160

How to Avoid the “Curse of Knowledge” as You Teach

Scientist is teaching with 'the curse of knowledge'

Have you ever noticed that when you know a lot about a subject, it can actually be harder to teach someone else about it?

This is a common problem, and it’s called the curse of knowledge. The curse refers to the idea that the more you know about a subject, the harder it can be to transfer that knowledge to someone who has limited knowledge of the subject.1

For instance, a brilliant physicist who studies atomic collisions may have a difficult time trying to explain basic atoms and molecules to a high school student.

Here’s an example that might hit closer to home …

Your Aunt Sally knows how to bake the perfect pie crust. In fact, she’s done it so often she doesn’t even need a recipe. She just does it by feel. If you ask her to teach you, she’ll probably say something like, “Just keep adding water until it feels right” or “Knead the dough until it’s the perfect consistency.”

Not very helpful, is it?

pie baking and the curse of knowledge

As delicious as Aunt Sally’s pies are, she’s suffering from the curse of knowledge. Her knowledge may help her make a great pie, but it has become a curse to the process of teaching you to make a great pie. Sadly, if she can’t learn to overcome the curse of knowledge, the art of the perfect pie crust may never move beyond Aunt Sally’s kitchen.

But the curse of knowledge isn’t just Aunt Sally’s problem. It may be your problem as well.

Why It’s Critical to Defeat the Curse of Knowledge

As you know, teaching your child to read and spell is one of the most important jobs you will ever do. But if you don’t overcome the curse of knowledge, you may encounter all kinds of obstacles:

  • You may find it hard to have patience with your child, often wondering, “Why aren’t you getting this?
  • You may underestimate the difficulties your child is having.
  • You might expect your child to make larger leaps in understanding than she is capable of.
  • You might be tempted to skip lessons because they seem too easy, without realizing that the skipped lessons contain information that is necessary for complete understanding.
Puzzle pieces

The curse of knowledge can affect your effectiveness as a teacher by causing you to forget that your child doesn’t have the benefit of the knowledge that you possess.

Imagine that your child is trying to fit the pieces of a big puzzle together without the benefit of the picture on the front of the puzzle box. He doesn’t know what the end result is supposed to look like. He doesn’t know how to fit the pieces together. Without the guidance of someone who has the big picture in mind, your child can struggle and become frustrated.

5 Ways to Move Beyond the Curse of Knowledge

Just understanding that the curse of knowledge exists is an important first step! It helps you recognize potential problems before they actually become problems. Here are five important tips to help you avoid the pitfalls created by the curse of knowledge.

  1. Empathize with your child. Remember that learning can be hard work! Be encouraging during the teaching/learning process.
  2. Don’t assume. Always try to keep in mind the many things your child doesn’t know, being careful not to assume your child knows something automatically.
  3. Take things as slowly as you need to. Don’t try to teach too much new information in a short period of time. Respect your child’s funnel.
  4. Break down tasks. Teach each skill separately, and then combine the new skill with previously learned skills.
  5. Take an inventory of every skill that needs to be taught. Address all areas of need so that there will be no gaps in your child’s understanding of the subject.

Of course, this is all more easily said than done!

But that’s where comprehensive programs such as All About Reading and All About Spelling come in. They eliminate the effect that the curse of knowledge may have on your instruction. Since everything is carefully laid out, you won’t have to reach back into the dark recesses of your brain to remember what it took to become a good reader. You won’t have to figure out how to help your child put all those random puzzle pieces together. The programs do that for you. You can just sit back and enjoy the process with your child.

Has the curse of knowledge ever affected your teaching?

___________________________________
1Heath, C., & Heath, D. (2010). Made to stick: Why some ideas survive and others die. New York: Random House.

< Previous Post  Next Post >

Leave a Comment

Nynke

says:

Very recognizable! I want to remember to be more patient with my daughter as she learns to read.

angela peppers

says:

very thought provoking post. i’m going to be examining my teaching style and looking at my daughters learning in a whole new way.

Merry

says: Customer Service

The best teachers keep learning; good for you, Angela! I hope the post is helpful as you rethink your style. Have fun with your girls!

Heidi

says:

We LOVE All About Learning products. One of my favorite things being able to call and ask questions or talk through ideas for teaching. Thank you!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Heidi!

Jamee Mascia

says:

Hoping AAR will help me overcome this.

This is an amazing article. That is a very common problem that parents face. I suspect that our expectations are just a bit too high. Thank you for the recommendations on how to help curb that problem. I will definitely try it and share with my colleagues.

Julie

says:

Exactly something I struggle with. AAR definitely helps with this!

Sally

says:

Nicely written and timely reminder.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Sally.

M K McAnulty

says:

Unfortunately the curse of knowledge certainly has affected my teaching.

Caryn Gillette

says:

This is such a great reminder! It will really help to curb my frustration in schooling with my younger kids. Thank you!

Billie

says:

I just found your website today and I am so excited to use it and to share it! There is so much helpful information here, especially for a beginning homeschool mom like myself! Thank you so much for all the work you have done to make my work a little easier!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Billie,
How exciting to be beginning homeschool! If you have any questions, just ask, even if they aren’t specifically about All About Spelling or All About Reading.

Linda

says:

“Respect your child’s funnel.” Good way to think in regards to each child’s ability to process! Thanks for the tips!

Nicole Little

says:

Very helpful! Thank you

Kari W

says:

Helpful info!

Bree

says:

I once worked at a tutoring center, and during the interview I was asked about a time I had a hard time in school. They wanted to make sure the tutors could relate to difficulties of the students, even if the tutor is very knowledgeable about the subject.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Bree,
What a great interview question for anyone that will be teaching!

Yvette Gomez

says:

Very insightful, especially for my son who struggles with reading.

Andrea

says:

Yes it has affected some teaching. I graduated from culinary school and owned a bakery. So just like in the article some things I have learned by feel or taste. It’s tough to go back and then teach. Good tips

Stephanie B

says:

I have such a hard time with this. Especially with subjects that came easy to me as a child. These are some great ways to help avoid this issue

Kendra

says:

This was a good reminder to embrace my role as the teacher rather than the student who has already mastered the skill. Too often I forget that the things I know where not learned in a single year, but over the course of many years, grades, and teachers.

Amelia

says:

It seems especially hard when it’s a topic I really love, I get all excited and just want to teach everything all at once, and I want them to be as excited about it as me.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amelia,
I very much understand! I find it helpful to remind myself that so much of learning is relearning on a deeper level. For example, in kindergarten, you grow bean plants and, in high school, you learn about cotyledons and photosynthesis. If I remember that they will get the information again, I find it easier to stop myself at the right amount of information for them now.

Crystal

says:

The curse of knowledge has definitely interfered with my teaching my children. Sometimes I think it’s better for us to learn it together.

Dixie Parriman

says:

Thank you! This is a great reminder.

Cassi Matthews

says:

Thank you for sharing this article. I must admit I’ve been guilty of this very thing and didn’t realize it had a name, The Curse of Knowledge. I’m grateful for the wisdom you give to help me in my journey as a homeschool mom.

Stacy

says:

This article is so good that I have to share it out with everyone I know! It’s very easy for us teachers and parents to fall into this curse of knowledge without us knowing. Thank you for this!

Mistie

says:

I think this might be kind of the same thing…because I have worked as a classroom teacher many years prior to homeschooling, I had to unlearn a lot of things. I felt like a lot of the “classroom” knowledge mentality was a curse – it hurt the way I homeschooled. Always room to learn and adjust, right :)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Mistie,
I have a couple of friends that were classroom teachers for years before becoming homeschool parents, and both say the same thing. I’m not sure it’s the curse of knowledge so much as it is that one-on-one teaching is simply different than classroom teaching. Many of the skills are the same, but enough are different than it can be an adjustment.

There is always something new to learn! That’s one of the best parts of life!

Rachel Horsting

says:

I have struggled with this teaching both reading and elementary math. I was an early spontaneous reader, so I don’t even have memories of how I was taught. I’m having fun systematically learning the rules and logic behind reading and spelling as I teach it to my kids.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I know what you mean, Rachel. I have memories of my mom showing me some basic sounds with Cat in the Hat, but then the next thing I remember is reading everything in sight. I love that we can learn all the details of reading and spelling through teaching our own children!

Dyanna

says:

I am sometimes amazed at the things my kids don’t know. I think to myself, “How did you miss this?” I am very appreciative of programs like yours that fill in all the gaps.

Deborah

says:

Oh my! I was just talking about this. I started reading at 4 and it was EASY. Now I have an 8 1/2 year old struggling with cvc words. I have to remind myself daily to be patient and take things at his place.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great attitude, Deborah. Please let me know if you have any questions or need anything.

Erin

says:

This is a great reminder to be patient and understanding when teaching young learners. It is easy to forget how hard it can be to learn new skills for our kids.

G. C.

says:

I can see now why administrators who support Common Core, especially in early elementary, have forgotten the importance of pre-skills for better learning in kindergarten. They want students to read earlier and to write sentences, but fail to see how exposing young children to songs, finger plays and other oral language activities as well as fine motor activities are important building blocks for skills later on. With increased knowledge, I believe how they do forget the basics that are so important. Thanks for illustrating this important point when teaching! I have begun to write down what has worked in my early years of teaching, so that as the years go by, it will be easy to stick with the basics, even with the plethora of information on the web, that seems to excite me to try new things. New is not necessarily always better!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

G.C.,
Sometimes the old ways that have worked in the past really are the best ways. New can be better, but not always!

Christina Olson

says:

This is a great article! I see knowledgeable people frequently unable to teach. Thank you for the pointers!

Suzette

says:

I really need to buy this program. My son,12, really struggles with reading.

Ana B.

says:

Great article! I have a kindergartener that is learning to read and I can’t wait to try AAR… I’ve heard so many great things about this program…

Heather

says:

Good reminders

auschick

says:

I’m always amazed at what my daughter struggles with when to me it seems to basic! Learning so much on this journey!

Andi Thomas

says:

AAR has been a great tool to make sure we get in short segments of learning as well as fill in gaps that my older student as missed.

Jaci

says:

Very interesting! A lot of good things to consider! Thanks :)

Sherry

says:

Just another reason that I love All About Learning products! Your teacher manuals show us exactly the right amount of information needed for each lesson! Thank you so much for this great product!

Julie Cunningham

says:

This is great information! I’m going to have to think it through and see where this is hindering my teaching.

Olivia

says:

Scripted lessons help so much with this issue. The author Marie Rippell has thought so carefully about what needs to be taught about each new concept that, as long as I follow the script and don’t skip any lessons, the curse of knowledge is unlikely to affect my reading instruction. Thanks, Marie!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I agree, Olivia! 😊

I wholly understand this when dealing with my second daughter who struggles more with reading. I don’t want to “jump ahead” or even move on when a concept seems simple to me because she might not have gotten it yet. Sometimes repeating something is good for her!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

This is a great way to approach teaching, Nicole! Thanks for sharing it.

Susan

says:

Assumptions will always get us in trouble.

Rebecca

says:

Our first child learned to read very well, with a heavy load of diligence and drilling. Our second child, not so much. The program just simply didn’t work for her. But in addition, this came into play as well. I have always loved reading and expected her lessons to be a bit easier (since I had already taught it once). While she is currently “at grade level”, I want her to learn to enjoy reading. This is where, I hope, your program will come into play and help. I also plan to use it with our third child, just to streamline things a bit.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rebecca,
All About Reading does a wonderful job of teaching students to enjoy reading!

Let me know if you have any question or need anything as you begin.

Keri Scrivines

says:

Spelling came easy for me, so having a child who has trouble spelling has been challenging. Patience is key. All About Learning has definitely made an impact for the better with her studies!

Deborah Bown

says:

All the products look great!

Meagan Ramer

says:

I hadn’t considered this! I think I have done a pretty good job at being understanding and patient with my child that is learning to read.
We have really loved the All About Reading program!

Jennifer Tilleman

says:

I agree with your thoughts. I can be guilty of doing this sometimes. I love that your program can help eliminate that

tshokee

says:

thank you so much for letting us know how to improve and the way as a parent need to follow…

Carol

says:

I like it! You are so right. Because we know it so well, we lose patience with our children. But, we don’t realize how long we took to learn things. It, too, was not as easy when we were a child.
Carol

Laura

says:

I have been so grateful I chose to start with Pre-Reading even though my daughter knows her alphabet because she’s learning word skills I wouldn’t have thought to teach!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Laura,
The Pre-reading level covers all the Reading Readiness Skills so little ones have the best start at reading!

Jenn

says:

Thanks for this helpful, thought provoking article!

Josie Ladle

says:

This is so true. I definitely need to take this into account as I try to determine what my child needs to know!

Jen Jackson

says:

A lot of good information in this blog. It is a good reminder we all should keep learning>

Leah

says:

Great info!

Cassie Weaver

says:

Wow!!! I will definitely use this in my classroom!

Carrie

says:

Great advice!!

Nicole

says:

This is such a good reminder for me! Learning IS hard! It is also an encouragement to be reminded that I’m not the only one who forgets that.

Ana

says:

Excellent article. Must keep it in mind as I tend to lose my patience often.

Gaps in learning must be identified so targeted instruction can be provided! Great article!

Heather

says:

I was just struggling with this at VBS last week. I was working in the crafts area & found myself struggling to find a different way to explain something that we were doing in a way this particular child could understand. I had been practicing on this projects for weeks & had a certain way of describing it but it just wasn’t making sense to him. This is a very small scale example but I can definitely see how it could affect other areas I teach.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great example, Heather!

Kathy Hoben

says:

My problem is often deciding between ways of teaching things. There are so many methods and not every one is a good fit for a particular child.

Kelly Fox

says:

This post is applicable well beyond the early years of teaching reading and writing as you so well point out. People who have struggled to master a concept become it’s best teachers. It’s definitely counterintuitive, but so true.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kelly,
I have seen the same trend! Those that always found a subject easy tend to have trouble teaching it, while those that had trouble learning it tend to be able to explain it to others more easily. It’s because the curse of knowledge isn’t as strong for those that remember the struggle.

Pauline

says:

I need to remember this when I teach handwriting! It seems so easy to me that I forget how hard it can be when you are just starting out. Good to keep in mind for any subject!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Pauline,
I once attended a teach-the-teacher homeschool class that asked us to try hand copying out a passage from a language we don’t know. It was so surprising hard! Writing a language that doesn’t use our alphabet felt more like art assignment than language. That activity has stuck with me, reminding me that things I take for granted as easy can be very difficult for new learners.

Jen

says:

I’ve had to learn to relax and just follow the plan. It’s been hard, but after 12 years I’m starting to chill out a little!!

Julie Smith

says:

This is a great reminder for me and it can be applied to any subject. Thank you!

Charissa

says:

This is a great reminder of the kind of patience and systematic teaching style that really helps my child.

Charissa

says:

This post is a great reminder of the kind of patience and help my child needs!

Beth S.

says:

I find myself with this curse when teaching math. It is a good reminder to make sure I teach all lessons.

Deb Dell

says:

This is a great reminder! I’m so glad we found AAR and AAS to help with this…it’s very thorough and we love it!

Paige

says:

Thank you for giving permission to slow down and take a slower pace, rather than be driven by the need to finish a certain number of lessons in a certain timeframe!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Paige. Going at your child’s own unique pace to ensure they have a firm foundation in their learning will lead to better progress in the long run!

Adra

says:

Excited to start AAR with my youngest this year!

Julie

says:

This is a good reminder!

Deniece

says:

Great reminders. Sometimes it is easy to get frustrated.

Tulisha

says:

When I saw the title of this post, I figured I already had a good idea what it was talking about. I taught Latin for 5 years. I had to be careful not to overwhelm my students with extraneous information (even if I found it relevant and fascinating). But I appreciate the reminder here for patience. I haven’t taught reading yet; I imagine that it would be easy for me to take certain concepts for granted and then get frustrated if those concepts don’t click for my child. I’ve looked through AAR’d sample pages; I’m excited about how clearly and concisely concepts are broken down and how thoroughly all the concepts are covered.

Jennifer Page

says:

Thank God for AAR!

Mark Hester

says:

Thank you for putting a name to this frustration. First, I am math and science oriented and none of our three children are. Teaching math over the years has been a struggle for them and me. My youngest child has dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia. My wife and I like to read and write. Prior to my child’s diagnosis, we just couldn’t understand why she couldn’t/wouldn’t read. That is still hard. The worse thing, though, is with math. It is a wonderful world of ‘wows’ and my daughter struggles even with simple addition. I think the Curse of Knowledge goes along well with discovering the teaching style your child needs and adjusting your own expectations to meet your child where they are. Thanks again!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Mark,
You’re welcome. I understand the frustration with loving math and having children that struggle with it. Meeting your children where they are is definitely the most important thing!

Donna Perry

says:

Great points to consider. Thank you!

JoAnna

says:

Helpful reminders to consider. Thank you!

Amy DelaTerre

says:

Yes, it has when I’ve taught math. Assuming my son would remember things he’d been taught without a lot of review, for example, was a mistake! I love AAR and AAS, and wish I could find a math curriculum as well done.

Emily

says:

Great tips. Thank you!

Karen

says:

This makes me feel better about when I struggle to explain simple STEM concepts to lay people even though I am an engineer!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Karen,
Yes! After years of me struggling with the curse of knowledge in teaching my son, he is now struggling with it when explaining his class projects to me. He is in his 3rd year of engineering school. 😉

Amanda Mihin

says:

I worry that I fall prey to this. I generally start by saying the technically correct version and then work to explain what that means in easier terms.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

That’s a great approach, Amanda! It allows your children to be exposed to the more technical vocabulary and ideas while still understanding the concepts on their level.

Stephanie

says:

This is such a good reminder! Thank you 😄

Candous Langston

says:

These tips are awesome! Love our AAR and AAS! This approach has been exactly what we needed! Not to mention, my kids love the fun games in the activity book.

Nicole Gershfeld

says:

Thank you for programs that are so easy to follow- and I don’t have to even know too much more than how to read the script after gathering the materials. Sometimes we take breaks from consistently doing the lessons and I’m always so surprised how well the info has stuck and how easy it is for me to just open the teachers manual up to the last lesson we did after running through all the cards as a review.
Please create an app to do away with the review box. As much as we love it and as helpful as is, the app for the letter tiles makes me really wish for a virtual review box. (I have multiple children in different levels of both aaa and aar, so lots of little boxes.)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Nicole,
I like the idea for an app for review boxes; I’ll pass that suggestion right along to our app development team! Thank you.

Megan

says:

Good reminder. I’m constantly evaluating what I’ve just said and redefining some of my words to my kiddos.

Peggy Austin

says:

This sounds like it is exactly what I have been looking for. I absolutely love the multi sensory approach to this reading program.

Sarah

says:

Great point! Never heard of this “curse” but so true. It happens!

Alissa Piland

says:

Oh man, this is one of my hardest things to deal with right now. Thanks for the advice!

Mark Treinen

says:

I’m glad to see this topic come up. I have caught myself occasionally in the “curse of knowledge”. Daily I have to remember not to assume. Thanks for this.

Donald Knight

says:

Interesting and useful article.

Melissa Shears

says:

Great tips! I’ll definitely review them in my homeschool teaching. Thanks!

Tammy J

says:

I love how quick and straightforward each lesson is.

Cassandra Harmon

says:

I can’t believe the material I have been looking for is right here. So excited!!

Molly

says:

Thank you for this post!! So important for us to keep in mind. This is something I struggle with during schoolwork and chores.

Christy

says:

I run into this all the time. Sometimes with school work but more often during chores. So much more is involved in training kids than I realize!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Christy,
Yes, chores and other physical work sometimes gets overlooked in teaching! We just think, “Here’s the broom, sweep.” But a broom is a really awkward tool if you don’t know how to use it. There is so much teaching require, so much learning needed, in all areas of life!

Michelle

says:

Thank you for this very important reminder!
I’ve definetely had times when I’ve assumed my children all understand something taught. I have to continually remind myself that each one of them process things differently and at different speeds. Glad to have read this blog, very helpful!

Kristy

says:

This is really good advice

Hollie

says:

I have this curse! My nephew is ten and my daughter is six and she seems like she reads better; I’ve found myself asking why he isn’t getting it! Or this one: What am I doing wrong?

I definitely need to purchase AAR and AAS!

Jenn J.

says:

This is a great reminder to keep it simple. There’s a time and a place to go into more detail later.

Angela

says:

I find it can be a challenge sometimes when children ask a question to find the appropriate way to answer it for them – to sift through all I know about a topic to give the simple answer in a way that will give them the information or explanation they need.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

It is a challenge, Angela! You could feel a chapter from a college textbook on why the sky is blue, but when a preschooler asks you want to give a truthful answer yet be simple enough to understand. But it is okay to take your time when answering a child. I think they respect that you are thinking through your answer.

Kristi

says:

Good advice, this will help us in our search for quality curriculum in other subject areas like math and science.

Kelly Kallas

says:

I love this!

Kristin Owen

says:

When it comes to knitting, I feel cursed by my mother’s curse of knowledge about it!

I have not been able to learn from her how to knit; she models and then when I get stuck says: “C’mon, it’s easy!”

Um … not easy if you don’t know how!

Whatever we have not already learned, whether it is quantum physics or the sound of a letter, it is likely to be difficult!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kristin,
I know what you mean about knitting! I finally had success in learning to knit, and getting to the “it’s easy!” point, by using a how-to knit book written for children! Since it was written for children, the author wrote in a way that assumed the reader new absolutely nothing. That is what made all the difference.

Molly

says:

Ok, this explains a few things I’ve been encountering. Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Molly,
I felt the same way the first time I heard about the curse of knowledge! It is really helpful to be aware of it while teaching.

Anne Devermann

says:

As a classroom teacher at the beginning Ievel I have encountered the problems you listed but never heard them addressed this way. Very helpful!

Qin

says:

Good advice!

Janice Schreiber-Poznik

says:

I researched multi-sensory Orton Gillingham curricula specifically for two very challenged 2nd grade students. I really love the Level 2 materials and my students are enjoying the stories. The illustrations are appealing as well. Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Janice! 😊

Rachel

says:

Thank you!! I feel the pressure from this often and had never put my finger on exactly what was causing my difficulty!

Julie

says:

Great advice!

Pam S

says:

Such good insight here! Thank you!

Sister Mary Peter, M.I.C.M.

says:

This is a really important point. Thank you for breaking the concept down so thoroughly.

Tina Price

says:

This makes sense as to why I enjoy teaching the subjects I learn along with them! Thanks so much for the insight :-)

Deborah Diane Perry

says:

I am a reading intervention teacher and I continually break things down for my students to help them take bite sized chunks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Deborah,
After learning about the curse of knowledge, I have observed time and again that the best teachers aren’t the most knowledgeable or the most “fun”, but rather the ones that do the work to break things down for children. You sound like one of those best teachers!

Robin

says:

This is so true.

Cara

says:

Thank you for this article it will help going forward teaching my 5 year old to read.

Brittany

says:

Thank you! This article was really insightful!

Alicia

says:

Thank you, great article!

Shelley Kinder

says:

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you for this article. I have been here with my youngest daughter. My older two children learned to read and spell while they were in public school. When my third child came along 12 years later I was at a total loss at how to teach her to read or spell. This article explains why I was having such a problem. I am getting excited to be able to teach her to read and spell!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Shelley,
I’m glad to hear this article was helpful to you. I know it really opened my eyes on things when I first heard about the concept of the curse of knowledge.

Let us know if we can help or if you have any questions.

Heather Pelletier

says:

I’m afraid that I will have to be mindful of this as I teach our LO. It was different helping our oldest with his homework versus being the actual “teacher”. I do believe that my oldest learned to read quicker by helping him sound things out rather than just telling him what the word was. I will do the same with LO.

Colleen Campbell

says:

Very helpful, even with a background in education!

Anna

says:

Grammar for English Language Learner– where to start?

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Anna,

Here are some resources that might help you with learning English as a second language:

http://www.englishclub.com/esl-forums/index.php–This site is set up specifically for practicing English and answering questions.

http://www.rachelsenglish.com–great resource for ESL students and teachers; over 300 videos on pronunciation, lessons and so on.

http://www.elementalenglish.com–has videos with English lessons.

Rosie

says:

Great Article. Thanks for painting this clearly.

Vanessa

says:

Timely reminder!! Thank you very much!!!

Cristen

says:

I love AAR and AAS!

Lisa Marshall

says:

This is so true. Unfortunately I have had this issue one to many times.

Annette

says:

I needed to be reminded of this and am so grateful that your programs are written in such a way that we cover every step of the process…it truly is step by step!

Aaron Schofield

says:

We frequently have to remind ourselves that our kids are just acting their ages. Sometimes our expectations are unreasonable, but often they are even impossible. Even between the kids, they have irrational expectations of each other’s knowledge and abilities. We really struggle to remember that they lack our knowledge and experience. Teaching the kids to remember that their younger siblings are still learning, whether about matching their clothes, sharing, or math, helps us remember as well.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

These are some good reminders, Aaron! Thanks!

Leave a Comment