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30+ Important Things That Tests Can’t Measure

Pencil laying on standardized test

There are many things that standardized tests can’t measure.

Tests can’t predict who will “succeed” in life, regardless of your definition of success. Tests can’t tell a child how or even what he needs to improve. Tests penalize our most creative thinkers. And our world needs all the creative problem solvers it can get.

So when I get an email or phone call from a parent whose child has scored poorly on a standardized test, my immediate hope is that the child hasn’t taken the test scores to heart.

That’s because I’ve seen what can happen when a child takes a test score too seriously. The shoulders that slouch in defeat. The voice that shakes with embarrassment. The sad eyes that let you know your child feels he’s let you down.

Ugh. It makes me want to stomp my foot and tell the child, “It just doesn’t matter. You are NOT your test score!

Share One of These Posters with Your Child

Help your child recognize the importance of the virtues that tests can’t measure. These colorful and inspirational posters are a visual reminder to emphasize character traits like creativity, generosity, and honesty. All four posters contain the same information, so just choose the design that you like the best and click to download.

Poster of things tests can’t measure - black with flowers
Poster of things tests can’t measure - black with colored penciles
Poster of things tests can’t measure - white with flowers
Poster of things tests can’t measure - white with colored pencils

(Quick note: the posters are PDFs that will print out at 8.5″ x 11″. The poster with the white background will use the least amount of ink.)

After downloading the posters, please share this post with as many people as you can! This is an important topic that extends far beyond reading and spelling.

Things Tests Can’t Measure

There are many (very important!) things that tests just can’t accurately measure. For example:

  • A test can’t measure the compassion that shines in the eyes of a child caring for a chick that has fallen from its nest.
  • A test can’t measure the generosity shown by a boy who gives his birthday money to the homeless man on the corner.
  • A test can’t measure the creativity that has been poured into every priceless piece of artwork that hangs on the refrigerator.
  • A test can’t measure the joy a little girl feels while slow dancing on her daddy’s feet in the living room after dinner.
  • A test can’t measure the determination it takes for a child with dyslexia to complete just one reading assignment.
  • A test can’t measure the love that is wrapped up in the warmth of a child’s embrace.

Children everywhere deserve to know this: YOU ARE NOT YOUR TEST SCORE.
You are so much more.


More Things Tests Can’t Measure (As Shared By Our Readers):

More from our readers:

  • Tests can’t measure imagination. (Ashley P.)
  • Tests can’t measure how amazing our kids are! (Heather)
  • Tests can’t reflect the delight of listening to a child read and act out a story with great expression and delight (Thanks, All About Reading!) (Pam C.)
  • Tests can’t easily measure a child’s logic skills. (Learner)
  • Tests can’t measure the gifts possessed by these young people, but especially their hearts. (Stacey)
  • Tests can’t measure if a child will be a good citizen, a good husband or wife, or a good parent. (Susanna Y.)
  • Tests can’t measure how much our children are loved and wanted. (Susanna Y.)
  • Tests can’t measure success because learning is a journey in life…practice always makes progress! (Susanna Y.)
  • Tests can’t measure faith, trust, hope, reliability, or depth of character. (Laura)
  • Tests can’t measure friendship. (Sara)
  • Tests can’t measure self-worth. (Sarah)
  • Tests can’t measure what a child really knows. (Janet)
  • Tests can’t measure curiosity or determination. (Maceo and Mama Pat)
  • Tests can’t measure daily progress. (Sue)
  • Tests can’t measure effort. (Alison S.)
  • Tests can’t measure a child’s potential. (Diana)
  • Tests can’t measure resiliency. (Lori C.)
  • Tests can’t measure diligence and determination. (Wendy T.)

Is your child still feeling discouraged about a test score? Surround her with encouraging words!

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Leave a Comment

Nema

says:

I love the list of all these things tests cant measure.

Barbara

says:

Tests can’t measure awesomeness.

John Webb

says:

If only this could be related to the education leaders, parents, and ultimately the kids here in China! So much emphasis and self worth is put on testing and scores.

I have seen so many lives disrupted because of the erroneous claims of standardized test and those who administer them. They did not come down from the mountain on stone tablets, and we need to remember that!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Dr. Guyer, for this reminder. I love how you put it too!

Malynda Warren

says:

This was one of the many reasons we took our daughter out of public school. She was doing get, even had great test scores, but she felt stupid because she wasn’t like her friends.

Alma

says:

You can test everything, this writing was just nonsense. You can make fogscreen for lousy pupils, but it ain´´t gone change the faith. good ones always go high in life.

Jo

says:

I am printing this out in A3 size to put in my classroom. I have a class full of anxious children and we have just been told we have yet another standardised test to give them 3 times a year. I feel like I am no longer a facilitator of learning but just teach children how to take tests. I have a passion for teaching and love to see children shine, but all these tests are killing their spirit!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Jo,
We’ve had people tell us they were able to send this file to a printing store and get this printed in poster size for under $10.

Thank you for your passion, and for being the kind of supportive teacher you obviously are!

Sheila

says:

The posters are all wonderful reminders of things that we hope all of our children will possess. Our children need to be reminded that test scores so not define them as a person and should not limit their desire to try hard in all areas of their life.
That being said, standardized test are a measure of a child’s knowledge of a particular subject. I know some children get nervous and may not do as well. Some do have true learning disabilities that prevent them from doing the test in a timely manner. Most school districts make provisions, because it’s the law, to make provisions for these students who have a real need.
I know many parents of homeschool children who complain about standardized testing. It’s the only time that their children are tested and measured against other children their age. They complain that it’s not fair and their children aren’t good test takers or they have a learning problem. Unfortunately, sometimes this carries over into the attitude of their children. As adults, they don’t understand why they don’t perform as well as their peers or they settle for mediocrity. Our society is full of mediocre people. They want to only do what they want to do, they don’t want to put forth any extra effort in areas where they are weaker than their peers. They complain because someone gets a head of them, even though his person has worked harder and put forth more effort.
We must teach our children that being a good person and having great qualities make us who we are, not a test. But we can’t let them settle for average because something is too hard. It’s like participation trophies…..those who just participate shouldn’t be rewarded just because they made an “effort ” like those who truly achieve. Effort is a good thing, but life is so much more than just making an effort!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sheila,
Thank your for your input, but labeling yourself (or your child) as a poor test taker isn’t settling for mediocrity. SAT scores, for example, are a poor indicator of how well a student will do in college.

Sheila

says:

If your child is a poor test taker, college is going to be a difficult time for them. College is about tests, papers, projects. It’s life. High school is the training ground for college. If they can’t cut the test in high school, chances are college is going to be very difficult as well. That being said, if something is hard for my child, I get them the help they need to success. My child graduated with a 3.80 GPA and a 32 on her ACT test. She was not a good student in math. She never liked it and it never came easy for her. Because of that, we always Had tutors and extra help for her. It can be done if parents want to put forth the effort and if they teach their kids that succeeding isn’t always fun or easy. If it was, everyone would succeed. Effort is necessary, but effort doesn’t always help you come out on top.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sheila,
You are equating being a poor test taker with also doing poorly on papers and projects. The one does not necessarily lead to the other two. Also, the skills needed to do well on standardized tests do not always (or even usually) match up with the skills needed to do well on a test written by a professor. My oldest child struggled with the SAT because he would overthink and over reason the questions. Despite this, in college he has done well (current gpa is 3.75 in a small, private engineering school) because he gets to know the professors and is better able to understand what they mean in their test questions. He has always done outstanding work on papers and projects, and is continuing to do so.

My son’s experiences are not unique. Many students do well to very well in high school and college, but do mediocre (at best) on standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT. They truly are a poor indicator of academic success. (And it’s not just me or All About Learning Press saying that; there has been research studies done on the subject. Here is the link to one.)

Tests can’t measure effort, distractions, readiness to learn, misinterpretations of the question, cultural bias, outside factors apart affecting one’s ability to learn or concentrate (sleepiness, boredom, illness, fear, worry/anxiety, anger, hunger, depression, restlessness, self-worth, teaching style or unaccommodated disability, language barrier, etc.)

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

This is a great add-on and reminder for us, Alison. Thank you for sharing.

Leanne

says:

I am thinking of a young girl, who is failing in the school system, whose family is struggling financially, and who looks around her and thinks everyone is better. Perhaps these words can help her find in herself her worth. Because I am involved with her in a non-school setting, I was surprised to hear from her mother her struggles, it is not the girl I see. I am going to glue it to a cover of a composition book, so she can put in it pictures or words to remind her of her unique worth. Thank you.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Leanne,
Your sharing this girl’s struggles with her own worth moved me. It is a small thing that you are planning to do for her, but I think it will be a powerful small thing.

Jana

says:

Thank you so much for saying this!! My DD is only 7 but I am very leary of formal testing for exactly the reasons you stated. No number from a test will determine my daughter’s future!

Diana Barber

says:

Tests can’t measure potential!

Lucy Lou

says:

Found your website browsing for material to teach my granddaughter how to read and write she is dyslexic ( 8 1/2 ) we are presently homeschooling because in Arizona she doesn’t get assistance. So all she does is fall behind and get more depressed.
Maybe there will come a day where we will not be measured in A and B ‘s but our worth as a whole and the contribution each of us makes to society regardless of a High school diploma.
Thanks so much.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Lucy,
Let us know if we can help your help your granddaughter in any way. I, too, live in Arizona and have dyslexic children, so I understand.

Denise

says:

thank you. these things can’t be emphasized enough. I appreciate hearing the same wisdom from folks I trust.

Kim

says:

My son is struggling in one particular area and I put this in his folder to remind him what really matters in life he has 110%!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kim,
That was a great idea to place the printable somewhere personal to your son. Thanks for sharing it.

Lori Constable

says:

Tests can’t measure resiliency.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Exactly! Thank you for sharing, Lori.

Lori Constable

says:

Tests can measure resiliency.

Tracy

says:

Wow! Wise words that ring so true. I feel that public schools put so much imfesis on testing instead of learning the things kids really need in life. I love home schooling. I can let my creative child be himself and this poster is so perfect. It’s a reminder of who he is and how important it is to be true to yourself.

Rachel Creamer

says:

Tests cannot measure a child’s potential for doing the Lord’s work… And being able to complete it :)

Merry at AALP

says: Customer Service

Amen!

Juliet Thomas-Arthurton

says:

Hi;
Will you be creating tee shirts of these wonderful poster. I feel it will be great to bring about awareness to our communities and the world around us.

Thanks for allowing me to speak my mind.
Juliet Thomas-Arthurton
Mom of two dyslexic children and also dyslexic myself.

Merry at AALP

says: Customer Service

Hi Juliet,

That’s a clever thought! I don’t know that we’ve considered this, but I’ll pass your suggestion on to Marie.

Merry at AALP

says: Customer Service

We won’t be at this time, but here’s an idea for you: print the poster onto transfer paper (flip the design first) and iron it onto a t-shirt. If you try it, we’d love to see a picture!

Juliet Thomas-Arthurton

says:

Test cannot measure the way my son plays the keyboard with joyous smiles and the grand feeling that I can do sometime that no on but can teach me. Cannot read the notes because he is severally dyslexic and still visually impaired. The look on peoples first of amazement when their thought that he was dumb, stupid and knows nothing.
Test cannot measure when my son sings causes his teacher to bring tears of joy to her eyes after she has called him lazy, and accuses him of not wanting to learn.
Test cannot measure nurses thought we would not make it at birth and shows up 11 years later and say thank you for taking care of me and fill there hearts with joy by playing the keyboard he was inspired to play by the Holy Spirit. Thank you for allowing to post my painful but still joyous heart concerning my dyslexic son Joshua.

Merry at AALP

says: Customer Service

Beautiful, Juliet, thanks for sharing about your son!

Ellen

says:

Oh! I love these! I’m printing the blue one and hanging in by the kids’ computers as soon as our printer is working again. Thank you!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Ellen!

Wendy Tuttle

says:

Tests can’t measure diligence. All of my children are homeschooled, but they had to take a standardized test when we had them enrolled in a public “homeschool/distance learning” program that my husband wanted to put them in a few years ago. Two of my 7 children are dyslexic and the oldest one of those two just happened to be in third grade that year, which is the first year that has to take the tests. She had just learned to read two months before the test (maybe at a 1st-early 2nd grade level) so it was pretty slow going. My daughter stayed in that room for hours for all three days of testing while she read each and every question, hours after all the other children had left. The proctors would tell her she didn’t have to finish and could go home like a few other children had done but she wouldn’t quit. She finished every last problem. When the scores came back, she didn’t pass Math or Writing….but she DID pass the Reading test and she’s just gotten better and better since then. Now she loves to read, can spell very well, and although there are still problem areas that she’s working on, she now tests advanced in reading and passes the Math and Writing with quite high scores too. The diligence she showed might have been annoying for the test proctors, but it was inspirational to our family.

Wendy,
This is an amazing example of what tests can’t measure! What a remarkable character your daughter has! Thank you so much for sharing this with us.

I hope you all are having an amazing summer.

Sue

says:

Standardized tests can’t measure daily progress — they just aren’t designed to be sensitive to growth.

MamaPat

says:

Tests can’t measure curiosity nor determination. Children are naturally curious about their world, even your world. They are determined to get what they are curious about. If you don’t believe it, just try to keep something from them. Children have a natural tenacity for learning. We have to get out of the way so they CAN learn. What we need to learn is how to ask them questions, like we want to learn from them. I think we call it put the shoe on the other foot. MamaPat, a retired gifted teacher of smarty pants gifted teenagers. I have 4 little curious grands.

Merry at AALP

says:

Great post! I agree–learning to ask good questions is one of my most important jobs as a teacher. And I love playing up to their curiosity. Reading aloud and stopping at a cliff-hanger…and you know you have them hooked because they can’t wait to find out what happens!

Danielle Stubbs

says:

These standardized tests drive me nuts! I have, however, been preparing my daughter emotionally since we will have to take them in our state. I just encourage her to try her best. I’m pretty confident in her reading skills thought thanks to AAR! It’s been amazing to witness how far she’s come in the scope of a school year. I love being able to see the difference first hand too. All our hard work is paying off!

Merry at AALP

says:

I’m glad you’ve seen good progress with AAR! Congratulations to both of you! I hope the testing goes well and doesn’t prove to be upsetting. I too encouraged my kids to do their best, and some special treats on test days helped too.

Margaret

says:

Love this poster. It came out the day before we started our standardized testing… I sent copies to all the moms in our co-op. What an encouragement! Thank you!

Julie T

says:

I love the poster. The characteristics listed on the poster are ones that I am hoping to instill in my daughters through homeschooling. Thank you for all the helpful and encouraging articles on this website.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You are so welcome, Julie. This poster was a joy to put together because we believe so strongly in these values. :)

Melanie

says:

You all are great! I wish I had seen this as a child who had test anxiety all the way through college. I shared this with my homeschool group to encourage others to visit your blog that is so encouraging. Thank you so much. We love your curriculum. Blessings

Melanie,
I think it’s great that you shared this with your entire homeschool group! We would love for every family with children to be encouraged in this way!

I hope you have a great weekend.

Maceo

says:

Tests can’t measure curiosity.

Sarah

says:

I LOVE this post. Sometimes it is easy as a homeschooler to compare my kids in one way or another. This is a good reminder to stop that! I also love the posters. Thank you for making those available to us!

Sarah,
You are welcome. Aren’t the posters great? We have some lovely talented people at All About Learning Press.

Have a great week.

haiyen thi nguyen

says:

i like this post

Jen

says:

Love it. Thanks for sharing!

melinda Weddle

says:

This is one of the reasons we homeschool. Thankfully, I live in a state where state testing is not mandatory for homeschoolers. My 8 year old son was already stressed (as were his teachers) about the high stakes reading test. They spent all year pushing him through on his reading and taking him out of class that he completely missed math! These tests are disrupting our children’s learning processes. My daughter has dyslexia and that part almost brought a tear to my eyes. Thank God we found this program and it is working so well for her.

Melinda,
When I hear these stories of the pressure being put on primary aged children… It makes me both sad and angry. Learning to read is hard enough without having to add to it. And then to actually cause the situation where the child will later be behind in math. Sigh.

Thank you for sharing. And keep up the great work with your kids. Let us know if there is any way we can help you.

Peggy

says:

Love this post.

Amber

says:

Such a true and inspiring post. Just one of our reasons for homeschooling.

Amber,
Thank you for your comment. If you do instagram, you may want to check out our account. We are doing a month of what tests can’t measure. https://instagram.com/allaboutlearning/

Have a great week!

Kimiko

says:

I love this :) It’s so encouraging, reassuring, and true. It helps me to be in the right frame of mind with my child and my journey of homeschooling.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I’m happy to hear that this was encouraging to you, Kimiko. I hope your homeschool journey ends up being the adventure of a lifetime. Stay the course! :)

Christine

says:

It is encouraging to see a blog post about this subject. I truly believe that tests nowadays aren’t measuring what they should.

Tara

says:

LOVED this post! We are using an online school right now and it’s just test after test after test. My kids are so stressed out. We are NOT doing that again next year!

Tara H

says:

Thanks for sharing all of these! It is an encouragement to me each time I see a “tests can’t measure” post on Instagram or elsewhere.

Lori Shaffer

says:

Loved these! Thanks so much!

Sonja Z

says:

Love this! What a great reminder to not teach to the tests.

susan

says:

I really enjoyed reading this post. So much pressure is put on kids during this time of testing. They should know that they are more than their score.

Diana M

says:

Thank you for this! This has always been my belief but has been hard to articulate to the In-Laws. I have printed a poster and have it hanging in our homeschool library.

Diana,
Time is the best “proof” for nay-sayers. Time and again I’ve seen it happen, both personally and with many other families.

I hope the poster serves as inspiration for everyone, and that you have a lovely week. Thank you for sharing.

veena

says:

Very true. I teach my students – TRY, PROBLEM, I DONOT KNOW are banned words.
I give training academics and in personality devolopment also hence they will become good citizens to the nation.

Kelly Levesque

says:

This is so true. Reminds of the meme of the different animals.

Rebecca Smith

says:

I’ve seen the other side of the coin where the parent thinks the child should be able to get into a great school because his standardized test scores are really high but his actual classroom performance is almost nothing. No participation, and no homework turned in. Very frustrating for all as well.

Christina

says:

This comes at a much needed time as we are struggling here with some test taking

Tyra

says:

I love the poster! Very encouraging!

Tirzah

says:

Awesome poster. I have used this same philosophy for years. It is nice to see it in a poster so I can hang it up. Thank you. :)

Maryandra

says:

In this age of public school testing all the time…these points would make great reminders or encouragement for teachers as well. I’m sure many of them feel they are loosing their love for teaching CHILDREN and their love for sharing their knowledge as they are weighed down by forms and scores.

Charis

says:

So great for my daughter who is so hard on herself if she misses any questions on a test!

Merry at AALP

says:

Some kids are so hard on themselves!

These are great! Thanks for making them and sharing!

Shakeeta W

says:

Love this post! Tests can’t measure the capacity of a child’s love.

Vanessa

says:

Wisdom is the ability to put knowledge into work/ action and that tests cannot measure.

Tina

says:

Tests can’t measure how proud they are when a concept “clicks.”

Krista

says:

One of the main reasons we homeschool is to develop those things you mentioned that are not testable. Love this.

Linda

says:

Tests can’t measure the willingness a child has to serve others.

Kristi Ryder

says:

Test can’t measure the heart! ♥️

Stephenie McBride

says:

Being there in the moment will tell you so much more about what your child knows than any test can.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Very true, Stephenie! Thanks for that reminder!

Amy P

says:

Love the ideas and poster. thank you for reminding us all the there is so much more to measuring our children’s success than testing.

Nicola

says:

Love the poster that we chose! Thank :D

Jen

says:

I love this post and appreciate it! Our kids need this information and even more, I think kids who go to public school need to hear these thing. Thanks!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Jen!

melissa

says:

this has come right at a time when I have been struggling with wondering if I should have my daughter tested by the schools just because she’s not learning at the same rate as her siblings….but the test isn’t always the answer! thank you for this reminder!

Robyn McLeod

says:

This post reminds me of Sarah Mackenzie’s “Teaching From Rest”. In there somewhere I remember realizing that the point is to teach the child – not the curriculum. Do you want her to check off all the boxes, or understand the concept? It’s so easy to get wrapped up in numbers -how many pages, how many questions, how many chapters to cover in how many weeks. But the beauty of homeschooling (and it’s brought to my attention in this post) is that we don’t have to measure our children against every one else who happens to be born in the same year. There’s so much more to consider!

Merry at AALP

says:

Yes! I came across that concept (we teach children, not curriculum) sometime early on in my homeschooling, and that thought has often helped me retain the right focus when something would be challenging for my kids.

Nicole

says:

This is such a wonderful article! It helps to put the focus back on the fact that we are nurturing a soul in our teaching, not just getting through a curriculum. Thank you!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Nicole! :)

Rachel B

says:

Nice posters :)

Emily

says:

If I had been defined by my high school test scores, I would have never gotten a job, and probably never been allowed to homeschool. I was a terrible test taker in HS. I knew all the info, but would freeze when it came to taking the test. Probably why I was so determined to homeschool our kids, and why I give them some leniency when it comes to tests. Because I don’t want them to feel defined by their test scores, and yes, they are so much more than a score. Thanks for the great article!

Merry at AALP

says:

Thanks for sharing your experience, Emily. I’m sure your kids are blessed by your encouragement and care for them!

Angela O

says:

Testing can’t measure his love for nature.

Kalah Roges

says:

Test can’t measure the true understanding of a topic held by a student .

Terri Baehr

says:

I have never grasped the whole reason for the state testing, it simply stressed the kids out and then does not even give a good look into the whole picture of where they are. I love this post, it is exactly how I feel.

Rachel

says:

I love these reasons! I was just talking to my kids about this yesterday. All their friends at church were rejoicing that their state standardized tests were over. It was nice to know mine didn’t have to participate to prove what I already knew they knew and we didn’t have to teach for that test all year.

Gena Mayo

says:

I really love these posters!

Bryanna

says:

I love this post. I have issues with the standardized test, and this hit right on one of my main reasons. Thank you for sharing!

Jennifer Autrey

says:

Love this! What a child has learned can not be measured in one test.

Jenny

says:

Great article! One of the reasons we decided to start homeschooling! All this standardized testing was stressing my son out and he started falling behind.

Christine Ridderikhoff

says:

Testing can’t measure love of learning or curiousity.

Misty

says:

Great article! We need to remember what standards we are trying to get our children to measure up to.

Anne

says:

Testing is one of the bigger reasons why we chose to homeschool.

Julie

says:

Love this. It’s so true. That’s why I dislike standardized testing.

Lydia

says:

I hope to win the giveaway.

HELLOEVERY1

says:

These words are so true! Thanks for sharing.

Judith Martinez

says:

I love these! Every classroom should have one hung up.

Rebecca

says:

Really enjoyed this article and the posters – thank you so much!!

Shannon Harvey

says:

LOVE this article!!! Thanks for such great wisdom & encouragement for our kids!

JEnnie Greco

says:

I agree with you completely. thank you for this post.

Leanne

says:

YES!!!!! So important to remember – thanks for the posters!

Mary V

says:

I am experiencing my first “testing” as a homeschool parent. Very interesting to consider what they do and don’t measure. Thanks for sharing.

Sarah

says:

One of the many reasons I am homeschooling is to bring joy and a true love of learning to my children. No test prep can do that :-)

Jennifer M

says:

Tests can’t measure my daughter’s potential on a day she may have the focus, the necessary hours of sleep for that focus, the perfect breakfast, just the right encouragement…and they can’t measure her potential on a day when she’s had none of the above. Only she can continue finding her potential!

katy

says:

Love This!

Gita Suchland

says:

Thank you so much! So true.

Melissa Gibbons

says:

Thank you.

Amanda Moore

says:

Thank you for this. Really, thank you, thank you, thank you! <3

ELIZABETH Parker

says:

Love this!!!

Christee

says:

im a new, first-time homeschool mom to two little boys. Can’t wait to get started!

Erica

says:

These are really lovely, but they are not working for me… :(

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Erica,

I’m sorry for the frustration.

First, make sure that you have downloaded the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader: https://get.adobe.com/reader/

When you click the picture that you want, it should automatically download to your computer. Then make sure you are using Adobe Reader to open the file.

If you have a slower internet connection and it doesn’t seem to be downloading, let me know which one you are interested in and I can try emailing it as an attachment. Email me at support@allaboutlearningpress.com. Hopefully we can get it working for you!

Gina

says:

I love this! Thank you for the wisdom and tools to encourage children to be the best they can be while remaining confident in themselves!

Les Johnson

says:

I SO agree with this. This is the first year I homeschooled my daughter and she just took a standardized test to see her progress. My husband is more anxious about this because he wants her to do much better than she did while in school outside of the home. The fact is, I can see how many things she has learned this year that will not show up on a standardized test. I have reminded my husband that no matter what, she has grown and learned a lot this year, no matter what the test shows.

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Les,

Good for you! Testing can be such an emotional time, but there is so much more to life and to a child’s development and well-being than what tests can show. I hope you’ve had a wonderful year with your daughter and that you’ll enjoy many more fruitful years of homeschooling!

Marcy

says:

Tests can’t show our children’s gifts.

Jackie Rosolowski

says:

Tests can’t measure a child’s curiosity and the knowledge they have on the things in this world that interest them.

Becky

says:

Thank you for putting this together! I am putting this in our encouragement corner. :)

What a nice idea, to have an encouragement corner!

Shelley flannery

says:

I love this! My child knows so much more then what a test will show.

I just printed one of these out for test week next week! These are the perfect reminder that for us it is just a requirement for homeschooling and we know the true value of the child!

I’m thankful that this poster can serve as a friendly reminder to you and your child, Lindsay! Hope all goes well during test week.

Amy Johnson

says:

Tests can’t measure that will that is constantly turning as ideas are being made and created I n that beautiful creative head of hers.

Meredith

says:

Love these! So true. =)

Leni T.

says:

These are some beautiful posters that summarize what little things we take for granted but do need to teach.

Erin R

says:

After years of struggling in PS with reading and spelling and tests that didn’t show true struggles or potential we are looking forward to truly learning how to do both at home!

Vicki A Sosa

says:

Would love to share with all my children. Thank you

Jessica DuBose

says:

Love All About Reading! We started with the Pre-reading volume and my son is now half way finished with level 1.

Emily

says:

Love this! Printed one off for our school room!

Heidi G.

says:

I can’t wait to share with my child. Thank you.

Michelle Autry

says:

Great post! Thank you.

Kim D

says:

Yes. There are so many things that are more important that tests, grades, job titles, etc. We have a saying in our house, “It’s more important to be kind than to be right” that we’ll say when the need to be right causes arguing to get out of hand.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

What a wonderful saying, Kim! Thanks for sharing!

Christopher Lim

says:

Test can’t measure a character of a person.
Test can’t measure the attitude of a person.
Test can’t measure the joy of being in a loving family that accepts the child as they are.
Test can’t measure the nurturing spirit of a child who would look after God’s creation.
Test can’t measure the righteous spirit of a person.
Test can’t measure the intimate relationship one has with their spouse, child, siblings and God.
Test can’t measure the spiritual maturity on has with God.
Test can’t measure the acceptance of others as they are.
Test can’t measure the ability to relate to people who are different.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so right, Christopher! Tests are certainly limited in what they can “measure”. There are so many good qualities of character and kindness and everything else good that can never be qualified by taking a test.

Christopher Lim

says:

One last important point.
Test can’t measure success in life.

Jennifer

says:

Tests can’t measure a child’s God-given talents and purpose.

Great article!

sarah

says:

Test can’t measure commitment to learning

Debbie

says:

Thank you – such good reminders about testing and how eternal character and cannot be measured by human means.

Jennifer

says:

Tests can’t measure your value to God.

Laura Norris

says:

I agree with this so much. My child struggles with tests, but at least he doesn’t get upset over them. I wish the schools didn’t put so much emphasis on these things! Thanks for reminding us of all the other wonderful qualities of our kids!

Lexi

says:

Tests can’t measure the joy my kids have in learning and the joy I have in watching them succeed and overcome challenges.

I do test my children some years but they never see the results. I keep them for me in case there are areas we need to improve. But otherwise I don’t find them to be overly helpful. I don’t want to discourage my kids.

Karen

says:

Thank you for this encouraging post! I look forward to sharing it with my children!!

tammy music

says:

amen one of the reasons we pulled our kids from PS

Jessica

says:

Beautiful posters!

Ambre Sautter

says:

Thanks for sharing! I know a lot of local kids stressed by the test culture. I’ll be sharing this with their families!

Connie

says:

I always appreciate the information provided and freebies. All About Spelling is very easy to teach and use.

Chris

says:

Thanks for these pretty posters! What a great reminder for my kids … and me!

Patty

says:

My son has been learning so much with your program. Thank you!

Jacque Hughes

says:

Thanks so much for this post! My daughter is working her way through AARL1 and having a ball! I love that she is able to work her way through the program at her own pace. Thanks for all you guys do!

Amber

says:

Tests don’t measure a child’s ability to apply knowledge to real life situations.

Irene O.

says:

Thanks for the reminder! We love all your products. My little ones have learned so much with you programs in an easy/casual way.

Amanda L

says:

Tests can’t measure creative thought

Stacy

says:

This is exactly what I tell my children about these tests I know how perform without a silly test telling me I know my kids well enough

kigazuki

says:

Tests don’t measure the fun you have learning

Michelle Freeland

says:

Thank you so much for this.

Lisa Coomer Queen

says:

It can’t measure how stressed and upset your child becomes just at the thought of testing. Thanks for a great post!

Angi

says:

We are about 1/4 of the way through AAR1 and our daughter is just loving it. The added “fun” of the activity book pages/cut-outs really make phonics drill fun. She also loves it when I lay out the green word cards on the floor in a path and she collects them as she reads each one. I like the pick-up-and-go manual, making my time commitment minimal yet effective.

Tara

says:

I am new to homeschooling and I love the information on your site.

Tests can’t measure a love of learning, and how that will develop into a passion for lifelong learning, I would argue, possibly the most important of all educational outcomes in today’s fast-changing world.

If anything, all of this testing and test prep is helping to kill off a love of learning, in the same way Ted Robinson argued that schools are killing creativity in that famous TED talk 8-9 years ago.

Donna Mauney

says:

Tests cannot measure how much effort a child has put into a task based on their ability.

Janys Carney

says:

This is a beautiful poster. I am ordering one for my granddaughter’s teacher. I have been to her IEP and I am not impressed with her teacher. My granddaughter is learning enabled and this teacher thinks it is more important for her to finish her work than to go out for recess. She works with her on her arithmetic during both recesses. Told it had to stop and it did for awhile, but now I understand she is doing it again.

Dawn

says:

I’m researching curricula to use for my daughter and this looks wonderful so far! I’m looking forward to seeing her love of reading come shining through!

Shane

says:

Great advice! My wife is looking forward to using this program…looks awesome

Alta

says:

I love this! Not only do I have elementary age children, one of whom struggles with learning issues, but I also teach college students and just gave them a test that they were nervous about. I try to be very fair, but also tell them “points are like Confederate dollars – only useful in certain circumstances.”
As I raise my children, I often ponder what “success” means, and what it means for them, with their unique packages of strengths, weaknesses, passions and gifts for the world.
Thanks for reminding us of real priorities, especially during this busy, stressful, test-filled season!

Merry at AALP

says:

What a great comparison–“points are like Confederate dollars!” I love it!

Debra H.

says:

I loved this! Thank you so much for addressing this important concept for both parents and students. I’m sharing with my homeschool group and printing off a poster for our home.

Nancy Heilman

says:

Tests can’t measure invisible but powerful things, like how desperately we all want to succeed in life & to be good at something. That’s how God created us to be.

Tara Peschel

says:

Tests can’t measure the anointing God gives to a child….out of the mouths of Babes….

Pam kosinski

says:

Thanks for sharing these passed them on to a public school special ed. teacher who is in the middle of testing this week.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for passing along the posters, Pam!

Lori

says:

This post touched my heart & got me a little, no, a LOT, misty-eyed. As a child I suffered a serious head injury & struggled in school from then on. Tests were especially difficult since I could no longer memorize. Fast forward many years to my grandson we are raising. He is dyslexic and struggles with writing and spelling. Your curriculum has been such a blessing and he is doing so well. He would not have made progress in a public school with all the tests they give. I am so glad he hasn’t had to suffer through that. Thank you for your wonderful program and encouragement ♥

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Oh, Lori, you are so welcome. Thank you for letting me know how much this post touched you. I’m sorry to hear of your head injury and subsequent struggles as a child, but I’m thankful to hear that you’re enjoying our curriculum with your grandson. We wish you all the best and all the encouragement we have to offer! If you ever have any questions or have a problem with one lesson or concept in particular, please don’t hesitate to get into touch with us. You can call us at 715-477-1976 or you can email us at support@allaboutlearningpress.com. Please stay in touch, especially if you need anything!

Martina

says:

Tests can’t measure perseverance

Martina

says:

Tests can’t measure kindness

Kelly

says:

Thank you for the printable! This is so encouraging for our little ones than can become so discouraged this time of year :)

EB

says:

I’m glad I’m not the only one who believes this. Tests can cause such anxiety for my youngest and we have to reassure him he is more than that test.

Erica

says:

I am a mom of three busy boys …my oldest is ready to read and I can’t wait to start with this program!! I really hope I win!! :)

Mary B

says:

I am so glad to live in a state that doesn’t require standardized testing for homeschool students. We love your reading program. My kids are in Level 4.

DailyWoman (Lacey)

says:

I would love to try this program out with my son. It sounds like it would work well.

Nathasha

says:

I love your program and cant wait to get started with child number 3!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I’m glad you enjoy it, Nathasha! :)

Renita Sue Loyd

says:

Thanks for everything, every time. Its the little things that mean so much to many of us, the big things are just bonuses.

Heather

says:

Thank you so much for the reminder of the things that tests can’t measure. Not only does it give our children more confidence to see and hear those things, but it also gives me confidence as a homeschool mom. No matter what my children score on their end of year test, God has a plan for them. They are who they are!

Catherine Tronrud

says:

I am gathering ideas for helping my struggling 3rd grader. I would like to have a more structured, yet fun approach than my hodge-pudge of flash cards and workbooks. AAS and AAR may be my answer. What I do know is that you have a very practical and inspiring website!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for your kind words, Catherine! :)

Nikki

says:

This is the first year I have zero tests for all my kiddos. They are loving that the “pressure” is off! Now they are free to love learning, the way it should be!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Yay for the love of learning! Thanks for sharing, Nikki!

Jennifer Crowe

says:

I love these posters so much. Thanks for sharing!

Julie Rankin

says:

You are so right!

Cristiane

says:

Tests can’t measure a child’s musicality, and musical improvisational skills!

Candace Berryhill

says:

I believe standerized tests can put too much pressure on kids.

heather

says:

Here! Here! And thank you for the timely reminder :)

Sara Sharer

says:

There is no test for friendship, excelling at relationships, helping others.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

These are good additions to the list, Sara! Thanks!

Heather Krupa

says:

This is so true! Love the posters. All about reading level 1 is just what my daughter has needed. She loves the readers. Looking forward to continuing the levels.

Kathy

says:

Have used All about Reading levels 1 & 2 & All about spelling level 1. We love them!!!!

Roxanne

says:

I love this article and the posters. I printed off one for each child’s bedroom and another for the hall. This is really good. I have a daughter who is smart, on the honor roll but doesn’t always test well and it stresses her out. Her thick hair has thinned during her high school years even. Her twin brother knows a lot more than the test show often show however; on certain subjects he likes such as History he aces the test but doesn’t do class work. Our youngest boy does well in school and is very creative but struggles with the self control at times. We will use your poster as motivation. Thanks again.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I hope this blog post helps your kids, Roxanne…your daughter in particular. I’m sorry to hear that she gets so stressed out about her test scores! So, yes. Please do hang up this poster in your kids’ bedrooms and your hallway. Kids can’t be measured by their test scores, and this poster will hopefully serve as a friendly-reminder of that in your house.

Sarah

says:

TRUTH!! Self-worth, and even understanding of subject, cannot be determined by a test score.

Janet

says:

Test can’t measure what a child really knows but just had an off moment during a test!

Regina

says:

This is soooooo accurate! There are life skills that just cannot be learned from a book or tested. That being said, I wish All About Spelling had been available for my 24 year old. She is a terrible speller. However her inability to spell did not stop her from attaining her dream job, she is a crypto-linguist in the USAF and does great with her job and training. I am using AAS with my 7 year old and will be using it with my 4 year old next year. I love how the program introduces new concepts and goes back to review past concepts in one step. What great building blocks for reading and writing.

Jill

says:

About testing, I would like to share with you all what my college graduate son, “Director of Civil Engineering” at the firm where he works, told me (sorry, I’m a mom, I brag). Several years ago I was stressed over one of my children’s inability to spell and he said, “Mom, I have graduated college and can’t spell, but I have spell check on my computer. Truly, you will find something that helps and even if you don’t…theirs aways spel chek” (spelled incorrectly on purpose) ~ha! This helped me, but what helped more was the email I received about “All About Spelling.” I had never heard of it. How providential was that? It helped tremendously…not perfectly, but I saw an incredible improvement.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Jill! I love “coincidences” like that! Thanks for sharing your story and your older son’s advice.

Jill

says:

Please do not stress over the testing process because your children will tune in to this causing them unnecessary worry. I speak from experience. One of my children could not seem to get it…I mean any of “it.” I thought I was failing her because she couldn’t recall much of what we had just studied the previous day. I didn’t concern myself too much in the beginning because, hey, it was 1st grade after all, but then it was 2nd & 3rd and before I knew it we were in high school. Panic! Now what? For one thing I knew that doing well in math or whatever had nothing to do with her going to heaven…ah, relief. And then I realized she had picked up much more than I gave her credit for. We focused on what she was good at and enjoyed rather than what the world deemed essential. She had always had a way with children so in 11th grade she decided to take Childhood Development Associate night classes (CDA) at our community college. You ask how she got in. Prayer, lots of prayer. She studied like crazy and after taking the Compass Test the maximum amount of times, she (barely) passed.
She has graduated and will be promoted to Nursery School teacher this summer at the Nursery school where she works, Lord willing. So please know that God will provide a way when you do your best and put Him where He belongs…first.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Congratulations to your daughter, Jill! What a great accomplishment, and an inspiring story!

Jessica Conkey

says:

I love these posters! It’s so true that tests are only PART of what we know … they may test our academic level/skills, but they don’t test other, sometimes more important, qualities in a person.

Adrianne Telleria

says:

They cant measure creativity or imagination

nicole

says:

A wonderful reminder that testing cannot discover the depths of an individual’s love or creativity!

Cassandra

says:

What wonderful printouts! Fortunately, we do not need to do much testing at this level but these are great reminders of how to be beautiful person!

Trisha

says:

I based so much of my self-worth on my school performance. I’m so thankful that I have the opportunity to homeschool my kids. I hope that I can help them find their self-worth in Christ and not through their performance.

Trisha,
I, too, am so thankful for homeschooling and the opportunity it provides to have a different focus. Thank you for your comment.

Sue

says:

I needed to read the testing comments today of all days. My child is testing this week and not showing how smart he really is. He does the work every week great, but a test throws him out of whack and into melt down. Thanks for reminding me what tests don’t show.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I’m glad this was helpful to you during testing week, Sue!

Laura

says:

I was never good at taking test. I remember how I used to panic and just stare at the test while others around me were already completed. I wish someone had encouraged me then. So thankful for AAL!

Laura,
Thinking of students experiencing what you described makes me sad. I wish we could encourage every one of them!

Thank you for commenting.

Rebecca

says:

It is so easy to slip into the worldly mindset of measuring our abilities through tests. I remember how disappointing it was for me to take the ACT test for college, since I am terrible with timed tests and the pressure of doing really well to be able to get scholarships and help for college. What is more important, though, money and recognition and empty praise from others, or humility and Joy and appreciation and grateful ness for what we have and where we are academically? We are so incredibly blessed to have the opportunity to be educated and to teach our children! I want to have the eternal mindset of Joy and hope and grateful ness…and I want to teach that to my children. Thanks for the encouragement!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thank *you* for your encouragement, too, Rebecca! And thanks for pointing out how blessed we are to have the opportunity to be educated and teach our children.

Bethany Bechtold

says:

Some children are just not good test takers – I am one of them. I had a very good GPA but did not do great on my SATs. I wish I had one of your posters back then. Thanks for sharing.

Bethany,
I had to learn to understand how a person could be a good student but a poor test taker. My senior in high school was exactly that. Thankfully, it seems colleges are looking at much more than simply test scores now-a-days. I just hope that this spreads to areas beyond college admissions as well.

Thank you for your comment. I hope you have a lovely week.

Robin Martin

says:

Sometimes kids miss the forest for the trees on standardized tests, but that ability to narrowly focus and stick with an area of interest over time is a gift. Most of our scientific discoveries have been made by people like that. If your child is like that, celebrate his gift.

Suzanne

says:

Thank you for posting these Marie! I have twins, a son and daughter who just turned 12. My daughter is an amazing artist and animal lover and sees the world in such detail and colors. She loves your spelling program, and even asks for it each day! She has severe test anxiety, but has to take the state tests, as we are with a public charter school. I’m printing out this poster for her to bring with her next week. I want her to remember how much she is loved for all her lovely qualities, and just for being herself. We all deserve to know we’re loved and lovable no matter what!!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

What a great idea–to send the poster along with your daughter when she takes the state tests next week! I hope it helps minimize her test anxiety, and that it helps her bounce back more quickly after the stressful week.

Britani

says:

If every kid is different and every child tests differently why do we use the same test to measure?

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Exactly!!! Thanks for your comment, Britani!

teresa

says:

Tests cannot measure how much love and sacrifice have gone into making you who you are.

holly

says:

Seeing what a child has learned can be done then by testing. My son does amazing with learning but when it comes to testing he panics. I don’t think any child should have that pressure but on them.

cynthia lilley

says:

Tests can’t measure knowledge,our Moses is dyslexic but his grasp of so many subjects is overwhelming,he reads way below his level and a test would NEVER measure how intelligent he is!

Laura

says:

A test is unable to measure where the child is at in their walk with God. It cannot measure faith, trust, hope, reliability, or depth of character. Nor does it measure maturity. Thank you for the reminder and the beautiful posters. One of my children is quite disheartened by math testing results. But this child has a way with animals that is amazing to watch! Plus a memory for dog (and horse) breeds that is incredible. I’ve had to remind her that the math results are not a reflection of her heart or her value.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for adding to the list of things that tests can’t measure, Laura! We’ve added them to the box at the end of the blog post. Your daughter sounds like a beautiful and sensitive soul. I hope that this reminder that she is not her test score is helpful to her.

Kayla

says:

Thank you for this. My son takes scores way too seriously.

Lori May

says:

Printing one poster now. For my 4th grade girl! Thank you!

Sarah Malone

says:

I wish I had read this blog when I was in highschool! So much pressure is placed on testing and it easy to forget how many things are so much more important!!

Sarah,
My oldest faced the stress of high school testing this last year, and thankfully I think that the importance of SAT and/or ACT test results is less today than it was when I was in high school. When I was a senior, colleges only wanted my scores and an essay. My son had to submit his scores, an essay, and then pages of details about his activities, his interests, his leadership experiences, and more. I find this to be an encouraging change in focus, and I hope that it flows into areas other than college admissions as well.

Thank you for your comment.

Karyn Panchot

says:

Love this email message! Working with special education students, these words of wisdom are even more important than you can imagine!

Karyn,
We’re glad we could be of encouragement. Thank you for your so very important work in special education.

Susanna Yip

says:

Yes, Marie.

I would love to keep you posted :)

Sue & my little Aidan

Kim

says:

Tests can’t measure a lot of things!

Amanda W.

says:

Right on! There is so much more to life than test scores and so many other virtues not to be ignored. We’ve been so blessed to be able to submit a portfolio evaluation for our yearly review. It is more like a yearbook and a celebration of what we’ve achieved that year and doesn’t carry the weight of anxiety that standardized testing does. I think I will have my child do the standardized test next year and perhaps every 3rd year after that, but it will not be submitted, only for my own reference to see what areas in which we may need more work.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Portfolios were a wonderful alternative to testing for my daughter, too! We did do some testing to give her practice in this area, but our emphasis was on creating a customized portfolio. Thanks for sharing your comments!

Andrea

says:

Thanks for the poster and the encouragement!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Andrea! :)

Sara Stout

says:

This curriculum looks very helpful and I look forward to checking it out this summer!

Abby

says:

Totally agree. My parents would never tell me my test scores as a child

Susanna Yip

says:

Good for them and for you as well, Abby. Glad your parents were so wise :-)

Susanna Yip

says:

Ooops….forgot this: Tests can never measure how they succeed because I believe it causes us (as parents) to compare the results with kids in the neighborhood/community — even in homeschooling. The anxiety is tremendously “crippling” for those with dyslexia and other LDs. In our family, tests are simply just guidelines. But most certainly an encouragement that we get to see a glimpse or a slice of what kind of learning IS going on in our kids.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You are very wise, Susanna! Thanks for sharing your thought process regarding testing in your household.

Susanna Yip

says:

Hi Marie,

Such a privilege to hear from you. Your program has given the love and liberty to learn to my younger son who would seize (epilepsy) each time he had reading or writing.

With your program, spelling tiles and phenomenal “hands on” approach, he started to spell independently within the first month we started the program. The Phonograms App is so useful and we refer to it daily. The Spelling and Reading programs are for anyone who wants to see the joy of learning in their children’s lives.

This program is well researched and heart driven by your passion to free the our kids from shackles of their doubt and fear. The first time hewrote a note to tell me he loves me was well worth it. Tears were coming down his 9 year old face and mine.

Need I say more?

A heartfelt gratitude from Vancouver, Canada.

:-)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

WOW, Susanna. The privilege is all mine. What an amazing story! I am humbled to have played a role in your son’s breakthrough, but it is truly a testament to your and your son’s hard work. If you get a chance, please keep me updated on his progress!

Susanna Yip

says:

Tests can never measure if they will be a good citizen, productive individual, a good husband or wife or good parents. Tests can never measure how valuable our children are as gifts and rewards. Tests can never measure how much they are loved and wanted. Tests can never measure success because learning is a journey in life so …practice always makes progress!!! Thank you, Marie :-)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for your contribution, Susanna! Tests definitely can’t measure those things! We’ll add them to the list at the end of the blog post to share with other readers. :)

Colleen Johnston

says:

thank you for posting this. home schooling is about more than just academics!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Very true, Colleen!

Hannahlei

says:

Thank you for this reminder at a critical time of year! I love AAS, and would love to try AAR with my 3 year old when she’s ready.

Kaile R

says:

These posters are wonderful!!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks Kaile! Glad you like them!

Angie Kelley

says:

Great reminders, Marie! Thank you so much for encouraging us in this very important truth!

Emily

says:

What a beautiful reminder to look at the whole child!

Tanja

says:

I needed this today!

Karen

says:

This is a good post for PARENTS. It’s hard not to use test results as a measure of how things are going. There is much more to life than tests.

Susanne

says:

Yes! Great reminders. Thank you.

Stacey

says:

Such truth! Tests cannot measure so many gifts possessed by these young people but especially their hearts.

Lauren

says:

This is a wonderful post. Yes, there is a place for testing :) But we are so much more than what a test says! I love this program, All About Reading and All About Spelling. It is so methodical and easy to understand, not to mention effective. Thank you!

Lauren,
Thank you! What a lovely comment. I’m happy you have found All About Reading and All About Spelling so helpful to you. You are welcome.

Deann

says:

These are great things to remember!

Julie

says:

Thank you for this encouragement. We have made huge progress in reading this year even though the test scores didn’t reflect it. Thank you for encouraging our schooling journey.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Julie! I’m so glad to hear about your child’s progress in reading this year!!! Wahoo!!!

Pam C

says:

Beautiful, Marie! In our family, we were talking the other day about things the standardized math test can’t detect – all the concepts of algebra and other things that our student is learning that can’t be tested with multiple choice addition and subtraction. And no computerized test could reflect the delight of listening to a child read and act out a story with great expression and delight (thanks, All About Reading!).

This is a great reminder, and those of us who are homeschooling and are required to take standardized tests need to remember that those tests only measure a narrow slice of what’s really going on in home education.

The poster is going up today!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for your contributions to the list of things that tests can’t measure, Pam! And you are so right–tests can only measure a narrow slice of education–well put.

Laura

says:

Thank you for sharing this! It is just what I needed after a hard day of testing! Our children are worth so much more than a test score!

Rachel

says:

Thank you so much for this! So many kids (and adults) need to understand this. Wonderful work!

Sydni Bamberg

says:

I am using level 3 of your spelling curriculum this year, and my daughter is making huge improvements! Thank you for this wonderful curricula!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Syndni! Congratulations to your daughter for making huge improvements in spelling!!! Good job, both of you!

Ola

says:

This is so timely! I need these reminders just as much as my kids! Thank you.

Learner

says:

we just started with AAR this winter/spring. I am SO thankful for the opportunity to use this curriculum. I have a son who has not caught on to reading quickly; it’s taken a lot of work. but AAR is giving him tools and skills to overcome his struggle. I am THANKFUL.
and incidentally, testing doesn’t always measure LOGIC skills. my son is a champ at chess and easily bests a variety of opponents.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Learner! Logic skills–what a great contribution to the list of important things that tests can’t measure! We added it to the box at the end of the blog post to share with our readers. Thanks!

Rebekah

says:

Thank you for this. These posters are awesome. I am going to print these out and hang them in each of my children’s rooms and then frame them for their school teachers. I have a son that HATES school, because of all the tests that happens, especially these stupid, idiotic state tests. I am ready to HOME SCHOOL all of my children, at least then I can control and teach them the important things in Life.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

What a great idea to share the posters with your children’s school teachers! I’m sorry to hear that your son hates school, though. :( My heart goes out to him. I hope he is encouraged when you share the message of this post with him. He is NOT his test score!

Melissa

says:

Thank you for such a wonderful reminder that tests do not define who we are! God does! I am so very thankful for your curriculum that has helped my son who struggles with dyslexia to learn to read and spell. He is still behind his age group, but I am so proud of his effort and determination. He has come so far and we both recognize his progress, even when the last standardized test didn’t. All About Reading & Spelling has put him on the path to true learning and success! Thank you so much!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for sharing your experience, Melissa! Great job supporting your son as he learns to work with his learning differences. It’s not easy, but you’re doing it! Let us know if you hit any stumbling blocks. We have lifetime support, and we’re here to help! (715-477-1976; support@allaboutlearningpress.com)

Jen

says:

Tests can’t measure the time you & your child have put into the subject together.

Kim

says:

Thank you so much for this excellent post. Of my four children, some excel academically and some struggle. I have to keep reminding them (and myself) that the Lord has created each of them for His good purposes. We are each unique creations, His workmanship. Thank you for the encouragement!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Yes! We must honor the uniqueness of each and every one of our children (and us!). Thanks for your comment, Kim!

Jennifer

says:

I agree. I was not a “good” test taker pretty much ever. I usually didn’t fail, but I never did as well as what I did on my regular work. When I was in grade school it was worse. We had something called MEAP testing, if you performed well, you got $500 grant for college. I panicked, misread, and got so distracted by the bubble sheets that my slightly OCD self wanted to make patterns out of! They thought I couldn’t read in 4rth grade because of it and put me, very briefly, in remedial classes. I was devastated, heart-broken, embarrassed. My friends weren’t my friends until I wasn’t in “that” class anymore. It not only made me feel bad about myself, but also for the kids in “that” class. What ambition would they have to try when the rest of the school kids were making fun of them. It’s terrible. It’s just so very frustrating that kids were taught in public school that if you can’t pass a test, you were dumb. At least that was the all around mentality in my school.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You may not have been a good test taker, but you are a wonderful communicator, Jennifer!!! You obviously had very painful experiences while growing up, in large part due to testing and not being properly evaluated, and that was horrible. Thanks for sharing your heartbreak, and for speaking up for kids in remedial classes and kids who don’t do well on tests.

Twila

says:

Tis post is so timely! Thank you so much!

Cindy

says:

I look forward to using this wonderful curriculum!

Angie

says:

Thank you for the reminder that test scores do NOT make the child! I wish society at large would get this through their heads. : ) I’m sure colleges miss out on exceptional students because they rely so heavily on standardized test for admission.

Jennifer Nelsen

says:

I love this! I would say character is my favorite on there! It’s sad that test scores are deemed more important than any of these… I always did well on those tests, and it never occurred to me that some people (my husband) didn’t even care or try to do well.

Jennifer,
I totally know what you mean! I always found it easy to do very well on tests. Yet the result was great grades, and a very lazy work ethic. Not exactly a character trait to be proud of! (I’ve gotten a bit better as I near 40 :D).

Thank you for commenting.

Melodie

says:

Tests are somewhat artificial. They do have a purpose but need to stay within that in order to be a helpful tool. Even though I believe learning is organic, I love curriculum like AAR & AAS-it’s an amazing tool. To say that a test score puts a label on you is a complete misuse. Tests are to help us, to diagnosis areas of weakness so we can be aware. It’s not a bad thing, it just needs to be used appropriately. :)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Well put, Melodie!

Kelly

says:

Thank you for the always-needed reminder!

Jenni Ramirez

says:

We love All About Reading and just started All About Spelling!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I hope you enjoy All About Spelling! :)

Heidi

says:

This post is excellent. Tests really can’t measure what our children know.

Eleni Kallaur

says:

Love All About Spelling. Can’t wait to try All About Reading!

I love this post. Perfect timing, as we just started character studies!

dmm

says:

So agree. We had meltdowns about this last week!

Angela

says:

This is so true, my middle child stresses when she misses a question on her math, let alone a standardized test! We spent days talking her through the fact that there will be questions on the test that she won’t know the answers to, and to just give it her best shot. I purposefully don’t show her the scores!

Catherine

says:

Beautiful! Thanks.

Natalia Catlett

says:

So true!! Testing seems to not be an effective way to check the “who” of our children. They truly are created in a unique way from the Lord and no standardized test measures in the way our Lord does.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

So true, Natalia! Thanks for commenting!

Angela

says:

Good points! Thanks for sharing.

Ari

says:

Tests can be viewed as good things, when the student is accurately prepared. If we can take time to prepare them, a test can feel more like a celebration of hard work than a measuring stick to predict a child’s future or potential. Its tragic how lots of standardized testing is far removed from those principles.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Very true, Ari!

Jennie

says:

I will remind my older tutoring student about these thoughts regarding testing. Very encouraging and thank you for sharing.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Jennie! Thanks for sharing with your tutoring students!!!

Faiza

says:

I really like the article and the posters because unfortunately without realizing it we put so much emphasis on these tests. Thank you for reminding me and all parents that there’s more to our children. This definitely is a topic worthy of more discussion.

Faiza,
Try not to feel too badly about emphasizing tests in the past. Our entire culture stresses standardized results far too much.

Tests can, and arguably should, have a place but there is much more to a person as well. We completely agree that this topic is worthy of more discussion. Thank you for your comments here.

Lisa

says:

Wonderful reminder this time of year!

Christina

says:

Pretty posters!

Jaclyn

says:

Love these, going to be printing one for our school room!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Yay! Thanks for letting me know! Glad you liked them!

Ginger

says:

This is so true and such a great reminder for this season!! Thank you!

Laura

says:

Great reminder.

Rebecca

says:

Our state doesn’t require testing for homeschoolers (IL) but you have to do a lot if you want to join the PS system! My youngers would do terribly – perfectionists, struggling readers, etc. But my 8th grader liked doing well on the standardised tests to go to PS highschool because she said she felt validated that it wasn’t just someone who loved her that thought she was ‘smart’. I like this poster TONS because it’s a good reminder that what’s ‘validated’ by these standardised tests is a small thing out of many important and valuable qualities. And that intrinsic worth has nothing to do with performance at all anyway.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

That’s great that your 8th grader likes taking standardized tests, and that she does well on them! I was always a good test-taker, too–it can be a fun and valuable skill for those who like it.

Mary

says:

Thank you for the wonderful reminder that many of the most important things in life are not measured by standardized tests! And thanks for providing such a well-planned, structured, FUN and supportive curriculum for struggling readers.

carrie

says:

I love this! Thank you so much. My favorite is that it cannot measure determination. That is so true and such a great characteristic for our children to have. The best test scores in the world without determination won’t matter at all!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Very true, Carrie! Thanks for commenting!

Naomi

says:

Such a great reminder not to get hung up on “academic achievement”!

Jodi

says:

We are loving AAR and AAS. I love this post about things that tests can’t measure. I am printing one of these out!!!

Brenda

says:

I really enjoyed your page.

Charisa

says:

i love this curriculum!! I use it for both my girls.

Sephra

says:

Great article! I completely agree.

Jenni Wilson

says:

I like when I heard someone say they don’t test because they already know exactly what their homeschooler knows and doesn’t – they are sitting right next to them. With that being said, I do believe there is some value in teaching kids how take tests, in case they enter the PS system, or even for down the road for tests they’ll have to take as an adult. I think it should be taught how to take a test, just like how to do a worksheet. It’s nothing they should have to fear.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Jenni! I agree–test-taking is a skill that can and should be taught. Thanks for sharing!

This is such a wonderful post ! Thank you!!! :D
and thank you for the Chance to Enter to win Curriculum level of “you” choice !

CHantelle

says:

This is such a great reminder – thank you!

Angela

says:

So true! What a great visual reminder!

Tracey

says:

Love this! My son is struggling with reading but excels at so many unmeasurable things!

Jarica

says:

Thanks for this post! What a great reminder!

Kadonna

says:

What a great reminder!

Ashley Pittman

says:

You could add imagination to this list. Unfortunately, for those who don’t test well, even the things that the tests are supposed to measure aren’t necessarily measured accurately.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for your comment, Ashley! We added “imagination” to the “More Tips from Our Readers” box!

Merry at AALP

says:

Oh, good one! Sadly, one test my daughter took had a question that I felt tested *against* imagination. It asked if we could call a table by another (made up) word, and the student was supposed to choose “if we all agree to call it that.” But the answer my 8 year-old chose was, “if the table told us to call it that.” The question showed up again the next year; I was sad when she got it “correct.”

silver

says:

We have to test because of state regulations. But I don’t tell my kids their results. I don’t want them to get defeated *or* puffed up. I tell them the results are for me to see how they’re doing and if there are any areas I need to help them with.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

That’s a good way to explain the test results to your children, silver! Thanks for sharing!

Dana Maya

says:

I have recently read a couple disturbing articles on testing in regards to reading comprehension and vocabulary. They are usually computer generated and are so focused on details that often the big picture is missed. Tests don’t measure how a child may internalize a story and relate it to their own life or how some may bear no relevance at all. Testing is huge reason why I homeschool. I was always good at tests, but my son is a much more creative thinker and sometimes chooses wrong answers on purpose just to be silly or see what happens.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You bring up a good point, Dana. When students know that they will be tested for reading comprehension (where minor details are emphasized over the big picture), they often read in a different way. In their effort to try to remember the details, the big picture is missed, as you point out.

Jaime B

says:

I think this is so fitting. I know the day will come when we will need to implement some testing, but fortunately we aren’t there yet! And as long as we homeschool, we will be able to place proper emphasis on these other means of “testing”. :)

Heather

says:

Tests can’t measure how amazing our kids are!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Heather, we added your comment to the “Reader’s Tips” box at the bottom of the blog post. Thanks!!!

Shannon

says:

The excessive levels of testing are one of the many many reasons we have chosen to homeschool! Our state is even considering adding 25 days to the elementary calendar to make up for the lost instructional time. Our kids, and teachers, are so much more than what a “standard” anything can show. Thanks for the reminder to focus on what makes us who we are and not what a series of numbers may or may not say.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for sharing this extra information about testing in your state. You are so right–our kids and teachers are so much more than the tests results!

Julie

says:

Thanks for speaking to my heart and reminding me that it’s not about what a test can show.

Kate

says:

I loved this post, and I so needed this reminder :). I have a struggling reader, and sometimes I worry about him or even feel frustrated. But he is one of the sweetest, most generous little boys…. And that’s so much more important! (By the way, we got out All About Reading kit in the mail today and jumped into Lesson 1! It was so nice to see him enjoying learning… And I enjoyed it, too!)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Kate! I’m happy to hear that your struggling reader enjoyed his first lesson in All About Reading! If you ever hit a roadblock with the lessons, please feel free to contact us at support@allaboutlearningpress.com or 715-477-1976. We’re here to help!

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