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Fun Ways to Count Syllables

If your child has trouble counting syllables, or if you are teaching this concept for the first time, this post is for you! Read on to discover four fun ways to count syllablesand while you’re at it, be sure to check out all the extra practice activities and download a free printable “Count the Syllables” game.

But first, a quick definition …

What Are Syllables?

A syllable is a “word chunk” that contains a single vowel sound. A word may have one, two, or even more syllables. For example:

  • bat has one vowel sound and therefore one syllable
  • sticky has two vowel sounds and therefore two syllables
  • south has one vowel sound—/ow/—and therefore one syllable
Monkey pointing out the three word chunk syllables in the word 'fantastic'

Four Easy Ways to Count Syllables

Most of us learned to count syllables with the first method below, the Clap Method. But for a little extra variety and a lot of extra fun, I’ve included three other effective methods. If your child just doesn’t “get it” with one of the methods, take a short break and then try a different one!

1. The Clap Method. The Clap Method is the most common way to teach syllable counting, and it works well for most students. Say the word and clap the syllables, like this:

2. The Hum Method. With the Hum Method, you hum the word instead of saying the word. Count the number of hums.

3. The Talk-Like-a-Robot Method. When you use the Talk-Like-a-Robot Method, you pretend you’re a robot and say the word in a robotic tone, with a pause between each word chunk.

4. The Jump Method. Get active! For each syllable, jump in place. Croc-o-dile would be three hops. Hap-py would be two hops.

Count Syllables with this Adorable Game!

Your child can use any of the four methods above (Clap, Hum, Talk-Like-a-Robot, or Jump) to practice counting syllables with this free printable game.

Page spread of download for Fun Ways to Count Syllables

Count Syllables with SIX Fun Activities

Counting syllables is an important phonemic awareness activity, and that’s why we teach it several different ways in the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs. Children who have acquired this skill generally learn to read and spell much more easily. But don’t despair if your child doesn’t pick up this skill right away! It’s a rather abstract concept that can take time and repetition to sink in.

Here are some additional activities that can help your child identify syllables.

A red and blue drum

1. Sing simple songs with a STRONG BEAT that your child knows.

For example, “Yankee Doodle.” Clap out each beat in the song like this: “Yank – ee – Doo – dle – went – to – town – a – rid – ing – on – a – po – ny.” Or you could try beating out the rhythm on a homemade drum (box and spoon, or oatmeal container and chopsticks). Call it music class, and work on it a little each day. Be sure to pick songs in which each syllable is sung on only one beat.

2. Play a robot game with your child.

Your child gives you a word, and you say it in your best robotic voice, separating the syllables. Then switch roles—you give your child a word to try. Have a contest to see who can sound the most like a robot!

Football

3. Clap the syllables in compound words.

Clap once for foot, once for ball, and then put it together and clap twice for football. Other compound words that work well include cobweb, backpack, rainbow, toothbrush, cupcake, popcorn, and airplane. You can get some extra mileage out of this activity by using it as you teach and practice compound words, too!

4. Turn mealtime into practice time.

At mealtime, use the food on your plate as inspiration for a syllable counting game. One at a time, each family member announces what he is eating. As you say what you’re eating, playfully break up the words into chunks. “I’m eating a pic-kle!” “Would you like some spa-ghet-ti?” “Please pass the sal-ad.

Cartoon zebra

5. Play “going to the zoo.”

Take turns calling out animal names and, if possible, the sounds they make. Then everyone can jump, beat, or clap to the syllables. Here are a few examples: “I went to the zoo, and I saw a kan-ga-roo.” “I went to the zoo, and I saw a ze-bra!” “I went to the zoo, and I saw a tur-key, and the tur-key said, gob-ble-gob-ble!”

6. Clap the syllables in the names of friends and family members.

This is also a wonderful way for your child to work on remembering all his relatives’ names!

Keep It Fun!

Above all, keep your syllable counting practice light and playful, and if your child doesn’t understand right away, try again in a week or so with a different method or activity. Need a reminder? Download the handy chart below and hang it right on your fridge!

4 Ways to Count Syllables downloadable chart

Does your child know how to count syllables? Which of these activities have you tried?

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Leave a Comment

Deanna

says:

If my child gets the wrong count using the clap method I have her put her hand on her chin and we count the number of times her hand moves down.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Deanna,
Yes, the under the chin method is very helpful at times. Thank you for mentioning it!

Beth Tuecke

says:

The clap method has not worked for many of my children. I can’t wait to try some of these other great ideas. Thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Beth,
One further idea, that is sometimes a game changer for children, is to have them place a hand under their chin and count how many times their chin goes down. The chin drops once per syllable. This is especially helpful for tricky words, like mile, that can sound like two syllables in many accents. However, even if sounds like two syllables for you, your chin will drop just once.

Kelli

says:

Great suggestions!

Lisa

says:

My almost 7 year old has never understood syllables. She could never figure it out. I was dreading teaching them in All About Spelling. We did it yesterday, and the hand under the chin technique worked okay. Then last night, I found this. We did the monkey game today with the humming method, she finally got it! She got everything right and says syllables are easy. YAY! Thank you so much!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lisa,
This is wonderful! Thank you for coming back and letting us know that the humming method provided the breakthrough for your daughter. Keep practicing syllables to ensure she has truly mastered them, but this is definitely the turning point!

Mary M.

says:

That robot one is going to be a hit! Thanks.

Aimee

says:

I love the humming idea. We have always done the hand under the chin, but that is sometimes hard for younger children. The humming is what I am going to try!

Tatum

says:

Thank you for the fun games and visuals!

Angelina

says:

Great post – thank you for the handy game!

Mary Height

says:

Other ways are to count jaw drops as the word is being said slowly. A second way is to have a row of colored cubes or stickers on a card and the child points to a cube or sticker on a card for each syllable and then goes back to see how many cubes or stickers they have touched while saying the word when they have finished saying the word. Dice that are placed in numerical order are also suitable to be used for older children so that if the word has three syllables the final syllable will be pronounced while pointing to a die that represents three. I have also used numbers written on palm cards for older children. These are not as much fun as Marie’s methods but they do work, especially with older or shy children!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for all these ideas, Mary. And they do sound fun, if not as jumpy! I especially like your dice idea.

Donald Knight

says:

Interesting variations to teaching syllables.

This was taught to my kids in kindergarten as a way to sound out words to help spell them but, then unused until second grade when the same idea behind the sounding out of words can be applied to syllables. Trying to get my now 2nd grader to refigure this one out again LOL

Kelli C

says:

Great ideas! I’m saving this for when we start AAS!

Denise

says:

We used this to reinforce counting syllables. Fun!

Michelle Drake

says:

Thanks for the great ideas! This is a hard concept to teach and it frustrates my daughter. I am excited to try some of these suggestions with her, and play the game! Things just seem to be more acceptable as a game.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
If your daughter has trouble with counting the syllables in a word, try having her hold her hand under her chin and say the word. Have her count how many times her chin goes down. Each time it goes down is one syllable. Once she gets pretty good at doing it that way, then go back to clapping and jumping syllables.

If she continues to have problems, let us know so that we can help.

Melinda Penfold

says:

Thank you for the great suggestions. The jumping works well with very active boys. This is a great way to add variety to our day.

Dania

says:

Thank you for these suggestions!

Allison Breuker

says:

These are excellent suggestions. Some time we get stuck in ruts and this is a great way to make it fun and different.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Allison,
Yes, sometimes a simple change up like these can make a world of difference!

Kelly

says:

My son will love the bouncing way to count them.

Grace

says:

My dyslexic son loves AAR

Katie

says:

Love to use these ideas!

Gwen Meyer

says:

Never heard of a couple of these! Very fun!

Is there a right way and a wrong way for syllable breaks? We aren’t always in agreement here. For example, which would be correct; bu-tter, but-ter, or butt-er?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Shannon,
It depends on what you are dividing the word for.

All About Reading and All About Spelling teach rules for dividing syllables as following these rules helps students to know how to read or spell the word. Our syllable division rule #2 teaches that if a word had two consonants between two vowels, we divide the word between the consonants. According to this rule, butter would be divided but-ter. This helps students to know that the u should be pronounced with the short /uh/ sound, because the first syllable is “closed”, meaning that the syllable ends in a consontant not a vowel. Vowels in a closed syllable are most commonly short. If the word were divided bu-tter the first syllable would be open, meaning it ends in a vowel, and the vowel in an open syllable is most commonly long. The word would then be pronounced byooter. For spelling, knowing these syllable division rules help even more. A student will easily know that she must double the t in butter in order to protect the short vowel sound of the first syllable.

However, if you are dividing words into syllable based on how we pronounce words, then things get more interesting. We don’t say the /t/ sound twice in butter, so the bu-tter or butt-er divisions make sense from that point of view. However, many English speakers don’t say the /t/ sound at all in butter; we say /d/ instead. This is why dictionaries show syllable divisions that don’t necessarily show the word the same as it is spelled. Looking at three different online dictionaries, I saw the syllable division for butter written as [buht-er], (bŭt-er), and ‘bəd-ər.

So, for reading and spelling, butter should be divided but-ter. For pronunciation, however, it could be different.

I hope this helps with your discussions.

Ashley Drechsler

says:

We love all about reading and spelling. This is a fantastic program!!!

Maggie

says:

Thanks for these great suggestions! My daughter would love the jumping activity :)

Sunette

says:

Thank you for this post. I remember the clap from school days, but I know my children will benefit from the different methods. Love your posts.

Nicole Brown

says:

We are 12 lessons into the pre-reading and my daughter is showing so much progress. She struggled with rhyming, syllable counting, and the difference between words and letters in a sentence. I look forward to trying these activities as we continue in the program!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Nicole,
Thank you for letting us know that your daughter is improving with our Pre-reading level. If you run into further difficulties, please let us know so we can help.

Heather Lucas

says:

Such a an awesome curriculum I think. We just bought AAS 1 & 2 and AAR PR I am excited about using this for many years to come!

Kristina Ebrom

says:

This made a big difference in our daily reading. It truly helped our daughter to step out and try reading more complex words. She discovered that she could read any work braking the word down into syllables.

Merry

says: Customer Service

That’s wonderful, Kristina. Thanks so much for letting us know. Congratulations to you and your daughter!

Lindsay

says:

Thank you, this is so helpful! My first grader son has a tough time with syllables because he’s so used to sounding out words phoneme by phoneme. These resources are awesome!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lindsay,
All About Reading works extensively on how to read multisyllable words starting at the beginning of level 2. We teach to read a syllable at a time, and teach how to identify the syllables before beginning.

Jamie

says:

My 6yo LOVES the jump method. I think the robot voice is going to be a hit, so we’ll be trying that next.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jamie,
The robot voice may result in lots of giggles!

Terri

says:

Thank you for the suggestions.

Shannon Danaher

says:

Very interested in trying your products with my kiddos.

Andrea

says:

My son always did best with clapping!

Kayla Campbell

says:

Thanks for this. Great info!

Wendy

says:

I only knew the clap method. The others sound so fun!

Amanda Coleman

says:

This post was so helpful! Thanks!

Joy

says:

Love this! Thanks!

Ann

says:

My son loves clapping the syllables, and it makes it so easy for him!

kim guess

says:

Love AAS!

Amber Gleaves

says:

Great ideas!

Martha

says:

This sounds so fun and I can use it for both my kids!

Kaylee

says:

This tip has helped my child in third grade, as she learns multi-syllabic words that become increasingly complicated.

Carol D.

says:

Such wonderful tricks. My kids like clapping and jumping the syllables.

Erin Lange

says:

My daughter likes to call syllables! I love the other tips as well!

Erin Lange

says:

*clap*…autocorrect fail

Kristen

says:

Great ideas!

Tami Palmer

says:

Awesome advice

Jenni

says:

Fun! I can see the kiddos enjoying the robot-talk best.

Coralie

says:

My son has a speech delay, and had a hard time hearing the breaks or rhythms of syllables. It was the vowel rule (one vowel sound per syllable) that gave him the breakthrough he needed.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Coralie,
Thank you for sharing how the rule about every syllable having to have a vowel helped your son understand syllables better. Interesting.

Leslie

says:

Perfect! Using this with my intervention group this week! Thanks!

Jess

says:

My kids will love the robot talk! Thanks for the suggestion

Catherine

says:

Clap method is great. Movement always seems to help us with learning. Thanks!

Kelli

says:

My child loves to count syllables using the clap method.

Teresa

says:

Thank you for the tips!

Mandi

says:

Great ideas!

Katie

says:

Great tips

Jessica

says:

Thank you for making your lessons so fun and engaging for kids!

Samantha

says:

I have always used the clap method but love the activiness of jumping!

Rhonda

says:

Great suggestions! Thank you!

Michelle Long

says:

I think we will try the jump option, sounds fun!

Eryn

says:

Clapping would be our favorite so far. Fun new ideas to try though!

Sharon Ellington

says:

We love clapping our syllables!

Kristina M.

says:

Great post!

Kathy Shearer

says:

We like clapping out syllables the best!

Melissa

says:

These are so great. I’ve been mostly using the clap method with a couple students, but we sometimes use the tap it out method too – use a different finger to tap each syllable on the tabletop, so when you’ve finished the word, you can see how many syllables it was. Sometimes it’s hard to remember how many times you clapped. :)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melissa,
I like your tapping a different finger on the table for each syllable to help count how many there are. Great idea, thanks for sharing it!

Jen R.

says:

Love it! Y daughter does the clapping method. I think she’d like the jumping method as well.

Audra

says:

Such fun ways to practice syllables! I love all these extras you provide!

Sherry

says:

My daughter does the clapping method, I’ll definitely look into using the others on my next child coming through as she is more rambunctious.

Lada

says:

Love everything about AAS!!

Jennifer

says:

My daughter loves the clap method and I think my son is going to really like the robot method!

Laura

says:

Great ideas! My daughter likes to talk like a robot so I’ll keep that one in mind!

Cindy

says:

The jump method is wonderful for active students!

Tami

says:

What great suggestions! Thank you for the download too.

Priscilla

says:

I grew up using the clap method, but I like the idea or using the robot voice with my boys. How fun!

Jacque Cialone

says:

We normally use the clap method but I’m thinking we need to try to talk like a robot!

Rachelle Boe

says:

We’ve used the clap method. It seems to be working with my 6 year old. I’m really thankful we switched to AAR!

Tawnya Lynne

says:

I like the robot method, how fun!

Amanda Perry

says:

We have successfully used the “clap method”. Took my daughter awhile but she finally could break up syllables accurately in second grade.

Sabrina

says:

This is so helpful!

MaryAnne

says:

Good ideas.

Tara

says:

We are working on syllables and decoding a little everyday.

Karen

says:

We used the chin tap method by putting his hand an inch under his chin. When he slowly said the word, his chin would bump his hand once per syllable

Kris

says:

Most often, we use jumping. I never thought about humming, may have to try that soon (and talk like a robot too)!

Maureen J.

says:

I love these ideas. We have a “My Little Pony” home so I need to brush up on my Rainbow Dash & Pinkie Pie voices. Lol!

Laura

says:

Great ideas!

Kathy D.

says:

I like the idea of jumping to count syllables for my active son!!

Tricia schlegel

says:

Great ideas.

Kim

says:

We have just started using some of these ideas with our struggling reader. Thank you so much for all the ideas.

Tammy

says:

We have used these ideas with pre-reader…she enjoys them so much.

CMB

says:

Great ideas!

Andy

says:

Thanks for all the AAR resources!

Donna Louis

says:

Wonderful ideas.

Katie Bemis

says:

Thanks for the great ideas!!

Sarah

says:

These are great suggestions! My son prefers the clap method right now but I can definitely see my daughter using a more “active” method once we get there with her.

Joanna A

says:

I’ll have to remember the jump method for my high energy 4yo when she’s ready.

Maria

says:

These are some really fun ideas!! Thanks!

Vanessa

says:

Thanks for the tips! We love AALP!

Danielle Taylor

says:

This is such a great idea! Definitely going to use it in the future when we get into reading words with multiple syllables!

Lisa

says:

We just referenced this article when we wanted to practice syllable counting. Jumping and clamping is her favorite things to do to get her moving while learning. It was just natural.

Sarah

says:

Good idea!! This would work well with my 7 year old son!

Radha

says:

Loved the ideas and it going to so much fun with the various ways to count the syllables!!! The printable is handy and very useful. Thanks a ton!

Robin

says:

Great ideas! I love the printable chart, too!

Patsy

says:

This is perfect. My daughter is currently on AAR level 2 & is struggling with counting syllables correctly. Thank you so much!

Kiran

says:

Wonderfuland simple new ways to count syllables! Thanks a lot for sharing!

Kiran

says:

Very innovative and fun methods to count syllables. Thanks for sharing!

Ashley

says:

Hoping I win the $100 giveaway😁

Ashley

says:

This is our favorite way to learn syllables!

Lynell

says:

I would love to win!

Jenny

says:

Thanks for the refresher! We just started learning how to count syllables, and I needed some new ideas. I absolutely love all of your materials, and I am so grateful you have worked so hard to give us such amazing teaching tools. Love it all!!!

Kris

says:

We started with clapping but can’t wait to reinforce with all these ideas!

Samara

says:

Awesome tips! Thank you!

Carrie Platte

says:

I love all these great tips!

We LOVE All About Spelling and All About Reading at our house!

Andrea

says:

Thanks for these great tips!

April

says:

After long nights trying to figure out which program would be best, I believe this may be to one! So excited to start!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

April,
I know that mixed feeling of excitement and relief you get when you finally make a decision about curriculum!

Let us know if you need any help with placement or anything else.

Sarah Nicole Phillips

says:

These are great! Thanks for all the ideas. I always taught the “clap” method, but not every child understands when to clap.

Kelly Jeter

says:

My boys love the activities and the whole body movement ideas.

Lisa kearse

says:

Wow! Great suggestions. Thank you!

Candice Heltz

says:

Fun ideas!

Jamie L

says:

Great ideas!

Deanna S

says:

These ideas are great, so fun! Thanks!

CASSANDRA HUBER

says:

My son is learning to read, so this is right up our alley at the moment.

LeeAnn

says:

This is such a great way to learn!

Marie greenhalgh

says:

Love the robotic voice method. Totally works for my son. He’s always talking like a robot!🤣

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Marie,
Talking like a robot can help with spelling sometimes too! When we over pronounce all syllables, like a robot, we can more easily hear how to spell. Take the word cabin, for example. Since the second syllable is unstressed, the i takes on the schwa sound, making it unclear which vowel to use for spelling. When we over-pronounce the word as “cab-IN,” it becomes clear that the letter i is used.

Yvonne Hurlbert

says:

Thank you so much for this. My child was just asking me today what a syllable was, but I didn’t know what to tell her. Now I have a definition for her!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yvonne,
I’m happy this post was so timely for you!

Carol

says:

We’re learning to count syllables now. We love the jumping method!

Stevie

says:

Love AAS!!! I bought it initially for my middle son who is dyslexic. However, I have used it with all four of my kids with great success. I have even learned things from it.😊

Brenda

says:

Stevie, What else worked well for your son with Dyslexia?
Thanks, Brenda

Molly

says:

What do you do about words that are one syllable but sound like they are two when said? Even the word – mouth – trips up my son as he claps it as two syllables.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Molly,
Is your son saying the word slowly? When counting syllables it is easy to add syllables when you try to say the word slowly. Mou-th. It is important that he tries to count the syllables while saying the word at a normal pace. Mouth.

If that doesn’t fix his problem, then have him place his hand under his chin and count how many times his chin goes down as he says the word. Each time the chin goes down is one syllable. This is really helpful for tricky words, such as mile. In some regional accents, mile sounds like two syllables. However, even when you say mi-le, the chin goes down just once. It is a one syllable word.

Counting syllables is a tricky skill, and a couple of my children needed it practice it periodically for years before they could always get it correct easily. Keep at it and keep it as fun as possible. Another way to make it fun is to choose words that relate directly to your child or something that happened to him recently. Today with my daughter when we reviewed counting syllables I used “crosses” and “earrings” among other words, referring to her new cross earrings. It made her happy.

I hope this helps. Let us know how it goes and if you need any further help.

Kendra

says:

Thank you, Robin, for mentioning the chin method! This has always been my personal favorite :).

Marikam

says:

It´s so great idea! Thank you so much fot that.

Sue Sasko

says:

Another method that’s very effective, although not as fun, is to put your hand under your chin and count how many times it comes down when you say the word.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sue,
Yes, I agree. The hand under the chin is my fallback method for whenever counting syllable gets tricky.

Geraldine MacCarthy

says:

Love these ideas. Thank you.

Noora

says:

These are Great and genious ways indeed. I’d enjoy them myself with my children.I would like apply them in my classes.

andrea

says:

Great ideas! They will make syllable counting much more fun and memorable.

Vidhya narasimhan

says:

Found all the methods interesting, especially that said by Ms.Laura….

Cindy

says:

So long as I do the beats (which we’ve done with a variety of methods), my child can get it easily, but when left on his own, he still wants to break the word into sounds instead of beats. Words with a long blend at the end especially throw him (e.g. plants). Do I just keep providing the beats until it finally sinks in?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Cindy,
Ask him to put his hand under his chin when he says the word. When counting syllables, remind him that he has to say the word normally, not slowly. Then, have him count how many times his chin goes down when he says the word. He should be able to count that his chin goes down just one time when he says plants.

Also, until he starts to find counting syllables easy, try avoiding words with blends. When he can count 1 and 2 syllable words without consonant blends easily without you giving the beat, then start introducing blends again.

Keep practicing regularly, as this concept can be very tricky for some kids. I have had a couple kids that needed to review counting syllables for years before they could always do it easily.

I hope this gives you some help, but please let us know if you have further questions.

Melissa

says:

thank you
we will enjoy the game :-)

Becky

says:

BrillIant post! So helpful, even for adults who struggle with counting syllables.

Laura B.

says:

All four of these methods suffer from something that causes additional problems for kids with LDs though — difficulty with processing multiple things at the same time. This is especially true with words that have 3+ syllables — “I know it was more than 2, was it 3 or 4?” Full body motion, humming, and so on doesn’t help kids keep track of how many they’re counting AS they’re counting. For kids who have issues with trying to count while they are saying a word aloud (or humming it), raising fingers as each one goes by can help — then they can look at what they counted, instead of trying to have both numbers and sounds in the same attentional “brain space” at the same time.

Also, something not mentioned here, but SUPER helpful for kids who don’t really “get” this whole “beats in a word” thing is this: place one hand flat underneath your chin, then say the word (and count up on your other hand if that helps) while you say the word. Your chin will drop with each vowel sound. How many syllables? How many vowel sounds? They should be the same! So if your chin drops twice, it’s a two-syllable word! This takes some initial careful teaching, but it can be *well* worth it with kids who have learning challenges that make it hard to figure out how syllables are different from sounds.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Laura,
Thank you for this! Using fingers to count is very helpful, although with children that struggle as you described it would be best to stick with 1 and 2 syllable words, at least until the task become easier.

Placing a hand under the chin and counting how many times it goes down is another great method for counting syllable. I find it especially helpful for tricky words that can sound like they have two syllables when they only have one, such as mile. In some regional accents, mile can sound like mi-le. Yet, even if you say it like that the chin only drops once.

Again, thank you for sharing these helpful tips.

Brenda

says:

What helps with Modulation and Tone? She’s still struggling….She just talking 5 years ago; sounds like a deaf person —but perfect hearing!!
Does has that frustrating APD…Figure…she can say Unacceptable…..but sometimes can’t do 3 syllables!! I’ve said that a lot to her; now that she is 18; she says that to me!! lol (Student becomes the teacher); but she usually will take the time to repeat until it gets better. Same with reading; it looks like all the D’s!! But, she “loves” to read…and she is still very persistent!! Her AHA will catch up with one day!! (Prayerfully)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Brenda,
I think your daughter would benefit from speech therapy to help her with modulation and tone. A good therapist will give “homework” too so that you and she can work between appointments.

You could try modeling and see if your daughter can repeat certain phrases, reading with expression and so on. I think they may use singing to help with this too. However, this is too far outside my field of knowledge for me to be of much help.

Jaclyn Stephens

says:

Thank you so much ! Very helpful

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