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Word Flippers

word flippers featured graphic

Have you seen our Word Flippers?

Word Flippers are a super popular part of the All About Reading program. They are fun and motivating for kids, and a simple-yet-effective tool for you as the teacher.

Word Flippers reinforce all sorts of reading concepts, such as simple CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant) words, words with consonant suffixes, and more advanced words such as proficient and thankfully.

There are more than seventy-five Word Flippers included in levels 1-4 of the All About Reading program.

Is your curiosity piqued yet? Keep reading to learn more about these fun learning tools.

Using Word Flippers

All you need is an activity sheet, a pair of scissors, and a stapler. In a matter of minutes, your Word Flippers are ready to go.

As your child flips through the pages, he can visualize the changes that occur when single or multiple letters are replaced. There’s just something fun about these mini booklets!

closeup of boy playing with a word flipper

The Word Flipper pictured in this post comes from All About Reading Level 2, Lesson 8. In this lesson, the student learns how to read words with three-letter blends such as S-C-R as in scrap. After practicing the concept with letter tiles, we use the Word Flipper to provide even more practice and to build fluency. Word Flippers can be used again and again to review and reinforce previously learned rules and patterns.

boy playing with a word flipper

Now It’s Your Turn!

Download the Word Flippers for “Three-Letter Blends”, along with 12 more sample Word Flippers from All About Reading Levels 1-4.

Word Flippers from Levels 1-4 3-page spread

Give them a try and let me know how your child likes them!

Photo credit: Rachel Neumann

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Leslie

says:

How do I purchase the whole pack of word flippers. I was looking on the website, I feel like I am probably just missing it or something.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Leslie,
The Word Flippers aren’t available as a separate set for purchase. There is a download on this blog post that includes many of them, but the rest are included in our Activity Books for each level of All About Reading. I’m sorry for the confusion about that.

J. Vaughn

says:

What a fantastic resource! Thank you for making it available to us all :)

Rebecca

says:

These look like so much fun!

Jess

says:

My son loved these!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for letting us know that your son enjoyed these, Jess!

Cindy

says:

This sounds very interesting , and I would love to try.

Heather

says:

I love this approach!

Amy

says:

My kids love these!

Nicole G

says:

My kids love the word flippers.

Candace

says:

I have loved using this approach with some of my children over the years! Once they learn that one common sound, it builds such encouragement to realize how many more words they can read easily in the “word family”.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great point, Candace! And word flippers and similar activities not only encourage kids with any many words they can read, but it also helps build fluency in their reading. It’s all apart of Thinking Approach to Word Families.

Tara E

says:

Love this idea!

Linny Duran

says:

These are really great! Instead of just reading out of a book or a page, the interactive learner is turning the pages and getting new words to sound out. This reinforces phonics and coding skills in a fun way.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great points, Linny! Thank you.

Juana

says:

Instead of just reading words on plain paper it’s also an activity my kids like making booklets that they made so much more fun and meaningful to them.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

So true, Juana!

Lisa

says:

My son enjoyed doing these!

Alyson C

says:

What a great idea!

Cheri Low

says:

Fun and easy to use! Thanks for sharing!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Cheri!

Jean Tremmel

says:

This is an amazing site with so many educational options to choose from

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Jean! I’m pleased you are finding helpful things here.

Steve W.

says:

My kids (8 and 7) really enjoy setting up the word flippers and we love how they help the kids breakdown the words. All About Reading is a great program and a truly complete MSL program.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m glad your kids enjoy the word flippers, Steve! It’s great to hear that All About Reading is working out so well for them.

vanessa

says:

how can I get the full set of flipper books, not just the samples

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Vanessa,
The flipper books are included in each level of All About Reading in the Activity Book for that level. The only way to get a full set of them would be to get a full set of All About Reading Activity Books levels 1 through 4.

Sandi E

says:

These are great! Very easy to use and great resource.

Tanya Skokan

says:

This is great. Thanks for sharing. It is incredibly valuable to have great resources for children like that.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Tanya! Let me know if you need anything else.

Angelica

says:

Amazing resource

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Angelica!

Mary Nysten

says:

Thank you so much for sharing your resources with us.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Mary!

Julie

says:

good evening- how do you teach a grade 6 kinesthetic dyslexic to spell difficult words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Julie,
Learning to spell difficult words happens as students learn the phonograms, rules, and patterns that make up simpler words. For example, we find that many students simply memorize easy words like “cat” and “kid” but have no idea why one uses a C and the other uses a K, or that the same rules that apply to these words also apply to higher-level words such as “concentrate.”

If your student has a pretty good foundation in phonograms, rules, and patterns of easier words, then you can approach harder words by analyzing them together to help your student learn to think through spelling. Together you would look over a word and ask and answer questions about its spelling, such as:
– What letters are used to spell each sound?
– Are there any spelling rules that apply?
– How many syllables are there?
– What types of syllables are they?
– If there is a Silent E, what is its job?
– Is there a suffix or prefix?
– If there is an /er/ sound, how it is spelled?
– and so on

If your student wouldn’t be able to answer questions like these about a word even with help, he or she would benefit from All About Spelling. You would find our blog post Using All About Spelling with Older Students helpful.

Please let me know if you have any questions or need help with placement or anything else.

Trina M. Allen

says:

Thank you! I’m teaching Title 1 Reading this year and these tips are awesome!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Trina! I’m glad these are helpful for your teaching.

Alisa Kagen

says:

This is awesome!!!

Yvonne Kringle

says:

Im going to trial this with my PSG student. I love the idea

Monique

says:

Love your resources they are great.I am in Australia so if i ever visit england would love to meet you as literacy is my passion.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Monique,
I’m happy to hear you enjoy our resources!

However, All About Learning Press is located in the United States of America, not England. However, our products are used by English speakers and teachers all over the world, including England and Australia. Let me know if you have any questions about literacy or anything else.

Angela

says:

Hello Marie,
Thank you for all your wonderful resources. They are amazing and invaluable for both teachers and parents alike. I would like to purchase everything but cannot afford at the moment. I will just be working with the samples that you have so kindly provided and explore, trying them out with learners. The other point is that I am a part-time UK based teacher. Do you have a UK version? as some of the spellings may be American. Well done for sharing so much. Greatly appreciated. Best wishes Angela, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Angela,
We do not have a version that focuses on British spelling; however, numerous people around the world that use British spelling use our programs. Teachers and parents adjust for the few spelling differences as they teach. One New Zealand mom told us, “In fact my daughter learnt those words easier because they became discussion points!”

You might like this blog review from an Australian mom who completed all 7 levels with one of her children.

We’ve received suggested alterations from a few different customers for those using British spelling/pronunciation. Sometimes North Americans need to make slight alterations based on regional pronunciation as well, so we recommend making changes that are helpful to you and your students. Very few spelling words actually need to be changed. Some people will just omit them, and others might choose to teach that word with the British spelling.

If you are interested, we have a document that outlines the changes needed for teaching British spelling with All About Spelling.

We do have a UK distributor as well, Conquest Books.

Please let me know if you have further questions.

Isaac

says:

Hello, I am a teacher in Japan. I am currently trying to improve the reading, writing, listening, and speaking of my students. I found your website and decided to give your word flipper a try. It looks to have a lot of promise! I can’t wait to see how my studnets react to this activity!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Isaac,
We would love to hear how your English learning students do with the word flippers and how much, if at all, they enjoy them!

Tina

says:

We are doing AAR1 L26 with beginning blends. Do you have any other games/suggestions other than flippers? I know he will get it with repetition; I was just looking for more fun especially with ones without flippers (bl,br,cl,cr,sc,sk,tr). Thanks.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tina,
It’s actually pretty common for kids to have more trouble once they hit consonant blends, especially at the beginning of a word. These are just harder for them and take more practice than the easier bits of reading that they started with. You can do the switch-out tiles activities–here are examples with beginning blends:

pot-lot-blot-scot-trot-tram-scam-cram
lip-blip-clip-clap-lap-lad-clad-brad
sip-skip-drip-drop-crop–clop-cop-cob-rob-rib-crib
rag-brag-lag-flag-flap-rap-trap

Just do a short switch-out activity each day to help him work on this. If he wants to try to switch out letters and make words for you to read, let him! Hearing you sound out words (even if they are nonsense words), will help him with blending.

Another thing that you can do that’s fun: (First the parent demonstrates this, and then the child mimics.) Lay 4 sheets of colored paper on the floor. Write one letter on each sheet of paper, like P-L-A-N. Jump on the first paper and say /c/. Jump on the second paper and say /lllll/. Jump on the third paper and say /aaaaa/. Jump on the fourth paper and say /p/. Then start over, and do it quicker. Finally, run across the papers and say “CLAP!”

You can do a similar game with phonogram cards on the table. Let your son run a race car over them as he blends the sounds into words.

Another helpful thing is to play oral blending games. You say the sounds of a word you are thinking of, and then he blends them into a word. Can he guess a word that you mean if you just say the sounds? Do easy 3-sound words first if needed, then add in words with blends. This is a game that can help develop his blending skills. If he can blend orally, then he is on his way to being able to blend what he reads.

There are a lot of ideas for fun ways to review with the word cards, or index cards, on this blog post.

Hopefully, he will have mastered beginning blends by the time he has tired of these ideas, but if you need more just ask.

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