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19 Activities for Kinesthetic Learning

You may have heard that multisensory instruction involves three types of activities:

  1. Visual
  2. Auditory
  3. Kinesthetic

Visual obviously refers to sight, and auditory refers to hearing. But what does kinesthetic mean?

The term kinesthetic refers to touching, doing, experiencing, or being physically active, and it’s one of the three main pathways to the brain.

visual kinesthetic and auditory pathways to the brain graphic

Kinesthetic Activities Are Important for All Learners

You may already know that when children are taught using all three pathways to the brain, they learn even more than when they are taught only through their strongest pathway (Farkus, 2003)1. The more senses we involve, the more learning occurs. So even if your child is an auditory or visual learner, it is still important to teach through kinesthetic activities as well. By doing so, not only will you be sure to teach to your child’s strongest pathway, but you will also maximize long-term retention of the information.

Kinesthetic activities help ingrain learning into long-term memory by turning a lesson into a physical experience. When a child is engaged in a kinesthetic activity, he is moving and touching and interacting with his lessons. And a great side benefit is that kinesthetic learning activities are usually lots of fun.

10 Free Kinesthetic Activities to Try with Your Kids

Visit these blog posts to get free kinesthetic activities to try with your children.

9 More Activities for Kinesthetic Learning

Most hands-on activities can be completed with minimal materials and with no advanced preparation. An effective spelling activity can be as simple as writing letters in the air or tapping out syllables on a kitchen counter—no materials required!

  1. Activities that use letter tiles are some of the most effective activities for teaching reading and spelling. In fact, every lesson of All About Reading and All About Spelling includes letter tiles.
  2. Live near the beach? Trace letters, words, or phonograms in the sand. Is it winter? Go outside and stomp giant letters in the snow.
  3. For some ooey-gooey fun, fill a zip-top baggie with shaving cream, whipped cream, liquid soap, glue, or pudding. Seal the bag and have your child write letters or words on the bag.
  4. Spell words while jumping on a trampoline, bouncing a ball, or playing catch. Yell out one letter for every jump, bounce, or toss!
  5. Use playdough, pipe cleaners, or Wikki Stix to form letters and words.
  6. Write letters or words in each square of a hopscotch grid. Follow standard hopscotch rules, using beanbags, stones, or bottle caps for markers. When the child stops to pick up his marker, he reads the letter or word in the square.
  7. Use a marker to write letters or words on a large beach ball. Have your child throw the ball in the air, catch it, and say the letters or words closest to his thumbs.
  8. Have a “snowball” fight using ping pong balls, Nerf balls, or crumpled paper. Write letters or words on index cards and tape them to the wall. As you call out letters or words, your child must find them and throw snowballs at them.
  9. Play hide and seek with words and sentences. Write them on pieces of paper and hide them around the room. When your child finds a piece of paper, he must read it before searching for the next one.

Kinesthetic Learning Is Fun—and the Possibilities Are Endless!

Do you have a favorite hands-on activity for teaching reading and spelling? Post in the comments below!

___________________________________
1Farkus, R.D. (2003). Effects of traditional versus learning-styles instructional methods on middle school students. The Journal of Educational Research, 97(1), 42-51.

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Leave a Comment

BrittanyNeal

says:

I love these ideas! So many I haven’t thought of! Printing the poster to keep for my reference. :)

Kim Riddle

says:

Hi, I’m looking for simple curriculum to use with 2 brothers that I’ll be tutoring this summer. I homeschooled my own 3 sons, but it has been many, many years since I taught someone to read.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kim,
All About Reading is a scripted, open-and-go program developed for busy parents, teachers, and tutors who want to teach reading in the most effective way possible. This program doesn’t require long periods of study, you don’t have to develop your own lesson plans, and you don’t have to stress over what to teach next — because everything is laid out for you, step by step.

Please let me know if you have questions, need help with placement, or need anything else.

Dawnielle

says:

Thank you for the good ideas.

Courtney

says:

I love all these ideas! I can’t wait to try the program with my students!

Melissa

says:

This is wonderful. Thank you for these ideas for my twins!

Dawn

says:

Thank-You for all the great activities. I can’t wait to try some of these with my little one.

Kristie

says:

I have used all about spelling, and love it! I’m looking forward to using All about Reading with my youngest.

Nicole R

says:

These activities are great!

Jennifer H

says:

Thank you so much for this info!

Adel

says:

Been using your curriculum – lots of great ideas!

Danah

says:

This is such a helpful article! Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Danah! 😊

Kelsey

says:

Great ideas!

Angela

says:

Kinesthetic learners are a handful. Great ideas!

Melissa W

says:

Definitely trying these! Thanks!

Laura

says:

I love all the ideas to mix things up and keep it interesting for learning!

Ashley

says:

Love your curriculum

Michelle R

says:

Thanks for the great ideas

Lisa Dorsett

says:

These are great tips for my learners! Will work with my children with these over summer break!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lisa,
I hope you have a lot of fun with these ideas this summer! We have another blog post full of summer review ideas as well, How to Beat the Summer Slide. Let me know if you need even more ideas!

Brandy

says:

Thank you for these great tips!

Kristy

says:

All very good ideas! Fun for the kiddos!

Leslie

says:

This is why I love All About EVERYTHING! I found this program a few years back when my second child wasn’t picking up on reading as quickly as his older sibling. I love how this program utilized all forms of learning just like my little man needs!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Leslie,
It’s so wonderful that All About Reading is working so well for you little man!

Kristi

says:

Love the spelling. Looking at the reading program.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Do you have any questions about All About Reading, Kristi? Just let me know.

Julie stoner

says:

Love these ideas!

Carly

says:

These ideas for kinesthetic learners will definitely get use at my house! Thank you!

Jenny Baugh

says:

Great ideas! Can’t wait to use them with my son!

Tavia White

says:

Thanks!

Molly

says:

It’s good to know what kind of style of learning is best for your child. This is very informative.

Michelle

says:

My kids definitely learn better when movement is involved.

Kelsi Chesney

says:

I love adding more ideas like this to my tool bag to help my kids on their individual path to learning.

Lauren

says:

I can’t say enough great things about AAR!! Love it!

Bethani

says:

Yes! Thank you so much, awesome info and ideas?

Renee

says:

Very creative ideas!

Lisa

says:

I am in awe of this program. We have only tried All about Reading (level 2) so far but plan to purchase All about Spelling for this next year. I am telling everyone one I meet -hairdressers, parents at parks, etc. I love learning along with my daughter. I loved explaining to a stranger why “two” has a silent ‘w’.

This is our third reading program to try. The first we tried had all the pieces but taught phonics but in a haphazard way so that activities didn’t match the lesson. The order seemed random too so that the logic was lost.

The second one did better with the order and logic of phonics but it didn’t have dedicated readers to emphasize the lesson. I had to search for readers that ended up having its own order and methodology.

It is awesome that this program did it right! I really appreciate the hard work that went into this program. This doesn’t happen without your whole heart being put into it.

Your blog is awesome too so much free helpful information.

I really wish I could have found it sooner so hopefully my random talks with strangers will help someone else start here first.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lisa,
It’s so exciting to hear that All About Reading is working out so well for you and your student! Thank you for sharing the details of why AAR has been such a great fit.

Lori

says:

Love your curriculum for my daughter who has dyslexia and other learning disabilities. Has really made a difference!

Lori Blake

says:

Fun ideas!

Mary

says:

Great ideas!

M Gomez

says:

Love the word flippers.

Jina Lea

says:

I’m going to try them with my son.

Amy D

says:

I have a 5 year old daughter who has some developmental issues. We are still trying to figure out the best way she learns. I really like the activities that you posted and looking forward to trying them with her.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
I hope your daughter enjoys these activities. If you have questions or need any help as you learn how best she learns, please let me know.

Christa

says:

Such wonderful ideas for my son. Thank you

Vanessa

says:

Great ideas for my daughter thank you!

Krista

says:

These are great! I’m excited to try them!

Love these ideas! My daughter with cancer struggles with reading and spelling. All About Learning has been a great resource to help her become a proficient reader.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rachel,
I am very sorry to hear about your daughter’s health. However, I’m happy All About Reading has helped her have success with reading.

Lisa Ingle

says:

These are some great kinaesthetic ideas! We especially need to try the one for reversals. Thanks!

Brooke Boyd

says:

Great info! Will try!

Melissa

says:

Multisensory instruction has been key in helping to unlock my son’s potential. AAS and AAR have been really great tools to get him learning and growing in confidence.

Rebecca

says:

Love the ideas, very useful!

Sarah Gentry

says:

We’re still working on bd! I’m going to try some suggestions

Kelly Grundhofer

says:

Great reminders!

Chanel betts

says:

Thanks for the fun ideas

Tanya Montgomery

says:

Fun ideas!

Rhonda

says:

My daughter is a very kinesthetic leaner. Thanks for the poster of ideas!

Jill W

says:

Great activities for getting the wiggles out as well.

Jennifer

says:

I love these ideas and the multi sensory approach you have taken with AAR and AAS!

Elizabeth

says:

Such great ideas to help learning sink in!

Jennifer

says:

Great ideas!

Jennifer W

says:

My daughter learns best when she can use her sense of touch. The AAR letter tiles help so much!

Jessica S

says:

I think these kinesthetic activities are good reminders for me to keep learning active and engaging for little bodies that need to move. Thank you!

Beth Fortner

says:

Thanks for the ideas

Jessica

says:

So helpful for teaching my son spelling. Drilling doesn’t seem to work but arranging the letter tiles seems to make more sense to his brain.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jessica,
Great observation! This holds true for many students. Being able to touch and manipulate what they are learning makes a big difference in being able to master it.

Holly Lynd

says:

These are perfect for 2 of my hands on learners!

Allison

says:

Great ideas!

Lisha

says:

Thanks for the ideas. I need to get out of the rut.

May

says:

We’ve enjoyed using both All About Reading and Spelling in our homeschool. I have seen my son grow so much in his reading skills through this program and I love seeing my children practice what they have learned in spelling to read words and spell them. I thank you for the multi sensory ways you provide for our family to learn reading and spelling.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

May,
It is so amazing to be able to witness your children learning and mastering reading and spelling. I can understand why you love to see it!

Jessica

says:

Acting out the words. We love making a play out of them. When my daughter is able to add any kind of action to a word it locks the spelling of that word in her head.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jessica,
Acting out the words is such a great idea! It would help with understanding and retention and be great fun. Thanks for sharing this.

Lesley Campbell

says:

Many thanks for the information. I thought I had retired from teaching and had discarded all my resources. Now I have been asked to assist a 10 and 6 year old. with some special needs so will need to build up some more lessons. I used to get your newsletter until a couple of years ago.
Lesley in New Zealand

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lesley,
How wonderful that you can use your experience to help these children! And I’m happy that our resources can help you help them!

Would you like to get our newsletter again? I can sign you up.

Let me know if you need anything.

Lesley Campbell

says:

Thank you Robin. I would very much like to sign up again. I need all the help I can get!!
Regards
Lesley in New Zealand

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Okay, Lesley. I signed you up for our newsletter and you should have received a welcome email by now. If you have not, please check your spam folder. If you still don’t see it, please let me know.

Paige

says:

Thank you so much for this gem of a resource!

Amelia

says:

Play doh is a favorite in our house! We do so much with it.

Keri

says:

Thank you for the tips!0

Amber Knapp

says:

What great ideas!

Stephanie Schulenberg

says:

I love your resourses

Cathy Reilly

says:

I love these kinesthetic activities for practicing phonics. I especially like the beachball activity – I had used that concept to practice math facts, but hadn’t thought of using it for phonics. Thank you for all of these ideas!

Love the tips- thank you!

Kelli

says:

Creative ideas!

Amy

says:

Interesting!

krysti

says:

thanks for these tips. I am new to homeschooling and learning all over the place myself.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Krysti,
Good for you to be learning how to help your children learn! Please let me know if you have any questions or need anything.

Amy Rader

says:

This is such a great asset for helping a child that has dyslexia!

Carla

says:

I have a son who is a “mover and shaker” (ie He’s a kinesthetic learner, for sure!). AAS has really helped him grasp concepts that a visual learner may find easy to learn.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Carla,
All About Spelling is great for making difficult concepts clear and easy! I’m pleased to hear your son is doing so well with it.

Jana

says:

My auditory learner loves to spell out loud!

Lisa

says:

We love AAR and AAS! My kids asks to do school! :)

Amy M Smith

says:

Kinesthetic learning in AAS and AAR are great for my busy boy learner!

Blanca Mcquillan

says:

Thank you so very useful and exciting, and free…love that it’s easy.

Have a wonderful day
You made my day already🤗already ready to learn and grow with our kids

Julie Ber

says:

Great ideas!

Amy

says:

I love AAR for my kinesthetic learner!

Renae Gaffney

says:

Great ideas!

Heather

says:

Love these activities to try with my little ones.

Jeanie

says:

Thank you for all of your great ideas! I find so much on your website that I can use with my dyslexic students!

Erin Davis

says:

Great article! My oldest loves spelling his words while riding his bike. Every time he makes a lap, he has to spell the next word before he can pass me. We also do spelling practice where he has to hop from foot to foot while saying each letter of his spelling words, stamping his words, and rainbow writing his words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Such wonderful and very active ideas for spelling review! Thank you for sharing these, Erin. Sounds like you have a very active guy that is learning lots!

Kim Frey

says:

Thank you for your free resources! I was looking into All About Reading for our son, and when talking with his speech therapist about teaching phonics this coming year, she mentioned using the Orton-Gillingham approach! I had already been perusing your site, so I felt like I was a step ahead of the game!

Kim 😊

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kim,
It sounds like you are ahead of the game! 😊

Zorah

says:

I have used your play dough mats to teach letter recognition to my 2 year old. My 5 year old loves to skip and jump while reading and spelling. The tips above are awesome for kinesthetic learners.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Zorah,
What a great teacher you are to bring in so much hands-on and movement for your little learners! I’m glad you’ve found our playdough mats helpful too.

Madhavi Sriramoju

says:

I like the methods mentioned here. Another interesting way I found children like is to bake cakes or make pancakes in the shape of the letters or words

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Madhavi,
Baking is such a fun way to had hands-on to learning! We like to do cookies or pancakes in letters when my kids were little, but we did baking again when they were older as a way to practice multiplying and dividing fractions. Doubling or tripling a recipe is great practice for multiplying fractions and halving or quartering recipes is great to practice dividing fractions.

Thanks for sharing this idea!

Rachel

says:

I’ve used the b and d letter reversal activity with success for my kids! It’s nice to have that handy way to remember which is which.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rachel,
It’s great to hear that our activity on letter reversals helped your kids!

Anna Buys

says:

This is very exciting for me and the children. English is my second language and you open a new world to me. Thank you so much!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Anna,
You’re welcome! Many parents that aren’t native English speakers have successfully used All About Reading and All About Spelling with their children. Many have told us that using AAR and AAS have helped them to understand English better as well!

Let me know if you have any questions or ever need any help.

Carolina Gonzales

says:

I really like your topics and been useful in teaching primary grades. Your presentation is very clear and simple. Looking forward to adopt your reading program package when my budget becomes available

Ellen Theiss

says:

We have been doing AAR Level 2 and I love how they break things down! Hoping my daughter develops a love for reading yet! (or at least doesn’t hate it!)

What wonderful learning concepts! When I was a child – such concepts never existed – our generation of children truely have a lot of advances in their education needs.

JoAnna McConnell

says:

Thanks for sharing these fun ideas!

Lorraine Gilliam

says:

Thanks for the kinesthetic learning ideas. I love filing new ideas so I can frequently change up activities to make review more fun and engaging.

Yocheved

says:

I really appreciate the fact that you list a number of specific kinesthetic learning ideas. A few of them were new to me, such as beach ball catch, hide and seek and the “snowball” game. Thank you for the great ideas!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yocheved,
You’re welcome! I hope you enjoy many of these activities. The “snowball” one is especially fun on days when you’re stuck inside due to weather.

Katy

says:

Yes! More ideas—thank you for sharing them!

Cynthia

says:

Your activities are very creative and fun, and I look forward to trying them out with my students!

Kristin

says:

Thank you for this article.

Marion S

says:

Great ideas! Thanks for sharing!!

Amber

says:

Love the idea of scented, colored salt trays. I’m excited to try this out with both of my daughters!

Sylvia

says:

The kinesthetic component of AAR has turned reading lessons from an anxious, uphill battle into the favorite subject of the day. Thanks for these extra ideas and resources!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sylvia,
I love that AAR has helped make reading a favorite subject! Such a turn around in your home!

This is so vital to healthy learning! I’ve purchased levels 1 &2 and am wanting level 3 now.

sherlynka (sissy) Jones

says:

want to win the $100 gift certificate!!!!!!

Sarah

says:

Great Ideas! Thank you!

Meagan R.

says:

Oh, I love these activity ideas for kinesthetic learners!!

Laura

says:

These are really helpful ideas! Thanks for sharing :)

Tessa

says:

These are such great ideas! A few of them seem obvious, but when you’re in the thick of your day you just don’t think of it. Getting them out of the house and into the yard can feel like a disruption to the day, but in actuality you are increasing everyone’s mood and helping your kids retain more knowledge! Thanks!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tessa,
Great point! Sometimes stopping the seat work to get up and do something activity can seem like it will be a disruption and will stop the learning, but often it does the opposite.

Julie

says:

Love all these ideas!!

Jenn

says:

I love how all of the activities really keep my child’s interest and don’t allow her to become bored!

Sarah D

says:

Good ctivitoes and relatively simple!

Sushi P

says:

i found all the activities very interesting.Thak you very much

Carol

says:

These are excellent ideas. Thanks for sharing.

Teresa

says:

I have a 9yr.old with APD. Learning to read was such a struggle, he hated it.He would literally punch himself in the head & say this stupid brain.Since I discovered AAR & AAS my son loves to read & spell.Now we have the problem of not wanting to move on with other subjects.I have to say it is a good problem to have.I have tears of joy in my eyes as I write this reflecting on how far he has come.We are now half way through level 4 and I feel that his reading is actually advanced (if we were to compare).My son went from hating to read to wanting to be a librarian so he can be around books all day.Be encouraged mamas.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Oh, Teresa, this is such an amazing change! I almost teared up imagining your son saying, “this stupid brain,” but I did smile hugely at him now wanting to be a librarian. Thank you for sharing this, and keep up the amazing work!

Lauren S

says:

I’ve experienced teachers that refused anything overtly kinesthetic and insisted kids must always maintain eye contact and keep hands in the lap until activity time. How sad! These are all fabulous ideas to keep kids engaged and interested!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lauren,
I have seen posters aimed at kids that say good listeners do exactly that, that they always look directly at the speaker and keep their hands still. Yet I’ve known so many adults that can’t focus if they do that, so why would we expect it from children? Movement helps learning, regardless of age!

Tammy Matthews

says:

Thanks this helps a bunch

Carrie

says:

Thanks for all the great ideas.

Liz

says:

I am loving everything that I have purchased so far from All About Learning Press. I love that you keep educating parents as well to help us better teach our children and support them in their learning. As a former public school teacher I am well versed in the kinesthetic learning, but it was exciting to see in your idea list the mention of Wikki Stix! My daughter just received some in a party goodie bag. She is just learning her letters with your Pre- Reading Level. I had not thought to use this gift to help her with her letters. What perfect timing! Thanks for the idea!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Liz,
What amazing timing that you would just happen to have Wiki Stix on newly on hand! Wiki Stix are a lot of fun and are a great, low-mess way to review letters, spelling, and more. I hope you have a lot of fun learning letters with them.

April Hawkins

says:

These are great ideas! Thanks for having a printable PDF!

Layci

says:

Great ideas! I look forward to trying these ideas with my kids. Thank you!

Jana

says:

Thank you for the ideas!

Cindy

says:

This is really helpful. My son has loved the activity part of each lesson.

Emily

says:

Its enjoyable finding new way to teach my children. The information I have found on this post and through out the site are very helpful.

Shannon S.

says:

These will be great to use during the summer to keep skills strong!

Lisa

says:

Thank you so much. Your materials and blogs have been so helpful this year as we started a new homeschool journey with our bonus family of differently abled children.

Breanna

says:

The fact that this program used a multi sensory approach is exactly what made us choose it for our Homeschool! My son just started the Pre-Level a few weeks ago and is breezing right through it when previous attempts ended in tears and frustration. He is so proud of himself and has gained a tremendous amount of confidence! Best of all, he is ENJOYING himself and looks forward to reading time each day.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Breanna,
I am so happy to hear that the Pre-reading level is working so well for your son, but even more excited to know that he is enjoying it and looking forward to each day’s work! Learning that is fun results in much better retention!

Cindy

says:

Such easily doable kinesthetic activities to try without much prep. Also great to share with parents who want to help at home!

Laurie

says:

It’s great to have all of these suggestions in one place. Thanks!

E Rolicheck

says:

We love this program. My daughter was struggling with reading before we found AAR. She just finished level 1 and is whizzing through level 2. But, the best part of all is she is choosing to read on her own. She just told me the other day —“I love to read. It is so fun.” We went from a struggling child to a child I know is now hooked on reading.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

What a wonderful change! Thank you for sharing your daughter success in reading with us. Keep up the amazing work!

Megan

says:

I love the ideas on the Kinesthetic Activities Poster!

Carrie Woodruff

says:

My kids love writing their spelling words in salt. To involve more senses, I color the salt purple and add lavender.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Carrie,
Writing in salt trays is such a great activity, and adding the color and scent makes it even more special! Great idea. Thanks for sharing it.

Frances Weldon,SLP

says:

I love ❤️ all your wonderful post and creative ideas that help to inspire my students.

Roxy

says:

Great ideas. Can’t wait to try a few.

Paula

says:

Hope you use some of these this summer.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Paula,
Most of these would be great ideas for summer review! However, we have another blog post about summer review that can give you even more ideas, How to Beat the Summer Slide. Let me know if you have any questions or want even more ideas!

Machelle

says:

Thanks so much for these ideas

Mistie

says:

This is why we love AAS!

Erin Hoskins

says:

Can’t wait to try some of these amazing ideas with my kids!!

Carol Fye

says:

My Daughter and I will try some of these. Thanks!

Heather

says:

My preschooler’s Sunday School teacher has started having them say their Bible verse while playing hopscotch. We’ve all been amazed at how quickly they pick up the verse & how long they retain it.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Heather,
It sounds like your child’s Sunday School teacher is definitely on to something! :D

Lacey

says:

Thank you for these great ideas! Review is definitely one of the dreaded activities in my house, but these ideas will make it so fun!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lacey,
I’m sorry to hear review is so dreaded in your house. It is one of those things that kids seem to either love or hate. They may love it as it allows them to go over what they already know, so it’s easier. Or they may hate it because it’s either boring or they find it hard to remember what they are reviewing. Using games and activities can help the kids that find review boring, but if your child doesn’t like review because he or she finds it hard to remember, then reviewing more often may help. By reviewing more frequently, maybe even for a few minutes each day, the concepts stay fresh and review becomes easy.

Please let me know if you would like more ideas on how to make review more pleasant for your household. I’d love to help!

Lacey

says:

Thanks Robin! Some of my kiddos don’t mind it at all, but I have one who is a very right-brained learner who does find it hard to remember words and some of the spelling rules. AAS definitely does well for her — and she is making great progress — but she often ends up with a lot of review words. She does well with the spelling when in the “spelling test” situation, but makes mistakes on them when getting them in dictations or “real-world” writing situations later on. So…back on the list they go. I find that reviewing them often helps her to fix them in her mind, but she often complains about doing them. :(

Jody R.

says:

I love “playing catch” while teaching my kids new concepts. It really helps them to stayed more interested in the material I’m teaching them and retain it better

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jody,
Playing catch is a great way to keep your kids focused and interested! Thank you for sharing this idea.

Naomi Sullivan

says:

These are amazing and will be so helpful for my active 7 year old! Thanks so much!

Yvette

says:

Love these ideas for my soon to be preschooler!

Anita

says:

very helpful to learn about the different ways your kid can learn!

Emily Tei

says:

My daughter is 11 and in year 6. She was diagnosed with asperges syndrome with ADHD when she was 3 in the UK. We moved to Ghana around the same time and her reading, spelling and writing is of a year 3 child.
Her imagination somewhat seems limited hence she cannot write meaningful essays and struggles with comprehension exercises. On the other hand, she excels in science, math and french. Her concentration and focus in class is non-existent. She requires constant prompting as a result I have had to sit in class with her 3 days a week.
At home teaching her subjects such creative writing, comprehension always ends up in tantrums or tears. How can I help her???

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Emily,
First, I think you may find our blog post on Teaching Reading and Spelling to Autistic Children helpful.

Development of all the different aspects of language follows a natural progression. You can see a flowchart showing this progression in this blog post on Language Arts in My Household. Asking a student to work on creative writing and higher level comprehension when she is still at the beginning levels of reading and spelling is jumping ahead of the natural progression. She needs to become proficient in reading and spelling first, and only then work on creative writing. Comprehension problems are usually related to not being proficient in reading, so it is likely building her reading skills will improve her comprehension problems without other work.

Here are some ways that All About Reading and All About Spelling can help kids with learning difficulties:

– Each lesson time is simple and explicit and will include 3 simple steps: the review of what was learned the day before, a simple new teaching, and a short practice of that new teaching.

– Incremental lessons. AAR and AAS break every teaching down into its most basic steps and then teach the lessons in a logical order, carrying students from one concept or skill to the next. Each step builds on what the student has already mastered.

– AAR and AAS are multisensory. Research has shown that when a child is taught through all three pathways at the same time, a method known as simultaneous multisensory instruction, he will learn significantly more than when taught only through his strongest pathway.

– AAR and AAS use specially color-coded letter tiles. Working with the letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept.

– AAR and AAS are scripted so you can concentrate on your child. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage.

– AAR and AAS have built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning difficulties generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. With AAR and AAS, your child will have a Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows.

– All About Reading has lots of fluency practice. One of the things that Marie noticed when she was researching reading programs is that few programs have enough review built in for kids who struggle to gain fluency. AAR has fluency sheets or a story to be read with every lesson, so children can practice reading smoothly with expression and confidence.

– All About Spelling has a gradual progression for increasing the student’s stamina and fluency in writing, from words and short phrases in Level 1, to phrases and short sentences in Level 2, to 12 dictation sentences per step in Level 3. Partway through Level 3, the Writing Station activity is introduced. In this exercise, students write sentences of their own that they make up using some of their spelling words. In this way students have begun to use words in a more real-world context through dictation and writing, to help them transition to longer writing assignments.

All About Reading and All About Spelling have a one-year guarantee. You can try them, and if for any reason you feel that they aren’t the right match for your child, return them for a full refund.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have additional questions.

Emily Tei

says:

Thank you

Evelyn

says:

if the child is not interested in participating in thses activities,how am I supposed to get them there.please help

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Evelyn,
Great question.

Often presenting two or three options to your child can help motivate him or her to participate. “We are going to work on learning letters. Would you like to sit and do flashcards, smack flashcards with this swatter, or jump on the trampoline while I show you flashcards?” Knowing the work has to be done but being allowed a say in how it is done can be very motivating.

How old is your child? What sort of work is your child not interested in doing and what have you tried? Consider the goal is learning, not how they learn. Some children prefer a no-nonsense, no-play approach. If your child is like that, it is fine to not go out of your way to do kinesthetic activities he or she doesn’t enjoy.

I hope this helps some. Please let us know if you have further questions.

Allie rangel

says:

How do I find out how my son learns?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Allie,
It is less important to find what learning style your son learns best with, and more important to provide opportunities for him to learn using all learning styles. Research shows that when students learn using all three learning senses (sight, sound, and touch) they learn better than just learning through their best style alone. We discuss this further in our blog post on Multisensory Teaching.

Asma

says:

My son traces the letter by touching the letter while doing abc puzzle.Does that mean Kinesthetic technique will help him?Also I notice he learn seeing pictures and hearing the words. He remembers physical activities like ring a ring a rosy.Any advice will help. He is three years old.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Asma,
All small children are wired to learn from kinesthetic and tactile experiences. It is the primary way they interpret their world. However, research strongly shows that all people learn best when they learn through all three modes of learning, sight, sound, and touch, at the same time. We discuss this further in our blog post on Multisensory Teaching.

We have many blog posts, including numerous free downloads and activities, on teaching preschoolers.

Asma

says:

Thansk for answering my question. Does this learning style apply to all kids even the kids with ASD?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Asma,
Yes. Children on the autism spectrum do need to approach learning through sight, sound, and touch just as much or more than other students. We have a blog post specifically about Teaching Reading and Spelling to Autistic Children.

Andrea Wenger

says:

Just started using this program and really enjoy teaching it! Like these ideas!

Rachel

says:

Incorporating sketches helps keep my artistic child engaged. I have been known to have a kinesthetic learner do push-ups for each letter of the word! 😄

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rachel,
Doing push-ups for each letter of a word sounds a bit like basic training! However, I do know some kids that would enjoy that sort of thing.

Kristy

says:

We have been using AAS for 2 years. It is very helpful for my son who is struggling with reading and writing.

Virginia

says:

Thanks for the info. Always so helpful

Jenny Meyer

says:

All About Spelling has completely changed our homeschooling experience. Our old curriculum had my son in tears every day. There are no tears with All About Spelling. My son actually enjoys it!
I can not say enough good things about this program!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jenny,
We are so happy to hear that All About Spelling has removed the tears!

Jennifer Norton

says:

We have had so much success with AAS! These spelling tips come in handy!

Jennifer Norton

says:

We have had so much success with AAS! Thanks for these wonderful tips!

Nancy

says:

All three of my kids like kinetic sand.

Brenda

says:

Thank you for all the great tips and ideas!

Ruth

says:

Wonderful Suggestions! With three boys these will get a lot of use.

Melissa

says:

This is exactly what my son needs!

jamie

says:

Thanks for the great suggestions!

Sharon

says:

Fun ideas!

Jasmine

says:

These are great ideas!

Jessica Robinson

says:

I love this idea. My youngest is definitely a multi-sensory learner and we will be trying several of these ideas to see if this is the right way to go to help my struggling 1st grader. I have seen positive posts regarding this program! Thanks!

Carrie

says:

Great activities for my very active boys! I love this program – learning the spelling rules is every so more important than learning lists of words by memorization.

Maria

says:

Great!

Jen

says:

I love how this program allowed me to slow down and step by step help me teach my son how to read stress free.

Kerrie

says:

Awesome program

Melissa McKinney

says:

Love this article! Thank you!

Jessica Bush

says:

Great ideas! Thanks! Kinesthetic learning is a great eperiemtial way for spelling mastery!

Renae B

says:

Using hands on learning has made it possible to complete lessons in our house with two active boys.

Sandi

says:

My daughter always does well spelling words outloud when jumping on the trampoline!

Carole K.

says:

I love this program. My kids like the multicolored tiles, which are a nice change from typical spelling bookwork.

Calista Smith

says:

Hands-on learning is just magical… I learn best that way as well. We love using the magnetic board and letter tiles, and enjoy the extra activities you suggest as well. Thank you for lending your creativity to our homeschool!

Laura

says:

Would love to be able to try this program with a couple of my students.

Susie Taylor

says:

The kinesthetic part is great for my son’s learning and so fun!

Sara

says:

I have begun doing simple obstacle courses that include somersaults, cartwheels, & our climber, in which our kiddo has to pick out cards that make the sound I assign at the start of the course. I included the cereal-box feed-the-puppy idea from this site, so she feeds the puppy her card at the end. She thinks it’s a blast!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sara,
Oh, my! This sounds so exciting. It’s PE and phonics in one lesson!

Shauna

says:

Loving new and different idas.Such good advice!

Shauna

says:

Such good advice!

Rachel

says:

My son used to love swimming his letters in the pool. He was an early swimmer and was learning the alphabet at the same time as learning to swim. He’d swim a letter and have me guess which one it was.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rachel,
I’ve never heard of swimming as a way to learn letters, but it sounds like it would be super fun!

Jessica

says:

My kids are very kinesthetic learners, so I appreciate all the multi sensory approach, the extra activity ideas in your blogs and the flexibility of the program! I have one child doing AAS1 right now, one on AAS2 and one very slowly working through AAR1. :)

Julie Hudson

says:

I love the multisensory approach! We have also used a plastic container with colored sand from the dollar tree to write in or window markers!:-)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great kinesthetic writing ideas, Julie! Thanks for sharing them.

Christie S.

says:

This is great. I am a kinesthetic learner, and I wish someone would have figured it out when I was in school!

Sara

says:

This is our first year using AAS and AAR in our homeschool. We love it! At times I have to be flexible with my kindergarten aged son (who is doing the pre-reading AAR level) because he is very much a wiggly boy. Many days we’ve had to take the lesson outside to the trampoline, jumping syllables or even just letting him jump while I read.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sara,
I love how you have incorporated your trampoline into your reading lessons. Sounds like fun!

Michaella Humphrey

says:

I have All About Spelling on my curriculum list for next year. We are so excited about this program!

Christi B

says:

Great ideas! We use a ball to bounce around to learn letters and numbers

Michelle

says:

My son is 4.5 years old. When he 1St turned 4 we began the following activity. I took single stacking mega/duplo blocks & wrote a letter on each block. All vowels were done on same color blocks. Constants were put on any other colors. We then hid the entire alphabet of blocks out in the yard somewhat in the open. (Object was to find them relatively easily & quickly.) He would run around & find the blocks. Each time he found a block he brought it to me, told me the name of the letter, sound it made & a word that started with that letter. He had already mastered 90+% of his letters & sounds before we began this game. So after I was sure he had mastered them all we added a new level to the game. We no longer hid the vowels. Instead, after he found a few letters (doing the earlier steps with each) we began using the new letters to create 3 letter words that he chose & helped to create. He LOVES playing this game! The joy on his face when he’s able to make words on his own is equivalent to that of Christmas morning & he’s having fun while he learns. We are making priceless memories playing together, he’s learning and we are both having fun while we do it!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
What a wonderful game you have created! It sounds like so much fun, learning, social fun, lots of running around, it has it all! Thank you for sharing this with us here.

Jeneen

says:

I am a kinesthetic learner and retain information much better when learned interactively. Glad to see this post!

Melissa

says:

Even though I have a bouncy boy who can’t sit still and does have a high kinesthetic learning bent, he often wants to know why we’re doing activities like these. Does that more likely mean that he has mastered the material or that I just need to find different kinesthetic activities?

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Melissa,

It could be, or it could be he just wants to understand. Does he know why he’s doing them? I found it often helped my kids if they understood the importance of various activities. How old is your son, and which types of activities does he tend to question (specific lessons in AAR or AAS, or just reading in general)?

Beth Beguerie

says:

the ideas on this website are amazing! I can’t wait to try them!

Nancy

says:

I’ve tried to do some kinesthetic activities for my visual learner. We’ve gone outside to write with chalk — which, along with providing more well rounded learning, was a nice change of pace. We’ve done soap in a bag and sand — which eventually ended up all over my carpet. Oh well.

Merry at AALP

says:

Some that my kids enjoyed at 9 and 11:

Letter tiles
writing on different surfaces to change things up (white board, gel pens on black paper, colored markers, sidewalk chalk outside, finger in sand or snow, air writing, finger on carpet squares…oh, writing on glass or mirrors–some kids love that!)

If we were reviewing words that we’d already studied, I let my kids call out the spelling orally, but if they made a mistake or weren’t sure, I had them write the word. It’s important for kids to be fluent in writing the words so that they can be fluent in writing.

If you have a trampoline or mini-tramp, let him call out spellings as he jumps.

If you have a basketball hoop, let him shoot a basket after he correctly spells a word out loud to you.

Some kids like to type their review words.

Level 1 has an exercise where kids jump from letter to letter to work on segmenting. My oldest used to like to jump from square to square to spell words. If you have a tile floor with squares, you could set a letter in each one for him to jump as he spells the words. This is a way of adapting this activity on identifying letters from our post on using refrigerator magnets: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/8-ways-refrigerator-magnets/

He might like the fishing idea in that one and could fish for the letter tiles he needs too.

Similar to this–lay out tiles or phonogram cards and let him swat the letters as he spells the word, as a variation on this activity: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/swatting-phonograms/

This article might have a few more ideas for you: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/how-to-use-kinesthetic-spelling-activities

Hope this gives you some ideas!

Linda B.

says:

I need more ideas for older kids that are a little farther along than writing letters. I have one that can’t sit still.

Wendy Butler

says:

Linda B.–One thing that we have done in our home with an 11 year-old boy with learning disabilities (who is incredibly bright, but difficult to engage) is to write the material we are covering on the backs of foam plates. Then attach 3 or 4 of the plates side-by-side. You can do this at a younger age with letters, shapes, and numbers, or at an older age with answer options to a specific question (i.e. What year did the Civil War end?) I have them use a nerf gun and shoot the right answer on the “target.” I haven’t had a complaint about this activity from any of my 4 children. :)

Becky

says:

Very helpful!

Carla

says:

Such great and fun ideas! Thank you

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