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11 Great Ways to Review Reading Word Cards

8 Great Ways to Review Reading Word Cards - All About Reading

Let’s face it. Daily review can be, well … boring. But regular review is one of the most important factors in retaining and recalling previously taught material. That’s why daily review of the Word Cards in All About Reading helps children master what they’re learning—permanently.

If reviewing the Word Cards has become a chore for you and your child, you have full permission to get creative and make them fun again! Practice sessions can become another part of the lessons that your child looks forward to.

The activities below are specifically geared toward use with All About Reading Word Cards, but if you’re looking for ideas for reviewing spelling words, check out 8 Great Ways to Review Spelling Word Cards as well!

11 Great Ways to Review Reading Word Cards!

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Create a Life-Sized Game Board

Make a big circle on the floor with a pile of upside-down Word Cards. Each player throws a pair of dice and moves that number of spaces around the circle, counting each card as he steps on it. If the player can read the card he stops on, he keeps the card. If he can’t read it, he puts the card back. Keep rolling the dice and moving around the circle until all the cards have been collected. (Shared by Pam B. at Ed Snapshots.)

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Get Moving!

For this game you’ll need an exercise ball and a long hallway. Put a pile of Word Cards upside-down at the far end of the hallway. When you say go, have your child roll down the hall, pick up a card, and try to read it. If he reads it correctly, he runs back to the starting position with the ball and the card. If he can’t read the card, he must put it back in the pile. Continue the game until your child has correctly read all the words.

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Build a Word Card City

Create a city in your living room by arranging the Word Cards face down on the floor and furniture so that every Word Card is a building. Have your child drive around the city, reading the word as he arrives at each building. If he reads a word correctly, turn that card face up. The game continues until all the cards have been turned face up.

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Make Your Words Go KABOOM!

Write the word BOOM on several blank Word Cards. Mix up all your Word Cards and scatter them face down in a pile on the table. Players take turns selecting and reading cards from the pile. If a player reads a card correctly, he keeps the card. If he misses a card, he puts it back in the pile. If a player picks up a BOOM card, he has to return all his cards to the pile. Play continues until all the cards have been collected. (Shared by Pam B. at Ed Snapshots.)

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Get Some Exercise

Place one or two Word Cards face up on each step of your staircase. Have your child stand at the bottom of the staircase. Say a word aloud and have your child hop up the stairs until he locates the matching Word Card. Have your child read the word. If he has found the correct card, he keeps the card. If it’s the wrong card, he leaves it on the step. Play continues until all the Word Cards have been found.

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Enjoy Some “Color-By-Word” Fun

Find a coloring book with big pictures that have large coloring spaces. Write the day’s Word Card words in the spaces. Point to a word (or give oral instructions for finding the word, such as “find the word in the grass”) and have your child read it. If the word is read correctly, the child colors in the space. Keep playing until all the words have been read and the entire picture has been colored.

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Bounce a Beach Ball

Write each of your review words on a plastic beach ball using a dry erase marker. Toss the beach ball back and forth. When your child catches the ball, have him read the word his hand is closest to. If he reads it correctly, erase the word. Play continues until all the words have been erased. (Shared by Marlo R. on Facebook.)

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Go On an Adventure

Use your Word Cards to create your own amazing adventure. You’ll have to use your imagination for this one! Here’s the adventure that Harrison created:

The evil Nightmare Moon has captured sweet Twilight and Rainbow Dash! Now Harrison must traverse the treacherous Word Road in order to save them! Can he read the words and thwart the frightful filly, or will his pony friends be in perpetual peril?(Shared by Emily W. on Instagram.)

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Read Word Cards—with a “Twist”!

This one is a ton of fun—for teacher and student! Place Word Cards in various circles of a Twister game mat. Play the game as usual, but with a “twist”. Before your child can claim a space, he has to correctly read the card on the spot. It’s reading practice and P.E. all at the same time! (Shared by Shawna at Not the Former Things.)

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Pop Some Bubble Wrap

This one is bound to be a favorite! Place a large piece of bubble wrap on the floor and place Word Cards in rows on the bubble wrap. Have your child read the words. Once he has read a word correctly he gets to stomp on the card. Then the bubble wrap does what bubble wrap does. Hey…it’s bubble wrap. What’s not to love? (Shared by Shawna at Not the Former Things.)

8 Great Ways to Review Word Cards - All About Learning Press

Achieve New Heights!

This super fun idea came from a 7-year old fan! Do you have a balcony? Or maybe a second story window? I hope you’re not afraid of heights, because you’ll need a high spot for this one. Even standing on a chair or step stool will work. Once you’ve found your high spot, drop the Word Cards, one at a time, and have your child catch the cards as they float down. After he reads the card, drop the next one. (Shared by Melinda B via Facebook.)

Ideas for Reviewing Word Cards, Recommended by Our Readers

  • Play “beat the teacher.” Show flashcards one at a time. If your child knows the word, the card goes in his pile. If he doesn’t know it, it goes in your pile. Whoever finishes with the biggest pile wins. (Recommended by Jill R. via Facebook)
  • Put all your words into a PowerPoint presentation, one word on each slide. The reader is allowed to advance the slide after she reads a word correctly. (Recommended by @szimbelman100 via Instagram)
  • Write the words on a glass door/window in dry erase, and let your child read the words and shoot them with a Nerf gun. (Recommended by Kelly B. via blog comment)
  • Use a favorite board and/or card game to review Word Cards. Before each turn the child has to read one or two of his review Word Cards – to gain an extra turn he can spell a word that he’s mastered. (Recommended by Rachel W. via blog comment)
  • Take groups of Word Cards and hide them around the room. After your child finds a few, have him read them and then hunt for some more! (Recommended by Leah via blog comment)
  • Play tic-tac-toe! I make a 3×3 grid of cards and we take turns reading a card and placing a colored token on it. My son added the rule that reading a “Leap Word” card earns an extra turn. (Recommended by Andrea R. via Facebook)
  • My son likes to fish, so we have used his fake fishing pole (a Swiffer extender rod with rope on the end) or lasso to “catch” flash cards strewn about on the ground. (Recommended by Tara via blog comment)
  • Post Word Cards on a fence and let your child whack them with a foam sword as he reads them correctly. (Recommended by Penny via blog comment)
  • I tape cards all around our fence and have the boys kick a ball towards them. Whichever card they hit, they have to read. We have also adapted this for hockey and basketball. Anything to keep the boys moving! (Recommended by Stacy via blog comment)
  • During warm weather play “word splat.” Write words on the bricks on the side of the house, pick a word and she throws a splat ball or a wet sponge at the word. (Recommended by Marguerite via blog comment)
  • My son likes to play charades using the review Word Cards. (Recommended by Michelle I. via blog comment)
  • Practice reading cards that are hidden around the house. We play “cold or hot” until he finds one. If he reads it correctly then he gets to check it off the master list. Once all are found and he successfully read each one, he gets to pick a fun book for me to read to him or board game to play. (Recommended by Christina via blog comment)
  • My daughter loves stories. So I make up a story as she goes through the Word Cards. I pause for her to read the next Word Card to continue the story, trying not to make it predictable. I just make the stories up on the fly, and it can make for some pretty crazy ones, which she loves! (Recommended by Jennifer via blog comment)

After you practice Word Cards, why not review compound words? Our free downloadable Banana Splits Game offers fun for practice students of all reading levels.

Banana Splits Game

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Leave a Comment

Cara

says:

Thanks so much. I’m off to find a broom handle to make a fishing pole!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Cara,
Have fun!

Tanya

says:

There are a lot of good ideas here! I can’t wait to try them.

Shareen z

says:

Bad guy game-Make a winding road with the word cards mixing in both the “bad guy” cards and other word cards for review. The object of the game is to catch all the bad guys! Put a block or some other object on the bad guy cards so that when your child reads them he can put them in his police car and take them to the station. If he misses the bad guy gets away. The other cards on the board have to be read in order to get to the bad guys. We have also added in number/shape recognition as road blocks that have to be solved before getting to the bad guys. My kid loves it!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

What a fun game, Shareen! Thank you for sharing it. I’m sure many kids would enjoy it.

Debbie

says:

I tape them to our basement wall, I call the word out and my nephew throws the tennis ball at it within a set amount in f time.it. we also switch it up by having him see how many he can say & hit within a set amount of time.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Oooo, reading and aim practice in one! What a fun idea, Debbie. Thank you for sharing it.

Jennifer

says:

My daughter loves stories. So I make up a story as she goes through the word cards. I pause for her to read the next word card to continue the story, trying not to make it predictable. I just make the stories up on the fly, and it can make for some pretty crazy ones, which she loves!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Wow, Jennifer, it sounds like you make it a lot of fun! My daughter loves stories too, but she is pretty much left to make up her own stories with the words.

Amy

says:

Hey, that’s how I got DS through fluency reading for a long time. I created a story on the fly with the words as he read them. It can be sort of exhausting, but it makes the kids way more enthusiastic.

Marguerite

says:

We play several games to review words :)

1) Word Detective – I will write a bunch of words on post its and place them in the hall, going up the stairs, placing some in trickier spots. The words will be on the side with the sticky and a number on the front. Then I have my daughter be a detective and help me find x number of clues. I turn off the hall lights, give her a flashlight and a magnifying glass (and a hat/costume is needed of course) and she goes to find the clues. When she brings them back she has to read them. This will work for spelling if you leave out a letter or have a picture that represents what she needs to spell.

2) We got big dice with clear covers from Oriental Trading company, I write words on papers that will fit into the dice. I also printed off a blank game board I found online. We roll a normal numbered die (though we have recently started using a second OTC die where I put number words into the spots, so she has to read the number word to know how many spaces to move). Then we roll the word die. She reads the word if she gets it correct she moves forward, if wrong she moves backwards.

3) We play “word go fish” same as normal go fish except with word cards I make

4) Word Bingo

5) During warmer weather we play word splat. I write words on the bricks on the side of the house, pick a word and she throws a splat ball or a wet sponge at the word.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Marguerite,
These are GREAT ideas! I particularly love the Word Detective one. So creative, and so fun! Thank you for sharing.

Michelle Icenhour

says:

My son likes to play charades using the review cards.

We also lay about 20 cards face down on the ground. We take turns flipping frogs onto the cards. We read the card the frog lands on.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
That flipping frog game sounds like so much fun!

Kimberly

says:

THIS is what I need! My boys love their AAR & AAS lessons, but my 5yr old especially hates going through the huge stack of flash cards. We do laps or stairs or jumping jacks (which he loves) after every couple cards or say silly things when he reads certain words we associate with other things (like calling him “my little SWEET Potato” -like in Toy Story- when he reads “yam”) just to get him through them all. The fluency sheets are the same way, so these ideas should really help. Thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kimberly,
My kids love when we get silly with words too. They like to make their own silly sentences too. Thank you for sharing.

I’m going to use these when going over the word cards! Thank you to all the creative people out there that share their ideas!

Dori

says:

Hi,
I have an older daughter (12) with a closed learning gate. This caused her to have a form of dyslexia but it is different than the common dyslexia that just transposes letters and numbers. She spells phonetically and has a great deal of difficulty retaining the spelling words she has already learned. She is highly visual and learns well with songs (has a great memory.) Does anyone have any suggestions for games or CD’s that have spelling songs on them that could help her? We are using AAS3 but would like a backup to reinforce what she has learned. Thank you. Dori PS we do not us AAR because she reads on her level and has good comprehension skills.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Dori,
The few spelling songs I’ve seen are all lower level, like very beginning spelling and aimed at preschoolers/kindergartners. However, it sounds like she might find oral spelling helpful for learning. Do you do much oral spelling?

For games, the Reading Kaboom game here can be adapted for spelling. One person draws the card and the other spells it. The speller keeps the cards they spell correctly.

A fun spelling review and snack all in one is to review the word cards using alphabet food, such as Scrabble JR Cheez-Its. This is a huge hit in my house.

A more challenging game, although it sounds simple, is to play memory with the word cards. Lay a bunch face down, and players have to find a matching pair. The trick is that they aren’t exactly the same word, but rather they have to find a pair that uses the same rule, spelling pattern, or something like that in common. If a player finds a pair, they have to explain what the words have in common. This practices the “Word Analysis” activities that AAS introduces in Level 3. Learning to analyze words helps encourage critical thinking in spelling.

If you have a Trivial Pursuit game, you can substitute the various spelling cards (red, blue, yellow, green) for the types of categories in the game.

I hope this gives you some ideas.

Christina

says:

My four year old is a mover and shaker so I sometimes have the practice reading cards hidden around the house. We play cold or hot until he finds one. If he reads it correctly then he gets to check it off the master list. Once all are found and he successfully read each one he gets to pick a fun book for me to read to him or board game to play.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Christina,
What a great way to make reading exciting and fun for a very young reader! Thank you for sharing.

Jessica

says:

Great ideas! I can’t wait to get started with this program!

Tracy

says:

If you like to bake, one thing we like to do from time to time is make letter and word sugar cookies. I use my go to sugar cookie recipe. I roll out the dough and cut it into squares and rectangles using a pizza cutter. Once the cookies are baked, I write words and letters on the cookies using royal icing. The kids can spell words using the cookie “tiles”, read the words on the cookies, and then eat a few for a snack. I put the extras in a container to use over the course of the next few days.

Tracy

says:

We do something similar to the beach ball game to review spelling words. This works great to help multiple kids review at the same time. Each kid gets a balloon, and sometimes a few extras. The kids hit the balloons up in the air and around the room. When I say stop, the kids catch a balloon. They grab a marker. I give them a word from their card pile, and they write it on the balloon. Then we go again.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Tracy,
Ooo, I like this idea! I’m trying to do more fun review at least once a week, so I definitely will be trying this one out. Thank you for sharing.

Beth

says:

I feel as though maybe I’ve been using the word cards in AAS incorrectly after reading this post…I’ve been using them to review the spelling (I hold a stack of cards and ask him to spell them). Is he just supposed to read them??

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Beth,
No, you are using the All About Spelling cards correctly. The majority of the activities in this post really only apply to the All About Reading cards, that students are supposed to read. You may be able to adapt some of the activities for spelling review, by you reading them and asking the student to spell them. The Kaboom game could be adapted this way.

Just this week we asked our Facebook fans for ideas for practicing spelling without paper. They are very creative. I especially love the idea of using alphabet Cheez-Its!

Tracy

says:

Beth, It can be a bit harder to come up with creative ways to practice the spelling cards. My 5 year old loves when I let him write his words on the window instead of paper. I wash the window first, because mine are usually dirty and the markers write better on a clean window, the give him a word. He writes it using a Crayola ultra washable marker or Expo dry erase marker. The Expo markers show up better but the Crayola wash up better if it gets on the wall or window frame.

Sarah

says:

Just started using AAR level 1 with my kinder and she’s loving it! These ideas will make review time more engaging and fun for both of us. Thanks!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
You are welcome. I hope you both have a lot of fun this year!

Lisa Clark-Burnell

says:

Our kids like to read the cards and find a way to visually organize them so they are somehow related to one another. I ask them to sort the words in a way that makes sense to them. Sometimes they sort them by parts of speech, sometimes, they’ll place them in almost-sentences. Most typically, they try to sort them into rows and columns based on some kind of phonetic similarity: all the “ai” words in a row, all the “ay” words in another row. They look for linking words too– words that rhyme or alliterate from a bridge to another group of words.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lisa,
Wow, talk about analytical thinking! This is awesome.

Faye

says:

Those are great ideas. Anything to make school fun!!

Rachel C

says:

Thank you for the great ideas! I am excited to try some out!

Charlotte

says:

Great ideas! Love AAS!

Shannon

says:

There are a lot of great ideas here. I look forward to giving some of them a try with my son.

Rachel R

says:

I love all these suggestions! I can’t wait to try them with my boy.

Angie

says:

I love all the great help on your site!

chriseni pulse

says:

Would love to use these learning tools with my daughters!

Becca

says:

Love this curriculum.

Allison

says:

Great ideas!

Tara

says:

This has been so helpful. I just started homeschooling my active five- year- old, and we had already been doing flash cards of many words. I could tell he was getting bored, so I did a few of these games. We have a baby right now who takes up a lot of my time, but I can play these with him while I feed the baby. He has had a lot of fun not sitting in one place, and I am able to focus on him mentally while physically getting things done because we often both move around. He’s into “sheriff” stuff, and loves to try to lasso things. He also likes to fish, so we have used his fake fishing pole (a swiffer extender rod with rope on the end) or lasso to “catch” flash cards strewn about on the ground. If he gets them right, he puts them in his bucket or corral, and if not they go back in the pond or field. He enjoys flashcard time now!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Tara,
I love the fishing and lasso idea! Thank you for sharing.

Penny

says:

We have posted cards on a fence and whacked them with a foam sword if he knows it. He loves it.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Penny,
Of course he loves it! Who wouldn’t? Thanks for sharing this fun idea.

Kirsten

says:

Love the beach ball idea! Great ideas for my active boy who is just starting AAR. He is so excited to read. I want to keep that up and I know these review games will help!

Amanda Moore

says:

These are great, we’ve been blazing through the cards and moving on but I think drilling them several different fun ways would make them a homerun!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Amanda,
It’s fine to move on if your child is mastering the cards easily, but some extra fun review never hurts!

Dee Anne

says:

We are definitely going to try some of these ideas during our review times!!

Becky

says:

I like the beach ball idea!

Julie K.

says:

I love the one with the bouncy ball! My son will love this. And if we can avoid eye rolling…all the better!!!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Julie,
OH, no, not the eye rolling. But these games and activities can cure eye rolling. :) I played Kaboom! with my daughter this week, with her older brothers getting in on the fun, and she happily reviewed for over 30 minutes with no eye rolling.

Becky

says:

I love these ideas for my guy. Can’t wait to try some of them.

Jenni N

says:

LOVE these ideas for my very wiggly son! Thanks!

Karis

says:

I love these tips – will definitely come in handy for my twins who are starting kindergarten this year :)

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Karis,
Having two at the same level would make playing games for review even easier. Have fun!

CabotMama

says:

We have an iPad spelling app that allows me to create lists based on steps kids just completed. The kids then spell the words using tiles color coded much like the AAS tiles. Working on the iPad is a special treat, so they love Friday review time.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

CabotMama,
Interesting! And kind of tricky, using kids’ love for electronics to get some extra review in. Thank you for sharing.

Stacy

says:

I tape cards all around out fence, and have the boys kick a ball towards them. Whichever card they hit, they have to read. We have also adapted this to hockey and basketball. Anything to keep the boys moving!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Stacy,
Wow, that is VERY active. I’d call it PE and reading both!

Courtney

says:

Love these ideas for every child, but particularly my energetic boys!

Lynn

says:

I know my child would enjoy the coloring idea. Thanks!

Rosanne

says:

Love this post! Will use the ideas for my very kinesthetic 5-year-old learner.

Melanie

says:

I will definitely be needing these ideas for my son who is just starting level one!!

Nadja

says:

We love to take the cards outside and use them while on the trampoline.

Sarah

says:

Thanks for these great ideas! I will be using them all!

Robin

says:

Even my older kids would enjoy the color-by-word idea. Thanks!

Sarah J

says:

We play the hide it game. One person leaves the room and they have name the missing card. My 4.5 loves it!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
Depending on how many cards you have out, that could be very challenging. Sounds like fun though. Thank you for sharing.

Vera

says:

just ordered our first year of AAS materials! Excited!

Amy Williams

says:

What we do with the cards is that I show and say them one at a time and make 3 stacks. Then I collect them and show/say them again to him and put them in 2 stacks. Collect them again and show/say them to him again and make one stack. Then I just flip them one at a time to him and he says them back to me. I collect these cards and add 4 more lessons to them doing the same routine. Then with all the cards we play 1:2 Game. I show/say 1 card and he says the next 2 until we go through the stack. Each time he gets them correct he keeps the cards. We go through all the cards until he gets most of them. We haven’t done it yet with the AAR. Then we use these cards for copy work and handwriting. It is so awesome to have a curriculum you can use for many other subjects. I am still working into integrating AAR with everything. I use Little Giant Steps techniques also with AAR and AAS. I just LOVE the ideas that I get when I plan out each week. My goal is to get a lot of input before I make him output the information. That is what I was doing wrong at the beginning but that is how we are taught in colleges when we become educators in the public schools. ALL OUTPUT and LITTLE INPUT.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Amy,
Interesting observation about how much we input and how much output we expect. Thank you. Also, consider trying to incorporate more hands-on in the learning as well, like maybe show the word card, read it to him, and have him build it with tiles and then read the tiles.

Becky G

says:

Thanks for great ideas! I would like to try the live size game! I think my daughter would like it!

sara beyda

says:

way cool ideas! so easy yet my kid will realy learn with these I’ll try it! you got me in!

Kiesha

says:

Great ideas!

Gale

says:

What great ideas! Some of these would work for spelling too. :-)

Michelle R

says:

Could these cards help with comprehension too – act out words, match to pictures/objects or have child draw a picture to represent the word? Seems like they could!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
I suppose you could use the cards for vocabulary building; although most child know the meaning of the majority of the word cards very well.

Comprehension is more of understanding meaning in context, and not isolated words. This article explains many of the ways All About Reading works on comprehension.

Christina Wells

says:

Great ideas!

Judith Martinez

says:

These are great ideas!! One of the things I’m hoping to add to our school is Charlotte Mason style card file memorization and these ideas could be used for that as well.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Judith,
Yes! One of the things I love about the All About Reading and All About Spelling review cards is that the concept can be adapted to all sorts of subjects. Marie describes how she used index cards for all kinds of things in this blog post on Organizational Tools I Couldn’t Homeschool Without.

JP

says:

I like and will try the one with the cards on the stairs and creating and adventure. Also may try the nerf gun idea below as well.

Steph

says:

Lots of great ideas. We have also laid the word cards on the floor and shot them with a nerf gun. Even doing tricks, like you have to jump and spin around and then shoot. Nothing like adding a few extra components, visual, spatial, exercise…and it was all his idea which is the best part. Kind of a boy thing.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Steph,
Oh, I think I may be borrowing this idea this week! Thank you for sharing.

Kimberly

says:

My 7 almost 8 year old isn’t reading much yet, can I use the two programs at the same time?

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kimberyly,
We recommend starting All About Spelling after the child has finished All About Reading Level 1, or the equivalent reading level. While learning to read, students pick up basic skills that will enable them to spell more easily. You can find more information on this article, The Right Time to Start. Once your child is ready for All About Reading Level 2, we recommend starting All About Spelling Level 1, and doing both each day at the student’s individual pace in each.

You can use the placement tests for All About Reading to decide which level your child would need. Also, we recommend having your child read the sample stories from the previous level online as a further confirmation. You want your child to be reading fluently with good comprehension before going to a higher level.

Level 1 sample story
Level 2 sample story
Level 3 sample story
Level 4 sample story

Evaluate (without correcting your child) the following…
Your child’s ability to decode the words in the story.
Your child’s ability to comprehend the story.
Could your child fluently read the story with expression?
Did your child understand the words from a vocabulary standpoint?

I hope this helps. Please let us know if we can help in any further way.

Becky Back

says:

These are great ideas! Always looking for ways to make things fun.

camille

says:

What great, doable ideas to incorporate, I especially like the “active” ones. Thank you!

Allison Dobbins

says:

THANK YOU so much for these ideas! These are great ways to spice up the day a little, and I think they’ll be a big hit around here!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Allison,
You are welcome! It’s hard to imagine these games and activities not being a hit.

Athena

says:

Some of these ideas will work perfectly in our home. Thank you.

Jessica

says:

Can’t wait to try!!

Sarah Binkley

says:

I recently purchased All About Reading and All About Spelling; I will be using both of these programs for my home school this year. I am teaching three grandchildren, ages 10-7-3 years. I have already planned my first month of work for each child. We may have to “tweak” things as we go along but I think my kiddos will have lots of fun using this material. Thank you for creating this easy-to-use program for a busy Mammaw!!!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
You are welcome!

Just remember that All About Reading and All About Spelling are designed to be used at the individual student’s pace. We recommend working for 20 minutes a day in AAR and 15 to 20 minutes a day in AAS, and then you pick up the next day where you left off. Because of this, it is difficult plan out where a student will be at the end of a week, let alone the end of a month.

Please let us know if we can answer any questions or help in any way.

Lori Dickinson

says:

Can not wait to try it.

Jessica

says:

I love all these ideas they are perfect for my son. Thanks so much for writing this post.

Sandy

says:

Love these ideas I am going to start using them with my children right away.

jessica wilson

says:

I love your blogs, lots of valuable information

Dawn

says:

Thanks for the great ideas….lots of fun to try!

mary herman

says:

Would love to win aas 6. Great creative ideas for reviewing.

Sarah

says:

Thank you for such helpful ideas. This is where my mind draws a blank.

Cara

says:

love so many of these ideas!

Cassie

says:

Great ideas!

Francia Brisita

says:

I post the word cards all over the classroom then the students walk around the classroom, find the cards and write on their reading journal.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Francia,
Sounds fun! Thank you for the idea.

Michelle

says:

I love all these ideas! I want to make school fun and active. One of my goals this year is to incorporate more games. I’m definitely doing the life size game board.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
I’m glad we could help toward one of your goals!

Judy Hinson

says:

Great ideas! Will have to try a few this year.

Tracy

says:

I have a very active 7yo who can’t sit still for very long, so these ideas are wonderful. I’m definitely going to try these out.

Jenny

says:

These are great ideas! I am constantly trying to come up with ways to keep my fidgity and very hands-on learner entertained!

Kara Mattson

says:

How is it that in nearly twenty years of home schooling, I only just now discovered this! Thank you, thank you for all the wonderful ideas that have inspired this worn out momma!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kara,
Don’t feel too bad, Kara. I’m not good at thinking up these sorts of things either. We have so many ideas for fun activities and games for review like these because we collect them for moms all over.

Laurie

says:

These are some great ideas!

Sarah

says:

I love the suggestions for review with physical activity like running and playing catch with beachball! I have some wiggly boys and getting the wiggles out is very important.

Steve Heidtbrink

says:

Like these programs, wish I had them as kid & would like to have them for a little girl.

Victoria B

says:

Great ideas for making learning fun and interactive!

Hope Wilke

says:

I love the flexibility, simplicity and the different learning styles covered with this program. I recommend this to anyone and everyone looking for great reading or spelling program.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Hope,
Thank you for sharing AAR and AAS.

Jill

says:

Love the All About Reading program. Would love to try All About Spelling with it!

Cassidy allison

says:

I need to try the bouncy beach ball idea!!

Donna

says:

Love these idea! Love to keep the kids moving and love the art one!

April

says:

I love the color-by-word idea!

Sheila

says:

Thank you! We used some of these ideas today! :)

Tonya Rollins

says:

Great ideas! I’ve been researching All About Spelling for a while and I’m looking forward to trying it soon.

Nikki

says:

The exercise ball is GREAT – my son loves bouncing around on it while we’re doing AAR and AAS lessons!

Phoebe Tompkins

says:

I love these ideas!!!

Katie Bishop

says:

We have AAS Level 1 to start this year and I am getting pretty excited to start! These are amazing ideas!! Thanks so much for sharing!!

Amanda Hartsock

says:

I love these ideas! Definitely going to use color by word, board game, and beach ball!

Rachel E

says:

I like the BOOM flash card idea. Way to keep it fun and not seem like “school”.

Kimberly L.

says:

Thank you for always sharing so many invaluable methods! I, too, have two very active boys! There is no sitting around a table schooling…we have to be up and moving as much as possible! Keep the tips coming!

Lee Ann Beyer

says:

All of the games you list sound like so much fun. We have not yet purchased the program because we are waiting to find out if our adoption has been approved but I can’t wait to get started.

D

says:

This looks like a wonderful program for hands on learners. We have tried some of the activities and they have gotten my children’s attention-the are having fun!!!! We used to review flashcards while on the trampoline but these ideas will give us much more variety.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

D,
Trampolines are great fun, but it is always nice to have more variety with review ideas. Thank you for sharing.

Jennifer Hoegemeyer

says:

Looking forward to trying it.

Sheila

says:

Thanks for these tips! I definitely have a wiggly one.

Kim

says:

Great way to make it fun for them!

Cathy

says:

Love these ideas for review. This will work for reading , also vocab and other memory facts. Just need to implement into our schedule

Abbi Cord

says:

We love to say or sing things in funny voices. We speak everything from whale to robot.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Abbi,
That would be fun! I could see us using all kinds of accents too. As a family, we really enjoy accents!

Jenn Michniewicz

says:

This article is great! Especially as we are about to start a new school year. My daughter was starting to dread our AAS review time last spring.
Thanks!

Melissa

says:

Thank you for all these great ideas!

Laura Madsen

says:

We are looking forward to starting back up this fall. This will be our second year :)

Lisa Lambert

says:

Love this curriculum.

Carrie

says:

This is a great idea! Thanks!

Rachael

says:

I love this program!

Catherine

says:

I’ve just started using All About Spelling with my son. Thank you for the ideas on how to review the cards when we get a little further into the program!

Penina Williams

says:

Thank you!

Rose Bates

says:

We are just being introduced to AAR and AAS. With a 3rd grader that still.struggles with fluent reading and a kindergartner, I’m excited to approach reading in a different way.

Racheal

says:

What great ideas to shake things up a bit! I can’t wait to try them with my kiddos!

Linda

says:

Do you have any suggestions for 9th grader who has ADHD and comprehension issues?

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Linda,
Reading comprehension issues can happen for a variety of reasons. For example:

1. gaps in phonogram knowledge
2. fluency issues (Students can sound out what they read but can’t read it fluently. If they are focusing on the work of reading, they won’t be able to focus on understanding what they read.)
3. word guessing issues (Students rely on word-guessing strategies, and incorrect guesses lead to a lack of comprehension. Some also skip small words.)
4. reading too fast (Sometimes the opposite of fluency issues is the case. Students think that a “good reader” reads very quickly. Students who do this tend not to have time to think about the meaning of text. See our blog post on reading too fast for more information.)
5. vocabulary issues (Students may have the phonics skills to sound out and read words that they don’t know the meaning of yet; this can happen especially with young, advanced readers. For example, think of a simple word like “milkman.” How many 21st century kids would have any idea what a milkman is?!)
6. lack of life experience (They can’t relate to what they are reading, again usually because of young age.)
7. they do understand but feel overwhelmed when asked to put what they know into words (If this is the case for your student, you might notice similar issues with listening comprehension.)

A student may need more specific prompts to share what he knows. Sometimes reading a passage and expecting the child to explain it back in his own words will overwhelm students; they don’t know where to start and just can’t do it. In that case, you probably would be more successful if you gave your student prompts. Marie uses this example: Find out something that the he is really interested in, such as “raising turtles.” Get a book and read a section aloud to him, such as the section on “what kinds of food should you feed your turtle.” Then start a discussion with the student, and incorporate some of the new info that you just read in the book. “I never knew that you could feed lettuce to turtles! What else can you feed turtles?” Then read the part on habitats of box turtles. Start a discussion on that. “If you were to set up a tank for a box turtle, what kinds of things should you include in it?”

These types of conversations will show the student’s level of listening comprehension much better than the traditional way for a couple of reasons: 1. The student is more likely to be engaged in the topic. (Oftentimes, kids’ attention wanders during typical reading comprehension passages or books that they aren’t interested in.) 2. The student doesn’t “freeze up” and therefore can relay more info (just being asked to repeat what was read can be a scary or uncomfortable moment).

Back to reading comprehension: if the measure of comprehension is written, he may feel bored (it’s busy work) or overwhelmed by the task of writing, or the questions asked may be overly picky (focusing on aspects of the story that were unimportant, for example).

Do you have your student read aloud daily? If not, this is a really good way for you to be able to assess what’s going on and why he is struggling with comprehension. It’s hard to catch problems without hearing the student read. If the materials are beyond his vocabulary or life experience, he will need more help to understand what he is reading, for example.

Sometimes, parents choose materials on the edge of a student’s reading ability; the student is capable of reading the words, but because the student has to work at reading, he doesn’t have brain power left for comprehension. So, you might assess whether that is happening. Materials need to be easy enough for students to focus on reading to learn, instead of focusing on the act of reading. Here’s an article that specifically addresses how we teach reading comprehension.

You might take a look at some of the sample All About Reading lessons for ideas too. The comprehension exercises are in the Teacher’s Manuals, and gradually get more involved with each successive level. So, look at several levels to see the progression.

I hope this gives you some help. Please let us know if we can help in any further way, either here or by email (support@allaboutlearningpress.com) or phone (715-477-1976).

Melissa

says:

Good ideas – thanks for taking the time to pass them along.

Karen

says:

I am so grateful for all of these creative ideas, as I am not naturally able to satisfy my kids’ kinesthetic and fun learning needs!

Stephanie Warren

says:

Thank you so much for these amazing ideas!!!!

Marie Jones

says:

I can’t wait to try some of these ideas out with my boys. They’re really struggling with reading and I’ve run out of ideas to make it fun. Thanks!!

Kelly Arndt

says:

These are GREAT!!! Can’t wait to try them with my 1st grader!

Genevieve

says:

I love the integration of kinesthetics!

Amy

says:

Great ideas!

Jen

says:

Very excited about trying this!!

Jennifer

says:

Love these ideas! Thanks for posting! :)

Shawnda Kirchmeier

says:

Just starting Level One. We are loving it!

Cindy

says:

This looks like an interesting program that would work with my younger children.

Garilyn

says:

The life size board game sounds fun!

Carol

says:

Fun ideas! Thanks!

Corri Montgomery

says:

Thank you for all of the great new ideas. We will definitely be using some of them.

Dusti

says:

Thanks for all the great ideas!

S Boden

says:

These ideas look great!I am excited to try some of them.
My younger kids enjoy stringing glow-in-the-dark letter beads onto pipe cleaners and reading their words in the dark.
Thanks!

Jennifer

says:

Love that idea, thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

S Boden,
Oh, glow-in-the-dark letter beads would be so much fun! Great review idea, thank you for sharing.

Laura

says:

These games sound so fun!

Hope

says:

What a lot of fun ideas!! Thank you!

Heather Gonzalez

says:

Great ideas :)

CHRISTY CANAVAN

says:

I love your game ideas for reviewing word cards.

Nicole M

says:

I’m super excited to try these out with my daughter…she’ll love them! Thanks for sharing!

Melissa Crane

says:

Thanks for sharing these ideas. I get stuck in wanting to just plow through the reviews and my kids really resist reading through lists day after day. Using some of these ideas will help make the task more enjoyable for all of us.

Eleasha Tate

says:

Lots of great ideas, thanks for sharing.

VWard

says:

Great ideas!

Carol Kittle

says:

I visited your class at the homeschool convention in Nashville. You gave some great ideas for troubled readers. I’ve been following your advice all summer with my grandson and his reading has improved so much. I would love to use the All About Reading curriculum but already purchased another program and my curriculum budget is depleted! Sure hope to win your curriculum! It’s great!

May

says:

My son hates going over the reviews because it takes so long. I desperately needed some ideas on how to make it more fun and I love all the ideas shared here. I can’t wait to see the look of excitement on his face when we “play” reviews.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

May,
We mean for the review of All About Reading cards to take just 2 or 3 minutes on most days. Those word cards can stack up over time, but you do not have to review every card every day if the stack gets thick. Just move through as many as you can in those 2 to 3 minutes, and pick up where you left off the next day.

We really do want reading to take just 20 minutes each day, and if you spend 20 minutes on review, that would be all the reading for the day. When my daughter was struggling to gain fluency, I did do review days at least once a week or so, where we did nothing but the review cards, and possibly part of an old fluency page, for the day’s lesson time. The games and activities are excellent for such review days.

cherie

says:

using this as our spelling curriculum in home school this year

Loreen G

says:

Great ideas! We really enjoy your spelling curriculum and plan to use it through all the books.

Colleen

says:

Some great ideas here! Thank you so much. I’ll try using them with my 6 yr old. :)

Annie

says:

I need a little clarification. I thought the review of the word cards was to have the student spell them again (with tiles or written). But from this post it seems that the way to review the word cards is to READ them? Just want to make sure I’m not missing something. We love AAS!

Lydia R.

says:

I think these are for reviewing AAR, not AAS word cards.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Annie,
In All About Spelling, the word card review is to have the student spell them. However, in All About Reading, the word card review is to have the student read them. It depends on which program you are using, and the activities shared here are for All About Reading.

Although on second look, that Review Box photo at the top of the blog post IS showing an All About Spelling Review Box! We may need to fix that. Sorry for the confusion.

Kimberly

says:

The All About Spelling program is truly a multi-sensory method for teaching reading and spelling. The activities are research based. I have used these teaching techniques in private practice as a speech-language pathologist working with children learning to read.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kimberly,
Thank you for taking the time to post this. It is encouraging for parents to hear someone else confirm that our methods are based on research and have proven very effective in all types of learning environments.

Caryn

says:

These are great ideas. Can’t wait to try several out with my own kids!

Johnna

says:

I am excited to start using this program with my boys. Love all of the ideas to make learning fun!

Brenda

says:

I LOVE these ideas!!! All About Spelling sounds like a great program!!!

Magela Gonzalez

says:

Thank you for such great ideas!

Tiffany

says:

Thank you for the great ideas!

Tiffany

says:

Thank you for the ideas

Lacey

says:

Thanks for all of these great ideas! My daughter sometimes gives me a hard time about review. I’m sure these fun ideas will allow her to enjoy it much more!

PAULETTE VINCENT

says:

All these creative ideas are so helpful for days when I am “Braindead” by noon from struggling with my children.

Susan

says:

We are into day 2 of the AAR program. I am LOVING it so far! I can’t wait to keep moving forward, and eventually add the AAS program.

Stacy

says:

These are all such awesome ideas!!

Tiffany

says:

Awesome idea!!!

Brook

says:

Fabulous! We love to play to learn!

Brigitta

says:

Great ideas!

Melissa Bass

says:

I just put air in my exercise ball. My daughter is going to love that one!

Oh, such wonderful ideas!!!! Our little girl is in a wheelchair (spina bifida), but even the active ideas I can find ways to adapt. Just what we needed here at the beginning of the school year. Thank you!!!!

Holly Kellam

says:

Thanks for these great ideas! We were experiencing some burnout the end of last year, so I will be trying some of these soon.

April Eilertson

says:

Lots of great ideas to use with memorization. I have an active learner and I am always looking for different ways to present information to him.

Nancy Minarik

says:

I am going to use some of these ideas with my two boys, 5- and 7-years old, and turn them into races with each boy using his own word cards. I can’t wait to try it out!

Liz Day

says:

These ideas were great & will provide “refreshment” to our regular routine. Thanks so much!!

Tessa

says:

What a great idea for fidgety kids! I cannot wait to try this today!

I can’t wait to use some of these tips with my little ones.

Mae

says:

Thank you for these tips!

Autumn

says:

Very neat ideas!!

Kim

says:

We love the All About Spelling programs. To help expend a little extra energy, we set up a Hop-n-Spell area. Some large felt squares placed on the carpet in a big circle. As they say each letter of the word they are spelling, they hop to the next square. Lets them practice their spelling words and be active at the same time!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kim,
This sounds like it would be especially great on those days when the weather is bad. Thank you for sharing it.

Michelle

says:

Great ideas to keep children in motion while learning.

Jeanne

says:

I will definitely try some of these ideas with my daughter to help the review process be more fun and effective. Thank you:)

Stephanie

says:

It’s true that sometimes you just need to get creative with how to teach children. I know my boys get bored having to sit at a desk for too long. Thanks for the tips and some good ideas that I will definitely try.

Amanda

says:

What great ideas!!!

Nikki

says:

These are great! Will definitely have to try them.

Cindy

says:

Hi…
How about when it comes to reviewing word cards for my ADHD 14yr old 9th grader. I am having a hard time keeping him focused and sitting still….help!! Any comments or ideas would br greatly appreciated!! Thanks so much!! ;)

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Cindy,
Sitting still is not necessary for review. In fact, many people, especially those with ADHD, focus better if allowed to move. Allow him to stand to do the cards. Consider purchasing an exercise ball for him to sit and bounce on. My almost 19 year old took Legos away to college, so that he could have something to twiddle and play with his his hands while studying. He also took Thinking Putty, which is similar to Silly Putty, but cooler. He focuses much better if he has something to mess with. You might be surprised how much better your son does if he holds the cards himself and reads them while standing and walking around.

Many of the games here might seem baby-ish to a 14 year old, but there are other ideas that he might be up for that may be too messy for younger kids. He could try throwing the cards, as he reads them, into a hat, like you would playing cards. How accurate is he with his Nerf? You could hold a card up, he can read it, and then he gets to shoot it (I recommend holding at arms length and wearing eye protection).

You can also try another time of day. Most people have a time of day when they can focus most effectively, and other times of day when their mind just wanders. For some, first thing in the morning is best. For others, morning is awful and afternoon is best. Try a new time of day and see if you notice a difference.

I hope this gives you something that will help. Let us know if we can help any further.

Julie

says:

Everyone is so creative! I think many of these ideas will be great to rotate.

Faith Vittitoe

says:

This comes at a very good tie for us. Thanks!

Debra

says:

Whew..my mind is spinning with all the information here. It feels a little overwhelming to start this when looking at all the ideas!

Merry at AALP

says: Customer Service

Hi Debra,

Don’t worry about starting with these at all. Just go through the program as scripted. Daily review with the word cards is about 2-3 minutes generally, and then you pick up in the book wherever you left off previously. If you ever hit a point where you want to do more review and need ideas, or if you just want to change things up once or twice a week, pull out this post. If you forget where it is, email us–we’re always glad to help!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Debra,
Oh, no! We didn’t mean to be overwhelming. We meant to give you a few ideas and allow you to pick a couple that seemed fun, yet doable.

Actually, you don’t need to do these games and activities at all. All About Reading is full of review and activities, and is enough all by itself. These suggestions here are just ideas to change things up, and get the extra wiggles out of your kids while reviewing words at the same time.

Please don’t feel overwhelmed. If you need help for anything, we are here for you.

Kylene

says:

These are some great ideas. I’ll definitely be trying them!

Rita Hester

says:

I have a daughter with Down’s Syndrome that I have been working on teaching to read for several years. She is, academically, at a very low level. (I am so glad that, socially, she is much more advanced than that) She does better with fewer distractions while reviewing her phonics cards. We began by her playing “against” Ma. If she read the card correctly, it was hers. If she did not, it went back into “Ma’s” stack. If I tried to give an example of a word using that letter or combination, it was too much information and confused her. We now play the game a little differently. She has the stack of cards in front of her. If she reads the card correctly, she puts it into the file box herself. If she reads it incorrectly, I tell her the correct reading and she puts it a few cards further back in the stack. Eventually she reads all of the cards correctly and they are all back in the box. This gives her a sense of independence while still reviewing her cards. And I know that she read them correctly. This may not help anyone else. It may just be a Down’s thing.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Rita,
I do not think this is exclusively a Down’s thing. I do have one child, without Down’s, that gets worse if I give hints or help. If she gets it wrong twice, I sound it out and read it for her, then have her “read” it right then. I like your method of putting the word back into the stack for further reinforcement. Thank you for sharing it.

Maegan

says:

Thanks! My active little guy especially loves activities with balls, so these are perfect!

Cindy

says:

Use word cards instead of dice to play a board game, such as Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders, etc. Place all cards face down in a pile. Child draws a card. If they read it successfully, they move forward the same number of spaces as there are letters in the word (if the words you are working with are all the same length, you may want to assign point values to the words beforehand by writing a number on each card and using that to determine how many spaces to move).

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Cindy,
Nice twist on regular board games! Thank you for sharing this idea.

A similar idea someone has shared with us is to use the board and some of the pieces from Trivial Pursuit. You can use the yellow, green, blue, and pink pieces to match up with the yellow, green, blue, and red cards in All About Spelling.

Patti

says:

These games are great! It makes it easy for me to just steal your fun ideas. Especially since this is my first time using AAS and AAR…and homeschooling eek! But I take confidence in these programs.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Patti,
Don’t “eek” about homeschooling. It might not be easy, but it is so worth it (said from the point of view of having just taken my oldest child to college last week). You can do this! We will help. :D

Amy

says:

I love getting new ideas like this. Thanks! We have been using All About Spelling for 2 years now with our 13 year old and are so pleased with the results! After taking a break this summer and now starting up again in the last week, I am so thrilled as I not only see spelling improved but even improved penmanship. I attribute this from the consistent dictation that is included with the AAS lessons. I am one happy Mom and I have one confident kid!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Amy,
That consistent dictation, slowly building in difficulty from level to level, really pays off, doesn’t it? I loved the side bonus of it improving my son’s working memory. Some of the sentences in the higher levels can get a bit long.

Danette

says:

Thanks for sharing these fun ideas!

Kristin

says:

We are just using the AAS so I really liked the letter maze idea. You could also have them run and grab the letters to make the word.

Amy

says:

Thank you for the ideas! I’ll be trying a few.

Lois Babcock

says:

Starting all about reading this fall with my 9yr old with multiple learning disabilities. Hoping to use all about spelling in the future as well.

Brenda

says:

Thank you :) sometimes I just need a little inspiration!

Kelly Briggs

says:

A favorite around here is writing the words on the back sliding door in dry erase, arming my son with a nerf gun and letting him shoot the words. If he reads the word he shoots correctly, I erase it off the window.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kelly,
Another great idea! I saw one similar on our Facebook page, only there the child was using blunt tipped arrows and a real bow! Target practice and reading review, all in one!

Thank you for sharing.

mistie

says:

Thank you so much for these ideas! We are working through the PAL reading/writing curriculum and are fixing to begin All About Spelling in a few weeks. We are so excited and I know my son will LOVE these games better than just reading the word cards. It is nice (and easier) not to have to “invent” a game :)

Melissa Q

says:

I can’t wait to try these ideas out! Learning should be fun!

A Mantzey

says:

Great ideas! Activities i can use with both my kids!

Myra

says:

What great ideas! I will definitely be using some of these!

Brigitte Brorman

says:

I’m not at this stage with my child yet, but I’ll be keeping these activities in mind for my little girl. She’s the type that learns better when moving.

Keely

says:

These are fantastic ideas; thank you for ways to make a fun program even better for my son 😀.

Notasha Glumske

says:

I have never tried and of the Alll About…programs, but will be using Spelling & Reading this year with my 3rd grader. My homeschooling friends rave about it-so I’m looking very forward to this experience!

Martina

says:

Love these ideas! We just started level 1 this week! Looking forward to incorporating these ideas!

Lisa

says:

Great ideas. Thank you!

Bethany

says:

We are just so happy to have found this program. My fourth grader struggles with reading so I ordered the complete All About Reading set for his level. I think All About Spelling will be a great complement to that.

melissa shepard

says:

Thanks for a great program and wonderful tips and ideas!!!

Desiree

says:

My second grader is reading better, but when she gets it on paper its phonetic, but a mess…

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Desiree,
Do you mean that her spelling is a mess? Is she using All About Spelling? We would love to help, if you can give us a bit more information. You can email us at support@allaboutlearningpress.com, if you would like to take the conversation off of the public blog.

Amanda

says:

These are great ideas! We start school next week and I can’t wait to start using AAR and AAS with my school aged kids. Doing these fun/active things wouldn’t have crossed my mind, so I’m glad to have the ideas from the get-go.

tracy

says:

Great ideas! We have been skipping the review cards but spending more time than I’d like on review “teaching” time. Looking forward to trying a few of these! Thank you.

Kim Buterbaugh

says:

Great ideas! Can’t wait to try them with my daughters!

Claire Hall

says:

Awesome tips! Thank you! We love All About Spelling!

Sonali

says:

Great ideas! Thanks for sharing!

Sarah

says:

Thanks…these are great! We are doing AAR Level 1 this year, and I have benefitted so much from the creative ideas for teaching on the blogs and forums. Thank you!

My son’s favorite game so far is “feed the monster.” I catch the words in my hand as the monster “eats” them, and when he gets them all done, the monster “poops” them out. I had no idea this would be the most motivating thing for my five year old to practice his word cards and fluency sheets! Ha! I’ve even had to modify it so my 2 and 3 year old kids can play with with letter sounds and such, as they were so sad to be missing out on the fun of reading class.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
This made me smile. What is it with little kids and poop?

For anyone else reading (or if your monster gets wore out, Sarah), you can download and print the “Feed the Monster” activity on our Top 6 Tips for Fluency Pages blog post.

Holly

says:

We began AAS this year just a few weeks ago and we are thrilled! We would love to win Level 2!

Dana M.

says:

Thank you so much for the creative ideas to encourage learning! It has been a blessing to our homeschool and has helped overcome reluctance to do a lesson and created excitement instead! We love AAS & AAR and are so pleased with the results of both learning programs!

Pat Mattas

says:

Thanks, Marie, for the great ideas! I use All About Spelling exclusively in my private practice with special needs children. It is the only spelling program that has worked for me.

Tracy

says:

We tried another reading program for my boys and they were totally bored with it. We’ve all really appreciated the AAR activities and the ideas to keep it fun, which are so helpful as well!

Heather

says:

Great ideas. Love how so many of them are active ideas!

Rachel W.

says:

We use my son’s favorite board and/or card games to review word cards. Before his turn he has to read one or two of his review word cards – to gain an extra turn he can spell a word that he’s mastered. He has one of his puppets play along with himself, and I play with Ziggy the Zebra – who has to use the Mastered words and then spell a word that my son reads. I love that when he plays the puppet, and then himself, he is really getting double the word practice, without even realizing it! I loved the KaBOOM idea, and he finds it very fun too! It is good for a day when we don’t have time to play a whole game to review . . .

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Rachel,
I love that he doubles up on review with the puppet! What a great idea. Thank you for sharing.

Kathleen Starbird

says:

Love the exercise and learn ideas.

Teresa Traffas

says:

I’m so excited about these ideas!

Michelle

says:

Thank you for sharing game ideas with the community. This year, I am putting the games to use at the beginning of the year to review phonics and words. This program is amazing. I love AAS and the blog information.

Leah

says:

When we need a change of pace with our word cards, I take groups of cards and hide them around the room. My son finds a group, reads them to me, and then goes off to hunt some more!

Heather Waye

says:

Thank you! My son will love these ideas!

Kayla

says:

Great ideas, thanks!

jen giles

says:

Really exciting and diverse ways of encouraging your child. Making learning fun and challenging at the same really helps them to shine!

Autumn C

says:

Great ideas! Thanks for sharing! These will be great as we start the year!

Amy

says:

I love these ideas…especially the ones that get kids moving. The exercise ball one will be used in our house for sure! Thank you for passing these along!

KimB

says:

Looking forward to seeing the excitement and learning!

Naomi Weaver

says:

My DD loves AAS and she has learned so much! I hadn’t thought of using cards in different games!

Laura schindel

says:

I am definitely going to try the game circle idea. It will work well with spelling words too.

Monna

says:

Love AAS. So many ways to use it.

Bethany S.

says:

Some really great ideas here for review! We have just started AAR 1 and we are loving it!

Ellen W.

says:

These are great ideas!!! The fly swatter is always a hit with my boys! Love the suggestions for getting moving while learning, thanks!

Victoria

says:

My active 7 year old who just started the program is going to love these NO PREPLANNING ideas. It will be great to store some of these away for a “grumpy” day, but still get in that review time!! Thanks for sharing!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Victoria,
I agree, anything that doesn’t require prep ahead of time is wonderful! I’m glad we could give you some ideas to have on hand.

Laurie Heesen

says:

Thanks so much for the helpful ideas! I have one child who is particularly energetic and I think some word cards on stairs are in our future :). Bookmarking this page now! Thanks again.

Lori D

says:

I absolutely love All About Spelling! I like how it works as well as how affordable it is! My son doesn’t mind the small amount of time it takes. This program is definitely helping him! I need to add that I like the emails I get from time to time, on ways to enhance the already great program. Thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lori,
You’re welcome! And I’m especially glad to hear that our emails add to the program for you. Thank you for sharing that.

Jeanne Marie Marks

says:

These are Great tips!
We have a lot of memory work and most of these ideas will work great with reviewing the material. Can’t wait to try it out with my son!
Thank You!

Stacey

says:

A friend showed me the All about Reading Level 1 set. After reviewing it I fell in love! This way of teaching makes so much sense. I wish I would have known about All About Reading before I had bought my son’s current phonics and reading program.

Amber

says:

These are so great ideas! I can’t wait to put them into practice. This is our first year using AAR!

S Baker

says:

I would love to see some great ideas like these to use with spelling words.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

S Baker,
I will pass along the suggestion that we ought to do a similar blog post for spelling word cards, but in the mean time, here are some ideas.

One idea is to sort them into piles such as nouns and adjectives or verbs and adverbs (the student doesn’t need to know these parts of speech to play). Draw a card from each pile and make up random dictations phrases that way. You could also let your child draw and read a card from each pile, and then have you write a phrase. Many kids enjoy the back and forth!

Another idea is to make up simple books. Choose some phrases (ones already in All About Spelling dictations or make up your own from the word cards) and have your student write one line on each page. Then they can draw or paint a picture to go with and make up a little story.

Incorporate tactile and kinesthetic ideas to make review more fun. Marie has lots of great ideas in this article.

We have a number of free downloads you can use for spelling review games. Or use a favorite board game like Sorry or Candy-Land. Each player spells a word or answers a key card before taking his or her turn. If you have a Trivial Pursuit game, you can substitute the various spelling cards (red, blue, yellow, green) for the types of categories in the game.

This site has 30+ Kinesthetic reading/spelling ideas.

Some of the reading downloads can be adapted for spelling as well.

– The “Reading Activity Bundle” activities can be adapted. For example: “Over Easy”: hand your child the eggs one at a time–you say the word, put the egg in the pan, your child spells it out loud and then flips it with the spatula to check himself.

“Feed the Anteater” could be used for spelling as well–you can dictate the words for your to write on the blank page, and he can have the anteater swallow them after he writes each one.

– most of the games and activities include blank cards where a student can practice writing words.

Your student might enjoy Swatting Phonograms as a fun way of reviewing spelling (or reading). You can set out a selection of cards or tiles, say a word and have him swat phonograms as he spells it.

An idea for very active kids is the snowball game–use the phonogram cards for spelling practice instead of letter recognition. Some families us Nerf darts instead of snowballs!

For more games, consider getting the Ziggy supplement for some folder game options you can use for review. These coordinate with level 1 of All About Reading, but can be used with spelling review cards. In this blog post, I explained how I use Ziggy supplement games to review All About Reading Level 2, All About Spelling Level 3, and All About Spelling Level 5, all at the same time.

And here are some downloadable games that you can use to review the cards. The Phonogram File-Folder game can be adapted for use with any type of card.

There are a lot of ideas on Pinterest boards as well.
This has general spelling ideas, and this one has “get moving” ideas.

I hope this gives you plenty of ideas on how to add some fun into your spelling time. Please let us know if we can help any further.

Tracy

says:

I love some of these ideas. We just switched to AAR this year for the benefit of my son who has struggled for years with traditional phonics methods. So far, he loves it and we’ve seen improvement in decoding. The most significant change is that he looks forward to his reading lessons. What a pleasure. Love this program.

Debbie

says:

Yay, these are wonderful!!! I have the single most active child on the planet, and I was just trying yesterday to figure out ways I could make our review more hands-on and/or active for my daughter. I will definitely be using some of these ideas!!!!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Debbie,
We hear so much about “active boys” that those of us with “active girls” may feel left out. I know I do sometimes. I have three boys, but my youngest daughter is by far more active than any of my boys ever were. She is pictured in this post holding the beach ball. She loved it.

Amy

says:

We are just starting this program this year so we have yet to get bored, but thanks for all the great ideas for review. We will for sure use some of them just to keep from being bored during the year. thanks again!

Amanda

says:

Okay, I have to bookmark this. The word city and mixing review with a ball game would be great for my boys!

Micah Douglas

says:

What great ideas!

Lisa B

says:

We haven’t ever come up with a fun way to review word cards, but my kids are going to love adding some of these ideas into our routine. Thank you!

Lauren

says:

I like to create activities with the AAR/AAS spelling/reading words of the week to increase exposure and meaningfulness. I like to do an alphabetizing page/activity, definition page, use-in-a-sentence page, etc.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lauren,
Ooo, some good ideas. Do you use a worksheet generator website or something to make such pages?

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