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Phonogram Jungle Bingo – A Fun Review Activity

Practicing phonograms is a lot more fun when you have jungle-themed Bingo boards! Help your child review (and master!) phonograms with the help of monkeys, lions, and other exotic inhabitants. But be careful–it’s a jungle out there!

download phonogram jungle bingo

Preparing Your “Phonogram Jungle Bingo” Game

  1. Download and print as many game boards as you need for your children.
  2. Gather the Phonogram Cards each child needs to review from his or her Reading or Spelling Review Box. (Boards have either 8 or 15 spaces.)
  3. Write the child’s phonograms in the blank spaces on his or her game board.
    Optional: For repeated use, laminate your game boards and use an erasable marker to write the phonograms on the cards.
  4. Gather 15-20 game markers (popcorn, raisins, mini marshmallows, or Bingo chips) for each player.
child writes phonograms on jungle bingo card

Playing “Phonogram Jungle Bingo”

Have your child place one of his or her game markers on the “free” space.

child places a marker on jungle bingo card

Dictate a sound and encourage your child to search the game board to locate the phonogram that makes that sound.

children play phonogram jungle bingo

When your child locates the phonogram, he or she should place a marker on that space.

boy places a marker on phonogram jungle bingo card

Continue dictating phonograms until each child completes a row (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) on his or her game board and yells BINGO!

children playing phonogram jungle bingo

For a fun variation, let your child be the bingo caller, using the phonogram cards to dictate the sounds while you play the game.

What’s your favorite way to review phonograms? Let me know in the comments below!


Photos by: Rachel Neumann

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Big Spins

says:

This article is really nice. The advice which you shared for a child that how they play and I really like the way of your explanation.
NIce… Keep going……

Becky Bratt

says:

So cute! I will have to try this with my daughter – thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Becky! I hope she has a lot of fun with it. 😊

Becky B.

says:

This is so cute! I will have to give this a try with my daughter.

David Inman

says:

Phonogram Jungle Bingo seems pretty amazing and fun game for kids to play along with learning. I will definitely try this game with my students. I also have some other activities for students to learn and play simultaneously. Thanks for this idea!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, David! I hope your students have a lot of fun with this activity.

Beth C

says:

Fun idea! Thanks!

Gretchen

says:

Great way to review without the drill and kill!!!

Hannah

says:

This looks like such a fun way to learn! Thanks!

Julie

says:

Thank you for making creative ways to learn how to decode words.

Sherry

says:

This seems like such a fun way to review phonograms. My little guy is in 1st grade and the sounds app helped him learn the site word eight. His teacher recommended your site. I love your program and tips.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sherry,
The word “eight” is easy once you know the phonogram EIGH! I love that the Phonogram Sounds app helped him to learn it. 😊

Shannon Snyder

says:

Thanks!

Chrissy

says:

So happy I found this site! Lots of great resources!
My friend bought this reading kit (I’l try to attach link below) that teaches to read without site words. Pretty much says NOT to teach site words! Anyone ever heard of it? Is this a new approach? I have a 4 yo thats a little behind (she’s my third and didn’t get much of my time) and Im trying to get her up to par for Kindergarten.
Thanks in Advance for any input. I’d like to buy it to help her out…

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Chrissy! Learning without sight words is not new. In English 97% of words are actually decodable–here’s more information on Helping Kids Sound Out Words.

I know what you mean about the younger ones not getting as much undivided attention! Have fun with your 4 year-old! She’s so young yet, I wouldn’t worry. She’ll get there when she’s ready.

VM Mills

says:

Such a great idea! Can’t wait to try this with my kids! Thanks, AALP for sharing this resource :)

Fam Gomez

says:

Thank you for this game, my children enjoy bingo and now they can learn even more while playing, :)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Fam! I hope your child has a great time with this game.

Alisha

says:

Aw, cute idea! We’ll have to try this.

Esperanza Parks

says:

My little girl is very competitive, games always help “jog her memory” 🙂

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Esperanza,
Games do have a way of encouraging us to work a bit harder, don’t they? 😊

This looks fun and easy to implement.

Teresa Thomasson

says:

This looks like fun will triy this

Azita

says:

I have not yet taught phonograms to my son, thank you for this idea!

Cristina

says:

Very cool, thanks!

Nancy Ball

says:

I love all the fun things you incorporate I to the lessons.

Mi Ara

says:

Thanks for sharing. This is such a fun way to review phonograms!

Sarah

says:

My daughter is going to love this!

Nicole

says:

Great idea! I’ll be using this with my students!

Renee Smith

says:

As a private tutor I’m always looking for quality materials to help my students. The All About Reading and the All About Spelling programs have been invaluable for me and my students. Can’t have too many resources!!

Merry

says: Customer Service

Thanks, Renee! I’m so glad the programs are helping your students. Enjoy the game!

Sangeetha

says:

My daughter has been having trouble with “sh” and “ch” sounds. She sometimes gets gets confused with the two. This looks like a fun way to get her to practice these phonograms.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sangeetha,
This game is a great way to review tricky phonograms!

However, here is a tip for helping your daughter master these consonant teams. Draw a snake in the shape of an S (no need for good drawings, just to give your daughter the idea). Tell your daughter that snakes make “/sh/” sounds as they slither through the grass. For CH, draw or show a profile picture pointing to your daughter’s left (so that the chin looks like the letter C), and draw a C right around the chin. Point to the chin with the C and say “/ch/-chin,” showing that a chin is in the shape of a C and chin starts with the /ch/ sound.

Hopefully the review game and these memory tips will clear up this issue for your daughter, but if it continues to be a problem let me know.

Kandi

says:

Excited to try this game.

Sheila

says:

We use “All About Spelling” and love it! The games you provide keep it fun! Thanks for all you do!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Shelia! 😊

Renee

says:

Very fun! My kids LOVE these types of games!

Delina

says:

My son loves games, will have to go e it a try!

Rachel Cacciamani

says:

I’m always looking for fun things like this to spice up our daily learning.

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