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Anno’s Journey – A Wordless Picture Book

Anno's Journey - A Wordless Picture Book Review from All About Reading

Anno’s Journey has a story to tell, but the true treasure of this book is in the beauty of Mitsumasa Anno’s Hans Christian Anderson medal-winning illustrations.

The story follows Anno as he rides through the streets and countryside of Northern Europe. But rather than merely recounting Anno’s story, this wordless picture book instead tells the stories of each hamlet, farmyard, circus, and town square that Anno visits in visually rich, and often surprising detail.

Anno’s Journey readers will soon find themselves expecting…and searching for…the unexpected. A single journey through this book simply won’t be enough as you’ll want to spend time picking through the details of every scene with a fine-tooth comb.

A Look at Anno’s Journey

Reading Wordless Picture Books with your Children -- An All About Reading Series (Illustration from Anno's Journey)

As you read, be on the lookout for characters from fairy tales and classic literature, for glimpses of famous artwork, for the “old” juxtaposed with the “new,” and for things that simply don’t seem to belong. If you look hard, you might even find a couple of Sesame Street characters!

Young children will enjoy looking at this book for all its outstanding visual appeal, but older children who will be especially entertained by searching the pages of Anno’s Journey for its unexpected treasures.

Reading Wordless Picture Books with your Children -- An All About Reading Series (Illustration from Anno's Journey)

Please come back, leave a comment, and share the unexpected things you find on your journey through Anno’s Journey.

Tips for Reading This Book with Your Preschooler:

  • See if your preschooler can find Anno and his horse in every scene.
  • Ask your preschooler to describe the things that people are doing on various pages.
  • Ask your preschooler to look for the unexpected: references to historical events and figures, characters from literature, and even some pop culture figures.

Other Books By Mitsumasa Anno:

  • Anno’s Aesop
  • Anno’s Counting Book
  • Topsy Turvies: Pictures to Stretch the Imagination
  • Topsy Turvies: More Pictures to Stretch the Imagination
  • Anno’s U.S.A.
  • Anno’s Britain
  • The King’s Flower
  • Anno’s Counting House

Love this wordless picture book? Learn more about reading Wordless Picture Books with your children and view more of my favorites!

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Leave a Comment

Kara S.

says:

This one is still my favorite Anno book. It’s as much a book for studying art as it is about studying history in general, or just enjoying for its whimsicality. I don’t recall when I first began “reading” it, or whether my parents “read” it to me first, before I took the task over, but I read it even nowadays–it’s found on MY shelves as often as my children’s shelves. (My mother remembers me growing quite irate at one corner-page scene of the little man sneaking up a ladder to look over the fence of a lady’s yard while she’s bathing!)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kara,
Thank you for sharing how this endearing book became a part of you! It says a lot about a book for it to have such a lasting impact.

qbenk

says:

i’m badly want to know, did Anno’s Journey can say the one of wimmelbild/wimmelbooks genre?

Kendra Ahlborn

says:

While Anno’s Journey doesn’t have fold-out pages, it’s very much a Wimmelbilderbuch! It has those hidden mysteries you have to lovingly tease out as you get absorbed in the pages, and the illustrations are puzzling and animated in the best possible way! If you’re a Wimmelbilderbuch lover, you’re going to fall head over heels in love with this book. Consider yourself forewarned. :)

qbenk

says:

yes, definitely i will love it. have ordering it and can’t wait the book to come. did blog all about learning press (dot) com have some article that explaining about wimmelbilderbuch? maybe references about wordless books that similar with wimmelbooks? by the way thank you so much for replying me! :)

Kendra Ahlborn

says:

You’re so welcome! We currently don’t have any blog posts about wimmelbilderbuch books. Sorry to have to tell you that. However, if you read this book and love it to smithereens, you’ll probably also like, “You Can’t Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum.” Here’s a link that gives details on the book: http://gatheringbooks.org/2011/04/14/balloon-and-metropolitanmuseumny/

Feel free to take a look at it and see if it’s your cup of tea! Once again, it doesn’t have the fold out pages, but there’s a wealth of allusions to art and culture that are just lovely. It’s a joy to read!

rmetheny

says:

This looks like something that would work for my daughter with Down syndrome. I will be trying this out.

Kendra

says:

Would you mind mentioning how “Journey” went over with your daughter? I’d love to know.

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