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Helping Kids Sound Out Words

When you read, you probably don’t spend much time decoding the individual words. You just read, and as you get to each word, you instantly recognize it. But beginning readers don’t have that kind of instant recall, so it is important to teach them how to sound out words.

What Does “Sounding Out Words” Mean?

When you sound out a word, you say each sound in the word slowly (s…i…t), and then say the sounds together more quickly (sit). The technical term for this process is blending because sounds are blended together to form a word. Here’s a quick demo:

Why Is Sounding Out (or Blending) Important?

When a child can say the sounds of the letters in the order in which they appear, and can then blend those sounds into a recognizable word, she is able to read thousands of phonetically regular words.

Because it unlocks so many words, blending is an important step toward the goal of reading comprehension. In fact, research shows that learning to sound out words has a powerful effect on reading comprehension.1

Arrow graphic showing blending as a step toward  the goal of reading comprehension

What Kids Should Know before Sounding Out Words

Before you attempt to teach your child to sound out words, check to see if he is ready. Here’s a free Reading Readiness Checklist for you to download.

Download graphic for Reading Readiness Checklist - click to download

After you’ve used the checklist to ensure that your child is prepared to learn to read, it’s time to teach the letter-sound correspondences of several letters of the alphabet. The letters M, S, P, and A are a good place to start because the sounds are easy to pronounce and several interesting words can be formed right away.

Graphic showing that with the sounds of a few letters kids can read words!

Before we get into the four easy steps for teaching blending, let’s discuss a problem that many beginning readers encounter. Recognizing this problem will help you better understand the steps for blending.

Short-term Memory Issues Can Affect Blending

When kids first learn how to decode three-letter words, they have to juggle several cognitive processes simultaneously:

  • They must recognize the letters.
  • They must retrieve the sounds of those letters.
  • They must hold all three sounds in the memory while they sound out the word.

There is a lot going on in their brains! In fact, it is very common for beginning readers to have difficulty with standard blending procedures. Just about anyone who has taught blending has encountered a situation like this:

Comic strip showing that short-term memory issues can affect blending.

What just happened there? Here’s the problem: by the time the child got to the third letter, he had forgotten the sounds of the first two letters, and then had to resort to guessing. But it’s not that kids can’t remember three things in a row—it’s just that there are too many competing processes going on in their heads at once.

It’s easy to understand the problem. But what can we do to help?

“Cumulative Blending” Solves this Problem

Cumulative blending is quite simple. Start by building a phonetically regular word with letter tiles and then follow the steps below. We’ll demonstrate with the word map.

  1. Touch one letter at a time and say the sound of each letter.
Blending the sounds m-a-p into the word map-Step 1
  1. Go back to the beginning of the word and blend the first two sounds together.
  1. Start over at the beginning of the word. Slide your finger under the letters and blend all three sounds together.
  1. Finally, say the word at a normal pace, as we do when we speak.

This is called cumulative blending because there are successive additions of the letter sounds. First we blend the first two sounds (/mă/). Then we start at the beginning of the word again, this time blending all three sounds (/măp/). If there were more sounds in the word, as in split, we’d start at the beginning of the word for each successive addition:

/sp/

/spl/

/splĭ/

/splĭt/

Cumulative blending provides the extra support, or “scaffolding,” that beginning readers need. When you feel your student is ready, he can try blending all three letters without this additional step, but don’t try to withdraw the support too soon. These steps and the support they provide help memory issues immensely.

Try this Blending Procedure

Blending Procedures - download a free guide

You follow a similar procedure to sound out multisyllabic words with cumulative blending.

Our free Blending Procedure PDF has complete step-by-step instructions for both one-syllable and multisyllabic words.

Download a Free Blending Lesson

Teaching blending - download a sample lesson

Would you like to see how we teach blending in the All About Reading program? Download this sample lesson!

This is the first lesson in AAR Level 1. The blending activities start on page 4 of the PDF.

The All About Reading program walks you through blending and all the skills your student needs to become a strong reader. The program is multisensory, motivating, and complete. And if you ever need a helping hand, we’re here for you.

All About Reading Product Line

What’s your take on teaching kids to sound out words? Have anything else to share? Let me know in the comments below!

___________________________________
1 University of Royal Holloway London. (2017, April 20). Phonics works: Sounding out words is best way to teach reading, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 1, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170420094107.htm

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Kandi Spencer

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We would love to try this program.

Louise

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We love this program.

Alisha Munson

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I wish I had known where to find this info when my older children needed it. I will use these steps with the the younger one!

Samantha

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This works great!

Karen Gray

says:

Thanks! This is very helpful as we journey towards literacy.

Kim

says:

My 9 year old dyslexic son, is still sounding out a lot of words this way and then can’t remember the story he is reading. We have used A AT level one. He gets upset because 3rd grade is when I discovered your program and started st level 1 so he thinks it’s first grade. We struggle so much with reading.

Robin E.

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Kim,
I’m sorry to hear your son is struggling. However, please let him know that the levels don’t correlate to specific grades, because the order of the words in AAR is not “grade-level” order. As an example, here is a very simple online assessment. A child completing AAR 1 would be able to read most of the words on the 1st grade list, about half of the 2nd grade list, and a third of the words on the 3rd and 4th grade lists. All About Reading groups words in a logical manner based on similar rules or patterns regardless of their supposed grade level, which allows students to progress quickly and confidently.

All About Reading level 4 is not 4th grade. At the end of Level 4, students have the phonics and word attack skills necessary to sound out high school level words, though they may not know the meaning of all higher level words. Word attack skills include things like dividing words into syllables, making analogies to other words, sounding out the word with the accent on different word parts, recognizing affixes, etc…

Anna

says:

Looks awesome! I’ll be checking it out for sure!

Misty

says:

Thank you for this information. I have been tutoring an eight year old who is struggling to blend letters together. By the time we got to adding the third letter, everything was forgotten.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Misty,
I hope this method helps your student have success with sounding words out. However, if your student continues to have trouble, let us know. We may be able to help.

Jessica S

says:

I am so glad to have found this post. I was wondering how your curriculum approached reading, and this explanation of sounding out words and blending sounds together was very helpful. Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jessica,
I’m glad you found this helpful. Another key component to our approach is teaching phonograms and building fluency. You also might find our samples of All About Reading helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions.

Nicole R

says:

I think blending is one of the hardest things to learn.

Janali

says:

Hoping to begin the journey of using this curriculum with our children.

Saph

says:

My youngest is doing real well with reading. Can’t wait to get her started on AAR, since we’re just about finished with hooked on phonics 1st grade level. Had it from my previous child but will need to get the 2nd grade level and will be gettig AAR.

This is the biggest problem we have right now. My 6yo has been stalled on AAR level 1 lesson 4 for weeks because she just can’t remember the words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tara,
Try the steps outlined in this blog post. However, if your 6-year-old continues to struggle with blending, please contact us for further help. We are here to help you help your child succeed with reading.

We have been doing these steps already. She is slowly getting it, mastering one or two new words every few days, but it is so slow.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tara,
By mastering, do you mean being able to read the word on sight without sounding it out or do you mean being able to sound it without trouble?

We do not expect students to be able to read all the words fluently, without sounding them out, before moving on. Reaching the goal of fluent reading will be a gradual process over many lessons. Students may need to read a word thirty times before they can read it fluently without having to sound it out. Here’s an article on How to Develop Reading Fluency that you might find helpful. You will want to keep word cards in daily review until she can read them easily, without needing to sound them out, but you can move on. If the word card stack starts to get think, just rotate through the cards for 2 to 3 minutes each day and then proceed.

If you mean it is taking her a few days to be able to sound out one or two new words without a struggle, then we would love to discuss this with you further. We can continue to speak here, if you prefer, but it may be easier to discuss this by email at support@allaboutlearningpress.com, or by phone at 715-477-1976.

Tara Ziegmont

says:

I sent an email. She is memorizing the words, yes. She is not ever sounding them out.

Tami

says:

This is one of the biggest problems I have with my beginning readers. It is essential to be able to do for them to continue past the first lesson in AAR1. I wish the pre-reading program had more lessons on this to help them out, or a program between the Pre and Level 1. Looking forward to trying out these resources to see if it is what we’ve needed!

Robin E.

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Tami,
Thank you for taking the time to explain this to us. I will be passing this along for consideration.

Krystal Gordon

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I’ve never used this before but it sounds awesome!!

Lori

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Love the great articles and free resources! We already have AAS 1 and 2; would love to win level 3!

Lisa Waldron

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This curriculum has helped my kids tremendously! Thank you!

Tara Bailey

says:

interesting

Sara

says:

Great explanation of how to teach kids how to sound out words. Thanks!

Sarah

says:

Great resource!

Martha Sides

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This sounds like just the help that I need!

Tiffany

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This will be good to try with my youngest.

Bridget

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Excited to try this!!

Hailey

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Really excited to try out aas this upcoming school year with my kids. We have struggled with spelling curriculums for years! Hoping this is exactly what we need.

Crystal

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I have high hopes that AAS will be a game changer for my 9yo son. He read fairly well but his spelling is atrocious!

Devvy

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We’re starting our second year with All About Spelling & All About Reading. We love it! Thank you!

Valerie

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I am starting All About Spelling with my children this year! I hoping they will learn to be proficient spellers.

Stephanie Dunn

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This blog is very helpful to me as I’m just starting off our homeschooling journey this year. Thank you!

Robin E.

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Welcome to homeschooling, Stephanie. Let us know if you have questions.

April

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Great tips – so helpful! We just love All About Reading and All About Spelling!

Jill

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Great tips! Thank you!

Maria

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Thank you for the information and free downloads.

Shannon

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Thank you for reminding me of all the parts that go into being able to spell and building a strong speller. I appreciate your regular posts and tips!! As I homeschool, it is easy to get a narrow focus but information like this is helpful in broadening my vision and how I teach. Thank you so much for all you do!!

Robin E.

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Shannon,
You are welcome! We are very happy to know that our blog articles are helpful and encouraging to you.

Ann

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Thank you AAR and AAS for all the skills we need to become strong readers!! Homeschool Mom of 3 ages 7, 8 and 9.

Theresa

says:

I enjoyed the cartoon and explanation about sounding out words and then saying the wrong word. Our kids have all done that and I didn’t know why (since they said the correct letter sounds). Your explanation makes a lot of sense and I will look out for that now with my beginning readers.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Theresa,
All of my kids did that sort of “mmmm-aaaa-pppp, pan!” thing. It is frustrating, but with some help it is thankfully a short-lived problem.

Jennifer

says:

These are very helpful tips. Thank you! I can’t wait to try them with my students.

Anna

says:

I love both the reading and spelling programs.

Katy Linsky

says:

AAR is definitely at the top of my list to use with my first homeschooled!

Kathy Brennan

says:

We love this program and use the sounding out method regularly as we learn longer words.

Courtney

says:

I’m excited for my daughter (currently working through AAR2) to start AAS1!

Valerie Hughes

says:

Just starting to check out this curriculum.

Courtney

says:

The activities help keep my 5yo interested in sounding out words, even on days when she’s reluctant to participate.

Megan

says:

When I was teaching my son to read I would occasionally have to break up a lesson into 2 days so he wouldn’t get overwhelmed.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Megan,
Most children need two to three days per lesson in All About Reading, especially if they have had no prior reading experience. We recommend spending just 20 minutes a day on reading, picking up the next day wherever you left off. Needing two days per lesson is a great pace!

Lisa

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My daughter has started to love blending since we played “Ziggy Teaches School”!

Robin E.

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Lisa,
Ziggy is such a great teacher! :D

Christina Conte

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So helpful! Thanks for sharing

Christina Conte

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So helpful!

Nicole

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Nice reading checklist!

Jennifer

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Looking at Level 1

Faye Yarbrough

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I am really interested in and have heard a lot of good things about AAS and AAR, Would love to win the contest to be able to try the program with my 3 grandbabies that I am raising on my disability social security and homeschooling. One is 7 and dyslexic and learning to read, slowly. One is autistic, 13 and the other is 9, with both 13 and 9 year old going into 4th grade. I thank you for the chance to win

Carrie

says:

Great program! Hoping to win level 4 in your giveaway!

Whitney

says:

Love this!

Jody R.

says:

Great post! I’m so glad I’m able to homeschool and reach my children to sound words out. My nieces have been taught primarily to do sight words and there is such a big difference in their reading and comprehension

Rachael

says:

So fantastic!

Nancy

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Love these posts thank you for always giving me new ways to look at an issue.

Lindsey G

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I really want to try this with my youngest son. He is Autistic and really struggles to read and spell.

Robin E.

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Lindsey,
You may find our article on Teaching Reading and Spelling to Autistic Children helpful.

Esther Stoltzfus

says:

I’ve never used AAS but it looks good

Debbie

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I’m planning on starting Level 1 this Summer!

Amy

says:

This program is so amazing!

We love the AAS program! We’ve using it on our third of six kids now!

Renee' Horvath

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I love you program! I recommend it to everyone especially if their kid is struggling. I am in need of AAS level 7.

Robin E.

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Wow, you are near the end of All About Spelling, Renee’. Have you seen our article on What Happens After AAS?

Laken H

says:

This is a really good tip. Thanks!

Laurie Vogel

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My favorite resource is the flip books!

Sarah

says:

Great post. I should share it with my friends.

Sarah

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This would be really helpful for some one who has not used your program. It explains it very well.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Sarah. Being helpful is what we aim for!

Rebecca

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Thanks for the refresher and and free downloads! We’re going to be starting level 2 reading and level 1 spelling pretty soon!

tami sparks

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All about spelling is such an amazing program! I love using it!

Sarah

says:

Thanks! Love All About Spelling!!

Christina

says:

We love using the colored round plastic pieces in AAS to practice segmenting skills, my youngest is working on this now.

Chantel

says:

Love this method

Deb

says:

Awesome program! Wish I’d learned about it when more if my children were young.

Shell

says:

I love the ideas here! It follows with the things I have seen that work in my experience.

Nicole rauch

says:

My kids and I love these products l!

Wendy M

says:

Heard this was an awesome spelling program and I think I may have inherited parts of level 1. Would love to learn how to use this program!

Michelle Larriba

says:

I believe this is the single most important tool in teaching my daughter to read! She is able to sound out almost any word!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
This is wonderful! I’m so glad to hear this method has worked so well for your daughter.

Stephanie

says:

We love all About Reading no and spelling my dyslexic son is finally starting to read and enjoy it. I wish we had found this program sooner

Tegan

says:

Looking forward to trying these tips with my daughters.

K. Brannan

says:

Such brilliant method, thank you for the tips :) All of the all about publications look amazing! We are hoping to start with All about spelling level 1 soon xx

Kathy

says:

My son really has flourished with this method of sounding it out! Thanks for writing such good curriculum!

Elizabeth

says:

Great tips. There’s so much we take for granted until we start teaching someone else how to read. Thank you!

Mary blacklock

says:

Love this, needed the reinforcement and the extras to download

Christel

says:

Love the stuff to download to help out. Thanks!

Sarah W

says:

I was intimidated to teach my daughter to read but using your curriculum taught me so many tips like this one and she got it in no time!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
This is great! We’re so happy to hear that All About Reading helped you make learning to read straight forward for your daughter.

Kathy

says:

So true. I stop and sound out words with my son and the kids I work with at school while we read together. My son knows his sounds but still having a hard time sounding out words.

Anam

says:

Loved All About Reading level 1. Kids especially loved the books that came whit this program!

Audrey

says:

We have used all about reading level 1 and it was a success. So we will for sure use level 2. My daughter has dyslexia and severe learning disabilities and this program really helps. We would love to try the all about spelling.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Audrey,
Thank you for letting us know that All About Reading has been successful for your daughter.

Britney

says:

Very helpful information!

Kristy

says:

Good tips! I’m excited to start using aar.

Kristy

says:

Great info! I’m excited to start using aar.

Jessica

says:

We had such success with AAR1 and AAS1 that we are sure to keep using it. I recommend it to all my homeschooling friends.

Melissa

says:

Such a wonderful program!

Christina

says:

Good to know!

Karen

says:

I hadn’t thought of cumulative blending before. We start over when he can’t get it, but we still try all three sounds at once. I’m eager to test this to see if it will help.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Karen,
Let us know how it goes!

Jessica

says:

Your explanation of what is going on with a child while they are first reading is so thorough. We forget how hard reading really is after we have been reading for so long.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jessica,
What you are describing is called “The Curse of Knowledge“, when you know something so well that you no longer think of the individual steps anymore and it becomes difficult to teach. The Curse of Knowledge is one of the reasons that All About Reading and All About Spelling are so effective. Our programs break everything down into its small steps for you.

Kenda Wathen

says:

This is one things I think has made spelling a challenge for my older ones.

Emily Urban

says:

Love this program! Would like to win next level for my daughter!

Kelly

says:

Thank you so very much for all of your help and resources. I can always count on all about learning to help my student do their very best at reading and spelling.

Beth

says:

I just did this with my son last year. He totally got it! I love All About Reading and am excited to start All About Spelling with him this year!

Laura

says:

I’m so excited about this

Crystal Alexander

says:

Thanks! So helpful!

Carmen Erickson

says:

The procedure for blending that All About Reading teaches has really helped my daughter!!

Sarah Ter Maat

says:

I love all your blog posts and helpful hints!

Lauren

says:

This method has worked so well for my 5 year old daughter. I love AAR’s approach and she loves doing your program.

Angie

says:

I wish I would have used this for my daughter but I have two more to teach to read so it will be very useful for them!

Karen

says:

This method works! My son’s reading proficiency has increased dramatically. Thanks AAR!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Karen,
Thank you for letting us know that your son’s reading has improved!

Diane

says:

I started using AAR towards the end of last school year. We are continuing with it through the summer because I have seen such huge improvements in my girls reading and don’t want to see the “summer slide”.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Diane,
You may find our blog post, How to Beat the Summer Slide, helpful. It has lots of ideas on how to have fun as you keep reading and spelling skills strong.

Laura E

says:

I love that I am teaching my kids to sound out words instead of just “reading” sight words. I am so grateful I found AAR and AAS for my four children.

Kellye

says:

Love this!

Jennifer Elizabeth Hartnagle

says:

I love the scaffolding that this system employs. It solves so many reading mishaps from my first go round!

This approach really has been phenomenal for my girl… together with letter sounds learned from a different curriculum.

Sally villarreal

says:

This program has me intrigued!

Stacy

says:

It’s nice to find programs to help parents teach their kids. Keep up the great work! :)

Mary Lauritzen

says:

So thankful for the way you have figured all this out for us! Makes teaching our kids a lot easier!

Kristin Windmann

says:

Thank you so much for this! I actually just sent a link to this to my sister, who is working with a student struggling to blend. I have another friend who might find it helpful, and I’ll be sending it her way, as well.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kristin,
How thoughtful of you to think of your sister and friend! Some children struggle with blending because their phonological awareness skills are weak. Phonological awareness is the ability to identify and manipulate sounds in language. Your sister and friend might find this page helpful for building these skills, How to Develop Phonological Awareness.

Melanie Williams

says:

Thanks for this reminder! I have a 5 yo who is eager to sound out words, but has a hard time blending the sounds. I am going to start slow with AAR 1. My older two did not start as young, so we’ll see how it goes!

Laura Wright

says:

My 5 year old struggles greatly with blending and reverts to guessing every time. I’ve wondered about only trying to blend two sounds at once (ie /ma/ or /sa/ etc but never making it to the full word) just so there is less for her brain to hold. Any thoughts on this technique?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Laura,
You could try working on just blending two sounds together for a while and see if your child can have success with that.

How does your child do with phonological awareness skills? How well can she rhyme? If you asked her to tell you the first or last sound of a word, could she do it? For example, if you orally asked her to tell you the first sound of the word fan, could she tell you /f/? Not the word built with tiles or written, just spoken. There is a correlation between a student’s phonological awareness skills and their ability to blend sounds into words. Our Pre-reading level works on these skills, and it may be beneficial for your student to do that level even if she already knows all the letter names and sound. If she struggles with the phonological awareness portion of the All About Reading 1 Placement Test, then she would benefit from the Pre-reading level.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Laura,
You could try working on just blending two sounds together for a while and see if your child can have success with that.

How does your child do with phonological awareness skills? How well can she rhyme? If you asked her to tell you the first or last sound of a word, could she do it? For example, if you orally asked her to tell you the first sound of the word fan, could she tell you /f/? Not the word built with tiles or written, just spoken. There is a correlation between a student’s phonological awareness skills and their ability to blend sounds into words. Our Pre-reading level works on these skills, and it may be beneficial for your student to do that level even if she already knows all the letter names and sound. If she struggles with the phonological awareness portion of the All About Reading 1 Placement Test, then she would benefit from the Pre-reading level.

Carrie

says:

When I was teaching my oldest two to read, we had a little trouble of the sort described in the cartoon. I would have them sound out the word again, then I would repeat what they sounded out so they could focus on the sound. It didn’t take long before they could listen to themselves.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Carrie,
Repeating the sound that the student has sounded out is a great scaffolding technique, helping the student to get to the point when he can do it all himself. Thank you for sharing this.

Kristina R.

says:

This program is what broke down the barrier for my son and reading! We are both so grateful!

Margaret Goss

says:

Thanks! Both programs have been wonderful!

Erica Bancroft

says:

Teaching your child to read can be simple and rewarding! This tutorial is so very helpful in demistifying the ‘how-to’ by breaking it down into some simple first steps. Once a child has be introduced to the sounds the letters of the alphabet make, just take it one baby step at a time! Be patient with your child… & with yourself! You can do this!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for being so encouraging, Erica!

Shonda

says:

I think I need to slow down with my daughter. She completed the Pre-reading curriculum. She knows all her letters and sounds and we are halfway through level 1 with AAR, but she still is struggling with blending which makes reading so slow (and painful for me). I am going to relax with her a bit more, but try some of these techniques. She does not enjoy reading at all right now and that is not my intention.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Shonda,
Your plan to slow down is a good one. She needs to find blending comfortable and not a struggle at all before moving further into All About Reading 1. It may be helpful to go back to the beginning of AAR 1, both as a review and to build up her skills in this area. You want her to be proficient at blending before moving beyond the first few lessons.

Please let us know if you have further questions or concerns. We would love to help you help her succeed with blending.

Julie K.

says:

I appreciate AAS and what your program has done for my son!

Amy

says:

Love this!

Brenda

says:

I’m glad to see that I actually am doing something right!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Oh, I’m sure you are doing many things right, Brenda! However, I am glad to know this particular blog post was encouraging to you in this way.

Victoria R.

says:

I have found that tapping out the sounds on my arm is really useful when I teach blending.

Diana

says:

Being able to blend words is so important

Rebekah H.

says:

I used this procedure with my oldest son and it worked great. It did take lots of practice before he could do it on his own all the time. I also didn’t have him read with anyone other than me until he was confident in blending.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great points, Rebekah! Blending is a difficult skill for some children to master and it can take lots of reviewing and help until they get it.

Kim

says:

Can’t wait to start this program!

Anna

says:

This helped both my boys so much!

Elaine Swartz

says:

Thank you. This is the way I was taught. I have no problem reading etc. I a now gping to work with my grand daughter. Thank you SL much. God bless

Sara

says:

My son and I were just working on this with AAR Level 1 Lesson 1 today. We worked through it just like this. Although he seemed to understand, I think we’re going to have to repeat the lesson a couple more times before moving onto Lesson 2. Thanks for providing such a fabulous resource to help parents teach their kids to read!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sara,
Spending two or three days per lesson is very common for students. While some children can master the material in a lesson in one day, most need time. This blog post, Reading: How Much Time Should I Spend?, has more information about this.

Sarah

says:

Thank you so much. Mr 5 has been having so much difficulty with sounding out, nobody has ever explained it like you did. We won’t be getting so frustrated now.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
I’m happy to hear this will be helpful to you and your son! If he continues to have problems with sounding words out, however, please let us know. We have many helps and tips up our sleeves!

Tracie

says:

Looking forward to trying this with my son.

Rebecca

says:

Great info!

tara

says:

Great advice

Dawn

says:

Thank-you for the great descriptions. The cumulative blending Explanation makes sense and really explained a lot to me; something I’ll have to try. I would love to win a free set to get started.Thanks!

Laura France

says:

This is excellent information!

Fam

says:

If A child is learning English for the first time what will be the programs that i can use first?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Fam,
Our programs assume the child already understands and speaks English well enough to be able to follow simple directions and be understood by his teacher, in English. Once a student can speak and understand English that well, we recommend beginning with our Pre-reading level, even if the student is older. It has a focus on learning to listen to and manipulate the sounds of English, and that can help new English learners be ready for reading.

For learning to understand and speak English, the best method is to immerse the child in an English environment. A caring adult should bring the child along side them as they go about their day and talking about what they are doing, seeing, thinking, hearing. Read picture books. Work together. Do crafts Name objects. Have fun. Older children typically learn English in much the same way babies and toddlers do, but they do need to be surrounded with the language for a good portion of each day for the best progress in acquiring it.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have further questions.

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