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Word Flippers

word flippers featured graphic

Have you seen our Word Flippers?

Word Flippers are a super popular part of the All About Reading program. They are fun and motivating for kids, and a simple-yet-effective tool for you as the teacher.

Word Flippers reinforce all sorts of reading concepts, such as simple CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant) words, words with consonant suffixes, and more advanced words such as proficient and thankfully.

There are more than seventy-five Word Flippers included in levels 1-4 of the All About Reading program.

Is your curiosity piqued yet? Keep reading to learn more about these fun learning tools.

Using Word Flippers

All you need is an activity sheet, a pair of scissors, and a stapler. In a matter of minutes, your Word Flippers are ready to go.

As your child flips through the pages, he can visualize the changes that occur when single or multiple letters are replaced. There’s just something fun about these mini booklets!

closeup of boy playing with a word flipper

The Word Flipper pictured in this post comes from All About Reading Level 2, Lesson 8. In this lesson, the student learns how to read words with three-letter blends such as S-C-R as in scrap. After practicing the concept with letter tiles, we use the Word Flipper to provide even more practice and to build fluency. Word Flippers can be used again and again to review and reinforce previously learned rules and patterns.

boy playing with a word flipper

Now It’s Your Turn!

Download the Word Flippers for “Three-Letter Blends”, along with 12 more sample Word Flippers from All About Reading Levels 1-4.

Word Flippers from Levels 1-4 3-page spread

Give them a try and let me know how your child likes them!

Photo credit: Rachel Neumann

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Chanel

says:

Word flippers are games changers in breaking down word families. We love this activity

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Glad you enjoy this, Chanel!

Felicia Mckibben

says:

These are my daughters favorite activity! I find they build confidence in her and build fluency.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I love that the word flippers are helping to build your daughter’s confidence in reading, Felicia!

Seanne

says:

Great addition! Thank you!

Amy Bloyer

says:

Word flippers really help work towards automaticity.

Maria Ayala

says:

My family has loved Word Flippers! They’re fun and easy to use and my kids have learned so much from using them!

Stephanie Harvey

says:

My kids love building the words then flipping through them.

Kristina Mooney

says:

My daughter and I love word flippers! The first time we used them she flipped through and read them all twice. It’s a fun way to practice reading!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I love that the word flippers encouraged your daughter to do extra practicing, Kristina!

Bev Kolanek

says:

This is a great idea!

Sarah

says:

The word flippers are a favorite here!

Rosa

says:

My son saves his favorite word flippers even after they are mastered! :)

Dana

says:

Love these from the activity books—very helpful!

Chelsie Ashley

says:

The word flippers are one of our favorite activities! My kids love constructing them and reading them. 😊

Amanda

says:

We have a bunch of fun with word flippers but recommend setting up well before you start as it can take a few minutes to cut out and build them.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for the tip, Amanda! Helpful.

Megan

says:

What a great and fun way to learn!

Megan

says:

This is such a great idea and looks fun!

Shannon Culp

says:

My son enjoyed these little booklets.

Cherie Tuck

says:

I love these! So helpful when kids are learning for blends.. genius & easy to set up!

Mary Lusk

says:

We are currently using All About Reading level 1, and my son loves the word flippers. Thank you!

atiyyah kaleem

says:

my child loves the word flippers

Cassie Monson

says:

Great idea! I enjoy all the different ways to teach the lessons

Lisa Parker

says:

What a good idea!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thanks, Lisa!

Crystal Cohen

says:

This looks like it will be so much fun!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Crystal!

Michele Ann Mobley

says:

My son loved this approach. He was excited to read these books to me. Thank you for equipping parents to teach their struggling learners.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Michele Ann. I’m glad to hear that this approach was a good one for your son!

Kayla Metcalf

says:

We love the word flippers. Such a fun activity!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Kayla!

Natalie Smith

says:

We love Word Flippers in my household!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great to hear, Natalie!

Ashley

says:

I love the word flippers! My daughter does so well with them too during our lessons.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m pleased to hear the word flippers work well for your daughter, Ashley!

Tracey

says:

We love All About Spelling and books like the word flippers has really helped associate the sounds to the letters.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great to hear it, Tracey! Thank you.

Jess

says:

My kids love the word flippers

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Wonderful, Jess! Thank you.

Annamari

says:

I have grade 6 dyslexia child battling with au , when do word end with sion or tion sound the same and when is it ou or au sound do you have any word flippers on it or what would you recommend

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Annamari,
No, we don’t have word flippers for these topics.

Sion and tion usually don’t give children difficulties in reading; they are usually problems with spelling. Is this the case for your child? We cover this in Level 5 of All About Spelling, as it is a more advanced concept. Some generalizations will help.

First, if the root word ends in T, use tion. Object-objections
Second, if the word ends in “/ā/-/shŭn/” like information, use A then tion.
Third, if the root word ends in the sound /s/, use sion. Confess-confession.
Lastly, some words don’t have root words and don’t have “/ā/-/shŭn/.” You will need to simply learn these words. Motion and vision, for example.

The first two of these generalizations are available in the sample lessons of All About Spelling Level 5. Look at Step 3. The following two are covered in Step 5 of that level, but that step is not included in the sample.

As for when to use OU and when to use AU, these two phonograms do not share any sounds. If your child masters the sounds these phonograms make, the confusion should disappear. Does the child know that AU says /aw/ and that OU says /ow/-/ō/-/ōō/-/ŭ/? We have a How to Teach Phonograms blog post that will speak all the sounds of the phonograms for you, plus has downloadable games for practicing the sound.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Erica

says:

My 8-year-old really likes these.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lovely to hear that your child enjoys the word flippers, Erica! Thank you.