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Swatting Phonograms

Swatting Phonograms - All About Learning Press

Phonograms are the building blocks of our language, and if you use the All About Reading or All About Spelling programs, you know that I am a big believer in teaching phonograms to students.

In AAR and AAS, we use phonogram cards and letter tiles to give your child lots of opportunity to learn, review, and practice phonograms.

But if you believe like I do that you can never have too much practice, here’s a great hands-on activity that you can slip in whenever you have a few extra minutes. It’s so much fun your child might not even realize he’s practicing!

Getting Started

Here’s what you’ll need to create your very own phonogram swatter:

Swatter Instructions

Cut around the “splat” graphic, leaving enough white space to completely cover the head of your swatter. Affix the splat to the head of the swatter with two pieces of clear contact paper, one on the front and one on the back. Trim the excess contact paper, leaving about ½” of contact paper around the edges. Now you’re ready to start swatting phonograms.

Swatting Phonograms

Arrange a selection of phonogram cards, letter tiles, or refrigerator magnets on the floor or table top. Select phonograms that your child is currently working on or needs extra practice with.

Swatting Phonograms - All About Learning Press

Say the name and/or sound of a phonogram and have your child “swat” that phonogram with his swatter. Keep going until all the phonograms have been swatted. Repeat any phonograms that your child had trouble with.

Swatting Phonograms - All About Learning Press

More Fun with Your Swatter

There is no limit to the fun that you can have with your swatter. Here are a few more ideas:

  • Scatter your phonogram cards around a large room. Say the names and let your child run around the room to find and swat the phonograms. Turn up the fun a notch by timing each attempt!
  • Lay out a collection of word cards that all contain a particular phonogram. Have your child swat the word cards as you say the words.
  • If you don’t have phonogram cards, word cards, or letter tiles, that’s okay! Use alphabet flash cards or create your own activity by writing letters, phonograms, or words on 3×5 cards for your child to “swat.”
  • Reverse roles. Let your child dictate the names/sounds of the phonogram cards or the word cards while you swat them.
Swatting Phonograms - All About Learning PressSwatting Phonograms - All About Learning Press

Can you think of more fun ways to use your swatter? Leave a comment!

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Leave a Comment

Kim

says:

Thanks for sharing these downloads.

Kendra Waind

says:

We review key cards with the swatter too! I have a list of answers that we put on the board and I’ll ask the key card questions. The students have a race to see who can swat the answer first. It’s so fun! For ex. I will ask when do we use /j/ three letter /j/ (dge) and they have to swat “right after a short vowel.”

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kendra,
Oh, what a great active idea! Thank you for sharing it.

whenita

says:

thank about it. it help our students.

Tracy

says:

What a fun idea! We are definitely going to try this. My son moans about review cards but he loves to smack a flyswatter!

Beth

says:

What a fun way to review! Easy to put together, easy to use, and what child doesn’t enjoy smacking a fly swatter?

Ingrid

says:

Very great activity for reading phonograms . It can be used to reinforce many other reading skills.

Renae

says:

What a fun phonogram activity! I love the hands on component that helps with hand eye coordination. You’re being featured as part of a Phonogram Activity Round Up at Every Star Is Different!

Merry

says:

Thanks Renae, great post!

Cathy

says:

Use with High frequency words to help kids learn them automatically … read the word – heve the splat the correct word … later read a story and have them splat the words they hear in the story … this would be very easy to adjust to different learning levels.

Thanks for the ideas!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Good ideas for using the Swatter, Cathy! Thanks for sharing!

Ingrid

says:

they can say “swat” as they hear the words being read in the story.

Cathy

says:

Thank you for this idea! I love it! I have some first grade intervention students who can’t remember sight words. This will be a great activity for them.

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