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W Is for Watermelon Craft

child draws on her lowercase w craft

Bring a bit of summer into your letter learning! Your preschooler will be wowed by this juicy and delicious ABC Craft. But when she’s done with her lowercase W craft, be sure to save a piece of watermelon for us!

Here’s What You’ll Need

Instructions for Assembling Your Lowercase W Craft

  1. Print the W Is for Watermelon Craft templates.
  2. Cut out the templates and trace the letter W and the watermelon fruit and seeds onto card stock.
  3. Cut out the letter W and watermelon pieces.
  4. Glue the watermelon fruit piece onto a full sheet of card stock (we used yellow, but you can use any color you like).
  5. Position the letter W over the watermelon fruit as shown in the example and glue in place.
  6. Glue the seeds to the watermelon fruit.
  7. Use a green marker to draw the details on the W as shown in the example.

child glues her lowercase w craft child adds piece to her lowercase w craft children add piece to their lowercase v craft

Learning with Your Letter W Craft

As you and your child assemble your W Is for Watermelon Craft, practice saying /w/–/w/–watermelon together. You can find more tips for working on pre-reading skills with your preschooler in this handy download.

child displays her lowercase w craft

We would LOVE to see how your lowercase W craft turns out! Please share your photos with us on our Facebook page, or tag your Instagram photos with the hashtag #allaboutABCcrafts!

Want More ABC Crafts?

page spread from the abc crafts lowercase series download

Free Lowercase ABC Letter Crafts

For crafts that start with lowercase letters A through Z, get the complete printable set of ABC Craft for Lowercase Letters.

page spread from the abc crafts uppercase series download

Free Uppercase ABC Letter Crafts

For crafts that start with uppercase letters A through Z, get the complete printable set of ABC Craft for Uppercase Letters.

Photos by: Rachel Neumann

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Hannah

says:

Super cute! I am really loving All About Reading for my kindergartener!

Tiffany

says:

Awesome idea!

Paula

says:

So cute! Looking forward to making the alphabet booklets with my kiddos.

Melanie

says:

My boys loved doing these crafts! We did all of the upper and lower case letters in a book for their preschool years. Thank you for the great idea!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Melanie, for letting us know that your boys enjoyed these crafts! It’s great to hear that children are learning and having fun with the activities we have.

Ang

says:

I pieced together something like this for my 8 year olds when they were preschool aged – now that I have 4 kiddos in tow, it’ll be great to just pop on here to get some educational activities for their preschool aged brother while I work with the olders (he totally wants to be included in school, so this is great!)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m glad this will help you have fun activities without all the time commitment, Ang! As a mom-of-many myself, I understand how important that is.

Tulisha Scott

says:

My boys have been enjoying watermelon that we grew in our garden. They would really like making this craft!

Lindsey

says:

This looks like a fun educational craft my little will like! Thank you!

Nicole

says:

I love these crafts! Not only does it work on letter recognition, but the cutting and pasting skills. Plus my boys do much better with letters when they can relate them to some. We recently watched Peter Pan, now they see P and know P is for Peter Pan.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Nicole,
Yes! Being able to relate new information to previously learned information is very important for memory. We even have a blog post on the science of it, How Making Connections Helps Your Child’s Memory.

Kristen

says:

I love how easy it is to find fun letter crafts on this website. I can’t wait to make the W watermelon craft with my son!

April

says:

Do you introduce upper or lowercase letters first? Since lowercase letters are much more commonly used, it seems lower would make sense, but then are uppercase letters easier to draw?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

April,
We introduce uppercase letters first in our Pre-reading program. We discuss this in our How to Teach the Alphabet to Preschoolers blog post. Not only are capital letters easier to write, but they are much less likely to cause letter reversal problems. With capitals, only M and W are easily confused when rotated or flipped. With lowercase, reversal problems with letters are much more likely. Learning capitals first can help reduce letter reversal problems for many children.

Michelle Dalton

says:

I can’t wait to try this with my little boy!

Sharon Smith

says:

I like this one as well it’s pretty cool

Kaileigh

says:

Hello,
I’m curious about how your teach the /w/ sound. I learned in another literacy program to teach it more like a “wooo” sound. This makes sense to me as it removes the schwa sound off the traditional “whuh”, which is an issue with the way a lot of sounds are taught (e.g. “buh” “tut” “kuh”, etc.) I’m interested what your thoughts are.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kaileigh,
Good question.

We attempt to teach all consonant sounds in as much isolation as possible. The problem is, however, that many consonant sounds are almost impossible to say without a vowel sound following. Have you tried to say /r/ without it sounding like /ruh/ or /er/? It’s so hard!

Check out our free Phonogram Sounds app available for all devices and through a web browser. You will hear that it does have a hint of a /uh/ sound with the /w/. It took hours of recording to make this app and we tried many different ways of saying consonants. R took more than 100 different recordings all by itself!

When our voice person pronounced certain consonants, including W and R, with no vowel sound, the consonant sound wasn’t recognizable at all. What was settled on was a minimal vowel sound following consonants as necessary for clarity.

However, the Phonogram Sounds app is only an optional aid for All About Reading and All About Spelling. You don’t have to use it, and you can teach your child to make that more /oo/ sort of vowel sound following /w/ instead of the /uh/ sort. It is really much the same thing, just a slightly different sound.

Does this help you? Let me know if you have additional questions or need more information.

Rachelle Seuntjens

says:

I love this idea! My son loves letters, so I will definitely be using this and other letter activities that I find. Thanks so much!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are very welcome, Rachelle! I hope your son and you have lots and lots of fun with these. 😊

Britney Turner

says:

Will definitely be trying this and the other letter crafts, just what I was looking for!

Cheree McClain

says:

I love this idea. We will have a preschooler in about 2 years. We currently have a 6th grader homeschooling.

Christina Lam

says:

Such a cute craft idea! Will try this. Thank you!

Merry

says: Customer Service

We hope you and your little one have fun with it, Christina!

Sarah

says:

Very nice! My son loves crafts!

Joy Kevanian

says:

Love this idea! Thank you!

Rachel Smith

says:

This is adorable, my little guy would love it!

Megan Dearth

says:

Cute!! Will try this!!

Michelle R

says:

What a fun craft!

joanne

says:

we love hands on activities and craft for learning the alphabet. this looks great!

Laura

says:

What a cute craft! My son is going to love this!

Brittany

says:

I can definitely see my preschooler loving this craft. Thanks for the great idea!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Brittany!

Mara

says:

This is such a neat project for a preschool. :)

Nicole

says:

Thanks for the fun ideas!

Moshe

says:

Great project. Just like all the other ones.

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