who actually like it. Thanks for the free download!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Beka. Since your children like it so much, look into the card game Rummy Roots. It makes a game of learning Latin word roots.

Nikki

says:

I wish I learned this when I was younger. It would have made learning medical terminology much easier!

Rebecca

says:

I am so thankful for AAR. They always have the tools we need at the right time.

Lisa Ingle

says:

Thanks for the download! Can’t wait to try this with my kids.

Andrea

says:

This looks great! Especially for visual learners. I can’t wait to try it with my children.

Micha

says:

I love the Latin root. Thank you. Thank you for the opportunity in giveaway. Wonderful products.

Carrie Baikey

says:

Very neat idea to help make a boring task fun! Love it!

Jennifer H.

says:

Thank you for this wonderful new tool! I remember when Latin was always offered as a foreign language in high school and it was recommended for premed students.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jennifer,
There is definitely a lot of Latin in medical terminology. Knowing Latin, or at least a lot of Latin root, would be helpful in med school.

Christy

says:

I had been wondering if you ever covered Latin and now I know. I like the tree idea – would have been great to use when I was teaching roots in school. I will definitely be using it with my two when they are a bit older.

nicole henke

says:

thanks for the great advice on using work groups and whether to start letting her or not

Cathy

says:

Love this idea for teaching Latin roots! Can’t wait to share it with my daughter who is struggling with high school Latin. Thank you!

Jackie M

says:

This looks great! Thanks for sharing!

Ashley

says:

Thanks for the printable. Sometimes the kids just like to see something different.

Christina Ferrell

says:

That looks really interesting. We will have to try that.

Teresa

says:

Very interesting idea!

Jessica

says:

Love it! Thank you!

Meredith

says:

This is fantastic. I’m going to try this activity with my 6th grader. I think it would be perfect for him. Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Let us know how it goes, Meredith.

Cherryl Rushing

says:

This looks so great!

Mandy

says:

Looking forward to using this as we finish level 7!

Elizabeth

says:

I had no idea that you covered Latin in any of your levels!!!! Big plus!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Elizabeth,
Just to be clear, we don’t cover Latin as a language. We just teach Latin roots, word parts that have come down to us from Latin. We cover Greek roots as well, by the way.

Christine

says:

So thankful for these materials. My children are reading and their love of learning is growing!

Amanda Strickland

says:

Oh my goodness, your program sounds amazing, my daughter goes to a public school but she is really struggling with reading, spelling and math! I can’t wait to show this program to my husband, this is just the thing we were looking for to help her at home. Is there anything particularly that you recommend.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amanda,
We recommend that struggling spellers start with All About Spelling 1 to build a strong foundation in spelling.

All About Spelling is a building block program with each level building upon the previous one. The rules and concepts learned in Level 1 are applied in Level 2, and then those are applied in Level 3, and so on. Placement for spelling is based on the student’s knowledge of spelling rules and concepts rather than grade level, reading level, or the words a student has memorized.

For example, we find that many students simply memorize easy words like “cat” and “kid” but have no idea why one uses a C and the other uses a K, or that the same rules that apply to these words also apply to higher level words such as “concentrate.” Other students switch letters or leave out letters entirely. This usually occurs because they don’t know how to hear each sound in the word. Level 1 has specific techniques to solve these problems.

We encourage parents and teachers to “fast track” if the student knows how to spell most of the words but does not understand the underlying basic spelling concepts. In this case, very quickly skim the parts that she already knows and slow down on the parts that she needs to learn. Pull out several words as examples. Make sure she understands the concept being taught, and then move on. This blog article has a good example of how you might fast track.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have any questions or if you need anything.

Melissa

says:

At what age would
You recommend starting to learn word roots.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great question, Melissa!

All About Spelling includes work with Latin and Greek roots as a part of level 7, the final level. Most students are at least 10 before getting to AAS 7, and many are older.

However, I think younger children could be introduced to the concept of word roots. A child would need to be reading and spelling fairly well, but learning some roots could help. Games that teach word roots, such as the card game Rummy Roots or one of many app game options, may be the best way to approach learning roots with younger children.

Tamara Diggs

says:

I think this is what we need for next year!

shaimaa

says:

I love your way in teaching ….so easy and interesting.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Shaimaa!

Kathy Penn at Sound Literacy has some amazing screenshots of Latin/Greek roots using her app. I’ve printed out several screenshots to use with students. Here’s one example. I love how her tiles can be customized to work with AAR & AAS. http://soundliteracy.com/hydraulic/

oops…I see already commented on that. I wish her app worked on android also.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

It’s okay, Nancy! You always have something useful to add.

This is great. Kathy Penn, of Sound Literacy, really does a lot with Latin roots using her app, which can be customized to AAS tile colors. https://www.facebook.com/Sound-Literacy-191819280832394/

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Nancy,
Thank you for sharing this. Sound Literacy looks like a great app, and I would love to try it.

Sadly, however, Sound Literacy is an iPad only application and I don’t have an iPad. I have asked them to consider a Windows app, or a way to use it through a web browser, because touchscreen computers are becoming more affordable and common (I just got one, in fact).

Deanna

says:

This is a fantastic resource. Studying Latin roots certainly helped my son throughout high school and into college. Thank you!

Becki

says:

This is such a neat activity. It will be a while before we are able to use this as we are in level 2, but this is definitely saved for future reference.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Becki,
These word trees, and many others, are used in Level 7. It’s a fabulous way to teach Latin roots.

LoriB

says:

Are there any enrichment or “digging deeper” activities for students who have an easy time with the basic spelling in the earlier levels like level 3?

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lori,
When students find the level they are easy we suggest moving through it faster so that they can get to the higher level. Any enrichment work would be busy work compared to just moving forward into the higher levels.

While your child might not be an older student, you can still use the tips in this article for Using All About Spelling with Older Students to move faster. We have had reports of children as young as 5 or 6 finishing all the way through Level 7, although that is very rare and the children are remarkably advanced. Finishing all 7 Levels seems to be more common between ages 11 to 13.

Lisa Starr

says:

I’ve been homeschooling for 17 years and the Latin root way of teaching spelling never made any sense to me until now. I’d always looked at spelling like you would when you teach reading, in a phonogram way. I have a game called Vocabulary Vine that I believe uses Latin roots and I cannot remember where I got it but maybe I could add it to AAS to teach my 8th grade son to spell. It’s been a struggle because he also struggled to read but I knew that AAS would work and Merry helped me to see that I could use it with older kids like she did hers. Thanks for these tips!!

Merry at AALP

says:

I’m so glad this was helpful, Lisa!

Great idea to add in Vocabulary Vine, let us know how you like it.

AAS teaches 4 main spelling strategies: phonetic, rules-based, visual, and morphemic. You might find this article helpful as well: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/effective-spelling-strategies/

Nicholette

says:

Is it a spelling program I can buy , download, and print?

Nicholette,
These “word trees” are a part of the highest level of All About Spelling (AAS). http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/all-about-spelling/

All About Spelling program is ideal for students with dyslexia because it is Orton-Gillingham based. Marie, the author, is a member of the International Dyslexia Association, and was an instructor for the graduate level courses in Orton-Gillingham Literacy Training offered through Nicolet College in Rhinelander, Wisconsin for 3 years. If you haven’t had a chance to watch their story about her son’s struggles, you may want to check that out. Quite amazing! http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/about

As you likely know, spelling is difficult for dyslexic students who must be directly taught certain skills and basic spelling rules, such as how to hear each sound in a word or when to use j, ge, or dge for the sound of /j/. Here are some ways that AAS can help kids with dyslexia and other learning disabilities:

– Our spelling program is explicit and tells students exactly what they need to know in order to spell. We don’t make them guess. The lessons are laid out in an orderly form for the teacher too, so that each day you can simply open and go. The program is easy to do at home without prior training.

– AAS is incremental and mastery based. Our sequence was very carefully tested to reduce confusion for the child. A student will master one concept at a time before adding in others.

– AAS is multisensory. It approaches learning through sight, sound, and touch. This helps kids who struggle with memory issues, because they take in information in various ways and also interact with it in various ways. The kinesthetic approach can be very helpful to a child who has expressive language struggles.

– It uses specially color-coded letter tiles. Working with the letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept. http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/using-letter-tiles/

– AAS is scripted, so you can concentrate on your child. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage. Marie also spent a lot of time researching how to word the rules. Our rules are worded so they are as easy for children to remember as possible.

– It has built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning disabilities generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. After a concept has been taught, don’t assume that the child knows it. We quickly revisit that concept again in the next lesson. With AAS, your child will have a Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows.

– AAS is logical and incremental. It provides the structure, organization and clear guidance that kids who struggle need in order to learn.

If you’d like to see some samples:
Here are samples and scope and sequence links for All About Spelling Levels 1-7. http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/spelling-lesson-samples

We receive many letters from teachers and parents who find other programs difficult to use with their dyslexic students, and then they switch to All About Spelling and it’s like a light is turned on for their children. We also provide lifetime support to help every step of the way.

For placement, since she is struggling with very basic words, I recommend starting with Level 1. We find that many students simply memorize easy words like “cat” and “kid” but have no idea why one uses a C and the other uses a K, or that the same rules that apply to these words also apply to higher level words such as “concentrate.” Other students switch letters or leave out letters entirely. This usually occurs because they don’t know how to hear each sound in the word. Level 1 has specific techniques to solve these problems.

Just be aware that older students like your daughter move through Level 1 quickly. You may wish to buy at least Level 1 and 2 at one time, and maybe even Level 3 as well. We do have a 1 year, 100% satisfaction guarantee. http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/guarantee

Let me know if you need any further information or help.

Nicholette

says:

I nee to know if the “tree spelling” works for a child with some dyslexia.

I want a program that has the root words like this and adds the prefixes and suffixes. I think it may help her. She is ten years old and spelling is a nightmare for her most days. Se still is struggling with very basic words.
I am doing various exercises to help with the dyslexia . Can you email me if this spelling program will help her. Phonics zoo has been a horrid challenge for her, yet my son did all three years of phonics zoo this year and ran at an A- level the whole year. So great for him. Not so great for her.

Nicholette

says:

I need to know – (ha , I should have checked my own spelling before hitting post.)

Lydia R.

says:

Thanks for the download!

Erika Jones

says:

Latin tree roots looks like a great learning activity! Can’t wait to try them with my kids.

Laura

says:

Thanks for the download!

You’re so welcome, Laura. Hope you enjoy it!

Lynette Williams

says:

I am very interested in both AAR and AAS. This appears to work the way I think about reading and spelling. Since these are subjects I love that are a bit more of a challenge for my children, I am looking for options. The concept of word trees seems like one worth trying.

Meghan

says:

This looks really neat! My kids are a little young but I am hoping we will get to use this when they are older!

Rebekah Marcellus

says:

This looks like a great addition to our curriculum! Thank you.

Kris H.

says:

We have been doing the trees along with All About Spelling and it has really been a fun learning tool! My daughter loves to turn the trees into an art project as she fills in the new words! Thanks for all the helpful freebies!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Kris! I love that your daughter has gotten so much out of these word trees–an art project even!

mandy allen

says:

Neat! Will try

Loretta F Musser

says:

I love word root studies. ..definitely will use this!

Colleen

says:

Awesome resource! Definitely going to use it.

Kelly

says:

This looks like a great resource. I love the word tree. Thanks!

Katie

says:

Very cool! Downloading!

Jen Cox

says:

Love this! Downloading!

Sue Sanders

says:

This is a fabulous teaching tool.

ANNE BACHMEYER

says:

Love this!

Sara

says:

Love the concept of Teaching Latin Roots with Word Trees. Very interested in this program!

Jeannie

says:

I love how your materials are set up

christy kennedy

says:

We love AAR!

Linda

says:

Thank you for the chance to win some of your materials. We’ve heard wonderful things about them!

Andi

says:

I love your program. Thanks for all the extra tips and worksheets!

Sherri

says:

I am so excited about All About Reading and All About Spelling!

Carri N

says:

I’ve never thought to teach latin roots- this should be interesting!

Modern Mia

says:

I love this! I learned right alongside my kids. Thank you!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Mia!

Shirley South

says:

Can’t wait to use this with my boys

Sara B

says:

Wow, my oldest will love these!

naomie

says:

I want more!! Latin tree is great!!!

amber

says:

i am so excited about AAR & AAS!

Angie

says:

I am studying Latin and the origin of the romance languages so that I am better prepared to teach these things to my kids. I wasn’t sure that we needed a formal reading program because the other ones we used didn’t have much to offer. We would read a passage and then answer questions about the passage. It just didn’t seem worth the time or money when we already do that with so much of what we read. I love all of the things that All About Reading covers.

Angie,
Thank you for this lovely comment. All About Reading does cover more. Personally, I love that it even gets into introductory literary analysis!

Keep up the great work!

Mandy W

says:

I love the tree idea! And I love teaching my children Latin/Latin roots. Thanks for all the help!

WENDY MOFFITT

says:

This looks interesting!

Rebecca F

says:

What a great idea!!

Dora

says:

This is so cool! It makes me look forward to the upper levels of AAS!

Kate

says:

Thank you for the sneak peak into the more advanced levels of AAS! We’re only in levels 1 and 2.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Kate! Something to look forward to, right? :)

Laura Hubbard

says:

Love the idea!!!

Deborah Freeman

says:

Thank you for this! My girls are starting Latin in August.

mary

says:

We aren’t to level 7 in spelling yet, but this is truly a fantastic idea. I used to teach English to middle schoolers before becoming a homeschooling mama and really wish I would have known this cool trick then!

Jennifer

says:

Excited to try All about Reading!!!

Rebecca Spotswood

says:

Great idea! Thank you for the freebie!

Angela

says:

Heard great things about this program! I will be starting homeschool next year and am excited to pick all the curriculum for my chldren (PreK, G1 and G2) :)

Suzzanne n.

says:

I’m excited to try this with my son when he is a little older.

Amanda O'Neal

says:

I can’t wait to do this with my oldest the year after next. I love etymology!

cheryl babrick

says:

Would love to try this!

Kelli Weaver

says:

Absolutely love this program! It is great to use with any child with learning disabilities!

Rachel Tanenbaum

says:

My husband learned this way and has such a higher vocabulary and spelling ability. I am new to homeschooling and looking at all options. This looks fun and exciting:)

Amy Nelson

says:

Thank you for sharing this idea. I can definitely see how my oldest would find this useful!

Christa Hannasch

says:

What a great way to teach Latin!

Krissy

says:

love this!!

Margo

says:

My son would enjoy the tree system as he is a visual learner. The more visuals the better.

Renee

says:

This looks amazing!

Camille

says:

We can’t wait to start using this program with our daughter!

Melissa Terhorst

says:

Can’t wait to start!!

Lisa Peters

says:

I am so looking forward to using your programs with my budding reader!

Gina Hilton

says:

It’ll be nice to keep this in mind when we get to level 7.

Teresa

says:

This is a great program!!!

Kelly M

says:

I remember how much learning Latin roots helped me when I was in high school. This looks like a great resource!

Julie Saffold

says:

My son is really loving your products. We hope to be able to continue on with them.

Laurie Griess

says:

I look forward to experiencing this approach in Level 7. My oldest daughter will be using that next year.

Katie Jason

says:

I will have to save this for a future read!

Karen

says:

I was just debating earlier if I should eventually introduce Latin into our homeschool curriculum. I think this may have given me a nudge towards yes.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Ha, ha! I’m glad to be that nudge for you, Karen! Learning the Latin roots of words is not only invaluable in terms of spelling, but really helpful in regards to vocabulary too. I think you’ll find that learning Latin roots is the gift that keeps on giving. Have fun!

April Rakes

says:

Love the word tree!!

Rebecca

says:

In a way I just wish I could skip ahead of my kids and learn these things now. :)

Melissa Moore

says:

I have never seen this way to describe root words. I think that would be a good learning tool to helping a child be able to relate words. Thanks!

Denise

says:

Very interesting! Thanks!!

Lindsay Carpenter

says:

What a great tip! Thx!

Shannon

says:

I have never heard of reading trees…………we have a child with dyslexia.

DeAna

says:

Thank you so much for posting this! Definitely reaffirms the need to study some Latin. :D

Samantha

says:

Looks like a great program!

Christina

says:

I really like this information, thank you so much! :)

Heidi Zapolski

says:

I love these! I wish that I had learned Latin in school and have been debating on including it in my kids’ first home school year next year.

Cassy Brackett

says:

Wow, this is such a great way to teach root words. I am excited to look further into this curriculum for my school children.

Christy from Oregon

says:

We use All About Spelling (level 2) 4 days a week in our homeschool and I have seen a dramatic improvement with my dyslexic son. He is finally enjoying spelling and his reading has improved as well. It is a fun, interactive way to develop spelling skills. So glad we found this system!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I loved hearing about your son’s dramatic improvement, Christy! I’m thankful to hear that he’s been enjoying it so much as well! Win-win!

Vanessa Alvarez

says:

This is great!!! I wish someone would have taught me in this way when iwad in school! I guess I’m choosing homeschool to make sure my kids aren’t robbed of learning in the best way they that speaks to them. Thanks for sharing, soooo helpful.

Caroline

says:

Looks like fun! Any study of Latin roots is a good idea, because of the number of words in our language derived from Latin.

Kim Wheeler

says:

That looks like a wonderful idea!

REBECCA XAVIER

says:

Great idea. I have never thought of doing that.

Heather

says:

This is perfect!

Teresa

says:

I think this is a wonderful idea. I think this would really help my kids.

Kristine L

says:

This is a great idea… I’ll have to pin it for future use!

Donna Louis

says:

Can’t wait to add this to our curriculum.

Ashley

says:

Looking forward to this program!

s

says:

Im so excited to give this a try!

Danielle

says:

What a smart idea. Thank you for sharing.

Cindy

says:

I LOVE these! I can’t wait to start!

Robyn Yoon

says:

what a great idea to visualize the root word and see it altered throughout the tree. I will be using this concept for my 3 daughters.

Nancy

says:

This is an interesting technique.

Stephanie Kilgore

says:

Wow! I am very impressed so far with the bonuses of this curriculum and website. Latin is the basis for so many languages. Not only will it help our children understand our language but other languages as well. Thank you!!

Becki

says:

This is such a neat tool. I will be filing it away for the future. Thanks for all the wonderful tips!

Carol

says:

I am a teacher and homeschooler and completely agree that latin roots are an essential part to learning language!

Kimberly Searcy

says:

My daughter is learning Latin and this tree is AHHH-MAAAA-ZZZING. Thanks for sharing.

Kandi

says:

Love using both AAR and AAS. These products are just fabulous. I can’t recommend them enough. Always look forward to see what’s new! Love these new trees. great idea!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thank you so much for the kind words, Kandi. It’s nice knowing that AAR and AAS been a hit in your household!

Melanie Williams

says:

Love this idea! My daughter is in “first grade” and completing AAR 2, so I don’t think she is ready for this… I took Latin in college and it is interesting to connect the dots with word meanings. I will definitely be sharing this with her in the future!

Merry at AALP

says:

Yes, she’ll get to this in due time. Enjoy!

Grace

says:

Really cool idea. Thx.

Rhonda G

says:

Thanks for sharing.

KarenC

says:

I love this idea!!! You are definitely selling me on getting your program for my oldest, who will be in eighth grade next year!!

JK

says:

I’ve enjoyed using the AAS some and would like to get into roots. Looks like a wonderful addition to AAS!

Rachel

says:

I am so thankful I have found this program for my two boys. It is awesome!

Kim

says:

I would love to try this in our upcoming school year!

Sarah Stoelting

says:

I think my daughter will really enjoy using these…thanks!

Priscilla

says:

Awesome Resources! Great way to show new people your system!

Donna

says:

I’ve heard this can be very helpful.

Kristin Tabb

says:

We should try this! Great idea.

Alicia

says:

I learned latin roots in high school and it helped a lot in college. I know this will help my kids.

Cassandra Lacey

says:

Such a great idea and I couldn’t agree more regarding learning Latin roots as a way to help in spelling. I learned Latin and it definitely was helpful for me later on SATs, etc.

debbie azevedo

says:

We love all about spelling.

amanda

says:

Interesting

Heather

says:

What a wonderful idea!!

katie

says:

This is a great idea thanks for sharing!

Diana

says:

I’m holding to this one until my girls are at the upper levels. Great idea since so much of so many languages have a Latin base or influence in the least- Spanish, French, etc.

Malia

says:

Have been researching this for the last month. I really love what you have done with both the reading and spelling. Even if I’m not lucky enough to win I will be buying both programs…

Sandi W

says:

That’s really cool. I’ve never seen word trees before.

Malia

says:

Have been researching this for the last month. I really love what you have done with both the reading and spelling. Even if I’m not lucky enough to win I will be buying both programs…

This is one of the reasons we are learning Latin, it opens the door of knowledge to so many root words that word study becomes simple.

Carlyn Canady

says:

This is how I wanted to start my oldest daughter in spelling, but finances wouldn’t allow it. Hoping to use AAR/AAS for my second daughter beginning in the fall!

Mary Ann

says:

Wow! What a wonderful concept! I wished that the public school systems had used this when I was growing up! Of course this is a ingenious way of teaching so they will never use anything like it unfortunately! Why my last 2 children are being homeschooled! This is a absolute must for me to try with my kids, I think that they will Love it! Keep up the excellent work and thank you for sharing your wonderful ways to teach!

Jean

says:

I am excited to check out this curriculum. My daughter and I were just discussing her learning Latin.

Shanquita

says:

I am going to have to try this with my son. I think he would LOVE IT! Thank you.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Shanquita! Hope your son loves these Word Trees! Have fun!

Sara Williams

says:

When I was in school, I thought the latin roots were really interesting. But we didn’t learn them until 11th grade!!

Viv Sluys

says:

I think my daughters will enjoy using the word tree for Latin root words. We haven’t started any thing for Latin yet but we plan to start after the summer.

Jen R.

says:

I would love to try this curriculum!

Alisha Bilderback

says:

Thanks, can’t wait to check out the other blog entries.

Katy

says:

That looks really helpful, thanks for posting it!

Melissa

says:

This looks really helpful, thank you! I think my oldest two kids will really enjoy this.

Rachel

says:

Heard lots of great things about this reading program. Would love to try it with my boys!

veena

says:

I tried this with my students and they enjoyed to grow this tree!!
Pls let me know why do LD kids are feeling sleepy always and yawning often?

pkb

says:

I would say they are bored and not getting enough movement. Get em up out of their chairs and do some standing up activity. I teach in a home school tutorial, and sometimes we take a walk around the building they have to identify parts of speech as we walk. :)

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Veena,

Yawning can be a way for people to release anxiety or pressure–it can be a way of calming down the brain. Marie had a student who did this. She ignored it, and as the student got better at reading, it went away.

Charis

says:

This looks interesting to try. We’ve loved AAS so far. This year we’re doing levels 2 and 4.

KT

says:

These worksheets appear to be a great way to start teaching students about how language changes and incorporates into itself over time. Thanks so much for sharing them!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, KT!

Darcey

says:

I had never heard of this. Something to try.

Michelle

says:

This sounds great!

Gretchen L

says:

Intriguing. My daughter isn’t interested in learning Latin, so this seems like a great means of providing her with a more pleasant, but less intense exposure to the language.

Kristin C

says:

That’s cool! I know my son would find this interesting as well.

Mindy

says:

Love this idea!

Melissa

says:

My kids found this to be fun. It is a nice visual and helps them understand the importance of latin. Thank you!

Nancy Bram

says:

Love this lesson help. We use Word Roots to help with spelling and vocabulary and I see a big difference in my daughter’s spelling abilities now.

Tammi

says:

Thank you for the downloads. I am new to teaching Latin. Looking forward to using this.

becky hightower

says:

I use the tree for introducing the Latin roots, but I love yours with the prefixes and suffixes on the sheet. Awesome! Thanks!

Mary Lauritzen

says:

Love the spelling program; would love to try the reading program as well! We’re ready for Level 2 in AAS, will look forward to what’s ahead!

quinn

says:

Love this approach.

Elizabeth

says:

I love that you are including Latin roots! I plan on starting Latin with my children at a young age, and am excited that the roots will be included in AAS. I love the visual trees and I think I could use this lesson!

Tami Parker

says:

Yes! I believe in the importance of Latin roots, but have not studies them in a formal way with my children yet.

Stacy

says:

I can’t wait to use the Word Tree. Just for fun, my younger child is joining big sister in learning Latin roots. This activity sounds perfect for her.

C Kress

says:

Just wondering what age this is appropriate for? Or Is it meant to go with level 7 AAS? What a great visual aide :)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

If you are using the All About Spelling series, Word Trees are included in Level 7, so you can wait until you reach that level. If you aren’t using AAS, you can use them whenever your child is ready to spell words containing prefixes and suffixes.

S Welford

says:

Very good idea!

Alice Thompson

says:

This is great! I like the latin root tree!

Lindsay Ronning

says:

Trying to figure out how learning Latin can help with general Language understanding. It is exciting and I feel that I missed this in my education growing up.

Lindsay,
Isn’t it exciting to see how these word parts can build into such a wide range of words?!? Eye opening. Plus, Marie has made it fun with her Word Trees.

Melanie Bishop

says:

Never considered this before! Thank you!

sjohn

says:

Great giveaway! Thanks!

Elizabeth Beer

says:

This is an interesting way to think about and visualize Latin roots. Thanks for the idea!

Teri

says:

We are looking into Latin programs for next year. This looks great!

Allison Johnson

says:

This looks awesome. I can’t wait until we get to this level of AAS!

renate m braddy

says:

Hi Marie!

We are new to homeschooling…VERY new and trying out resources. Latin is one of those things that just SOUNDS intimidating so I couldn’t figure out how I would teach it. I found a website called Visual Latin yesterday and tried my son on it this morning. He LOVED it and watched it twice! So, what I have learned is that even if I am not the expert in a subject-there is someone else out there that IS and can pass on their knowledge in a way I never could. Homeschooling to me means never being alone-there are millions of people and resources!

connie

says:

This is great thanks!

Carol

says:

Interesting! I was pondering Latin with my younger kids the other day. At what age should they start to learn it?

Rebekah

says:

What a wonderful way to learn rootwords. I will have to use this to teach my children

Kim

says:

My little guy will really enjoy this! Thanks for posting!

Denise S

says:

Great idea! :) Love the way this is hands on and visual!

pkb

says:

LOVE this concept. You wouldn’t happen to hava PDF file of an “empty tree” would you? I can probably create one from your first example, but just thought I would ask!
Thanks!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I uploaded a blank Word Tree for you here: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/content/downloads/Word-Tree-blank.pdf.

Misty

says:

Thank you. I was looking for a blank Word Tree as well.

pkb

says:

Thank you thank you thank you!
or should I say, Gratias!!

Cindy

says:

Just the program I have been looking for. You have thought of everything. I would love to try it with my new reader and speller.

Christianne

says:

We just love AAL’s products. We haven’t been able to “keep up” on a steady routine but when we are, the results are immediate and awesome. Now with latin as part of the curriculum, that will be an added bonus! We will have to add this to our day. Thanks Marie Ripple for an outstanding way to teach our kids!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Christianne!

KC

says:

Can’t wait to try this with my English Language Learners

Kortnei

says:

I am home schooling my son with ASD and have been struggling to teach him to learn to read. We started with Level 1 and we are flying through it! He actually enjoys to read! I will defiantly recommend this curriculum for anyone with children on the spectrum!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Kortnei, I’m overjoyed to hear about your son’s progress! The fact that he is enjoying reading now is music to the ears. Thank you so much for sharing the good news.

Heather H

says:

Those are great! I hope you will make a book of them!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

There are many more Word Trees in Level 7 of All About Spelling. In addition, the teacher’s manual contains an appendix with additional Latin roots and words derived from those roots for those who wish to have extra practice. I’m glad you liked the sample!

Renee

says:

What a wonderful idea! I took etymology in school and loved it. I think my students will love this way of learning how to spell.

Daena

says:

Fantastic! Can’t wait to use this!

Edith Harnish

says:

This will be exciting to implement into our Latin program or even as a review at the end of this year. A fun activity. Thank you for all you do! You are a great asset to homeschool families.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thank you for your kind words, Edith! I hope you and your children enjoy the Word Trees.

Karen Abbott

says:

I am a teacher retiring after 35+ years. It makes me sad that I always find “better ways” of teaching things that I will never get to try. I have long been a supporter of Latin and Greek roots but the trees are such a clever idea and I think the kids would love it. I will use it this last quarter but it sure would have been a great activity to use all year long. As a grandma I will continue to use your sight for book recommendations.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Karen, I’m glad that you will be able to use the Word Trees for your final quarter of teaching. Enjoy! Perhaps you will become a literacy tutor after you retire, or help your grandchildren through any rough spots. :)

Amy Machin

says:

I think this would really help my boys see the connection between words with the same root!

Nancy Heilman

says:

I am trained in 3 levels of Orton-Gillingham here in the Minneapolis area (& slated to take Level 4 this summer) through OG of Minnesota. I have a small caseload of students that I teach/tutor outside of their school day (most of them with dyslexia diagnoses). I purchased all the levels of your ‘All About Spelling’ curriculum a year or more ago and have a large white board set up, with all the tiles from levels 1 & 2. I simply have not gotten around to perusing/setting up Levels 3 on up. This (your featuring of how you teach Latin roots) is JUST what I needed to motivate myself to open up & begin using your higher levels. Your stuff is amazing. I teach Latin roots, but your graphic tree concept is awesome!!!! I am a very visual person, and your stuff is so visual & kinesthetic. You hit the nail on the head.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Nancy! I’m glad that the Word Trees were motivating to you! Level 7 contains a blank Word Tree, along with many other Latin roots, so I hope that will be helpful to your students.

Angel

says:

Is there a way to buy this program, or is it included in your spelling program? If so what level?
I didn’t see it for individual purchase.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Angel! The Word Trees are included in All About Spelling Level 7.

Colleen

says:

Marie, another great idea! I can’t wait to try it with the kids tomorrow.

Stephanie R

says:

Is this included in Level 7 of All About Spelling? We are slowly working our way there and only on book 4 now. Just wondering if I need to save it or if it will be in the book when we get there.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

These Word Trees are included in Level 7 of All About Spelling.

Krysta Walker

says:

Will definitely try this at home! Really helps to make the connection!

ena

says:

These maps are sooo awesome!!! I love helping children find these connections. It helps things stick.

Sara Alexander

says:

I’m trying this. Thank you so much!

Jessica B.

says:

I really like this idea. I taught Latin and Greek roots when I was an 8th grade LA teacher and look forward to incorporating them into my kids’ homeschool studies as well.

Nerissa

says:

Marie, I love this for my child!! I have been seeking curriculum for my child for months (mostly free or inexpensive) and I use different ones or just even subject matter material. I mostly look for material where my child is learning but in a fun way, if you know what mean. With that being said, I love this Teaching Latin Roots with Word Trees. It’s simply and fun. If you have any other GREAT ideas PLEASE keep me posted

Hi Nerissa! Thanks for your enthusiasm! :) The best way to keep up-to-date with the latest free downloads is to sign up on this page: http://info.allaboutlearningpress.com/newsletter.

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