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How to Teach Prefixes

Are you looking for the best way to teach prefixes? This mini teaching guide shows you how! And don’t miss the free printable prefix list, along with activities that help your child master words with prefixes.

What Is a Prefix?

A prefix is a word part that is placed in front of a base word. Common prefixes include pre, bi, and anti. Take a look at the examples below.

table showing prefix examples

A prefix usually changes the meaning of the base word.

Think about the word happy. The prefix un placed in front of the word happy makes a new word with a new meaning: unhappy. The prefix un means not so it changes the meaning of the word happy to not happy.

un + happy = unhappy

The Two Most Common Prefixes

The most common prefixes are un and re. These two prefixes are the most useful for beginning spellers to learn because they appear frequently and their meanings are easy to understand and remember.

The prefix un-

Un means not (unhappy = not happy) or the reverse of, or opposite of (as in untie).

The prefix re-

Re means again (redo = do again) or back (as in repay).

If you’re interested in learning more about prefixes, download and print this list of 90 common prefixes.

click to download a list of 90 common prefixes

Tips for Adding Prefixes

Tip 1: The spelling of the base word never changes. Simply add the prefix to the beginning of the base word, as in the word tricycle.

tri + cycle = tricycle

Tip 2: Be aware that double letters can occur. If you add the prefix un to natural, both the prefix and the base word retain their original spelling. The result is unnatural.

un + natural = unnatural

Other examples where double letters occur include misspell, irregular, and unnoticeable.

Tip 3: Watch out for prefix look-alikes. Some words contain the same string of letters as a prefix, but upon closer examination you’ll find that they are not prefixes. The re in real is not a prefix.

re + al ≠ re

Other examples include uncle, pretty, and interest.

Tip 4: Sometimes a hyphen is needed. If you are working with an older student, it is handy to know the six rules for adding prefixes found in the next section.

6 Rules for Using Hyphens with Prefixes

A prefix is usually added directly to the base word, but there are several cases where a hyphen is needed.

Rule 1: Hyphenate the word when you add a prefix to a proper noun or a numeral.

hyphenated prefix examples

Rule 2: Hyphenate the word when you add the prefix ex meaning former.

ex + president = ex-president

(Do not use a hyphen if ex means out of or away from, as in expel.)


Rule 3: Hyphenate after the prefix self.

self + respect = self-respect

Rule 4: Hyphenate to separate two A’s, two I’s, or other letter combinations that might cause misreading or mispronunciation.

hyphenated prefix examples a's, o's, and i's

Rule 5: A hyphen may be used to separate two E’s or two O’s to improve readability or prevent mispronunciation.

hyphenated prefix examples - e's and o's

Note that many words with double E’s used to be hyphenated as a general rule, as in re-elect, re-establish, and pre-existing. However, current style manuals and dictionaries now tend toward “closing” the word except in cases where readability is affected. Both versions are currently accepted and listed in most dictionaries.

Rule 6: A hyphen is sometimes used after the prefix re to prevent misreading or confusion with another word.

hyphenated prefix examples - re-cover vs. recover

As in “Re-cover the boat when you recover from the flu.”

hyphenated prefix examples - re-lay vs. relay

As in “Please relay the message that they will re-lay the tiles.”

Printable Activities for Learning Prefixes

By now you’ve probably realized that we take prefixes very seriously here at All About Reading and All About Spelling! And though this guide to prefixes may seem like a lot of information, we don’t overload your child with all of this material at once. We teach just one small concept at a time, incrementally.

Here are a few prefix activities from All About Reading and All About Spelling.

download free prefix word flippers

Prefix Word Flippers

Practice reading words with prefixes with these Word Flippers. Download this activity from All About Reading Level 3.

download free word trees

Word Trees

Use Word Trees to explore prefixes in a novel way. Read more about using Word Trees in this this blog post, and download this activity from All About Spelling Level 7 to help your child practice building words with Word Trees.

download our blank prefix list

My List of Prefixes

Download our blank list and let your kids create their own list of prefixes. Start with a few examples and have them add to the list as they discover more words with prefixes. Discuss the meanings of the words on the list as they are added.

Was this post helpful to you? Be sure to check out our mini teaching guide on suffixes, too!

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Melanie

says:

About Spelling was my second choice, but it seemed to good to be true. Originally, I was going to use the Orton-Gillingham system, but its price was way out there and to use the system, you had to travel to attend their trainings. I found someone who was cheap by nature and had chosen All About Spelling for her son who she had removed from public school for they were treating her child with dyslexia like she was dumb. That’s all that I needed, and boy am I happy. My child uses both All About Spelling and All About Reading. He hates to read and spell, but loves both systems. He sneaks a read on the lessons in my teaching manuals. It really empowers him. I would recommend it for homeschoolers and as a supplement to those in school.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melanie,
Thank you for sharing how you came to use All About Reading and All About Spelling and how well it is working for your student!

Adeleke Temitope

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Awesome and unique method shared here.

Raena

says:

This has been an amazing post for me! One thing that always scared me was the thought of teaching my kids to read but tips and tools like these make it seem so simple and doable.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Raena,
We’re happy that this post has been encouraging to you. Teaching reading can be scary, but it doesn’t have to be!

Anastacia Simon

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Great tips!

Stacy Rivers

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Love this

Annette

says:

Love these tips

Elizabeth R.

says:

Great advice!

James Greene

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Awesome!

grace

says:

thank you for all your help teaching children to read

Tamara

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This is so helpful!

Shannon Schultz

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I am so thankful for AAR! My boy LOVES to read and I attribute it to the easy learning style of AAR! Thank you!

Erin Tierney

says:

Wish I’d had it this laid out when I was a student!

AngelaS

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I love that you supply extra teaching tips in your blog posts.

Lourie B

says:

I LOVE how both AAR am de AAS bien check easy programs to follow. Rules like these breaks it down to the child’s level, making it easier for keep da to
LEarn and retain.

Destiny

says:

Love these rules! Can’t wait until we’re at this stage!

Christy

says:

I love these hyphen rules. They always trip me up!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Christy,
When to hyphen or not is a tricky issue. We are glad to help!

Danielle

says:

Interesting, I cannot wait until we get this far!

Angel

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Love AAR! Works amazing for my homeschooler.

Melissa

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I am always amazed at how much I learn doing this curriculum!

Mary

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AAR has been a life saver for our homeschool!

Carrie

says:

So thorough and helpful! I love the step by step way I am able to teach my kiddo with AAR & AAS. Thank you!

Julisa

says:

What level are prefixes taught in? We are almost done with 1 and I need to purchase 2.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Julisa,
Prefixes are taught in All About Reading 3 and All About Spelling 3.

Julisa

says:

Thanks much!

Cara F

says:

Such a thorough explanation!

Ann

says:

So thankful for AAR and AAS that make teaching reading and spelling understandable and enjoyable!

Ryane

says:

This is great! We are on our third child using All About Reading/spelling and recommend it to others every chance we get. Thanks!

Carla

says:

I would love to try these with my daughter. She is struggling with reading.

Amber

says:

I love the support of posts like this. I feel much more confident about teaching my kids after reading an explanation with activities to help with mastery.

These activities are very good . I cannot wait to use them in my class. Thank you very much for sharing!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

We are happy to help you with your class, Enda.

Ceitleen E.

says:

I love how all about reading presents this. Such a great and easy way to teach prefixes.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Ceitleen.

Juanita Robinson

says:

Thanks for this! My son needs constant review on this so this is helpful.

Wendy

says:

I need to dig into this for my 7- and 4-year olds!

Elissa Hardy

says:

Love this, we are just starting prefixes

Alexis

says:

I love that you use different colors for parts of the word

Rainbow

says:

Thanks for all the teaching tips! I really enjoy them. ☺️

Rachael Hill

says:

Thank you for the helpful tips!

Kelly Grundhofer

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This will come in handy!!!

Heather Trowbridge

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I love your program. Thanks for all the helpful tips!

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LOVE your program!!

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So happy to have found your site

Rachel Neufeld

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Thanks so much for all the free resources!

Gail

says:

Love this program and respurces

Lacie

says:

I love the printable in this post

Renee

says:

Thank you so much for all of these helpful tips!

Andrea

says:

Great tips!

Amity

says:

Love it…love this curriculum

Nichole Burke

says:

Looks like a great way to learn!

Jessica

says:

I love that I’m finally learning all the rules to the English language along with my kids! I moved so much as a kid there were a lot of holes in my education that I hadn’t even realized.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jessica,
It might not have been your moving. I attended the same school district for 12 of my 13 school years (kinder through 12th, with 10th grade in another state), and I was not taught many of the concepts covered in All About Reading and All About Spelling.

Nicci

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Love your website

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Thank you for the opportunity to win a great curriculum that will last a life time.

Amber Stanwyck

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Thanks for this!

Sarah

says:

Thanks for the download!

Jennifer Wagner

says:

Thanks for the tips!

Alderamin

says:

Thank You, this is helpful

yasmine

says:

hello ,
please i want to know can we say “unconsidered” and way ?
can you please give me a rule for this situation ?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yasmine,
Yes, unconsidered is a proper word. Here is it’s definition. Here is the dictionary entry for the prefix un. It is added to adjectives and nouns, or verbs used as adjectives or nouns (participles).

Sirgute

says:

Thank you very much it’s helpful!

Diane Roberts

says:

Excellent! Thank You.

Barbara

says:

Your downloadable content is excellent
Thank you

fatima

says:

very very helpful ..loved it the way youve explained everything just awesome !

Rachael

says:

Thank you. Very helpful.

Norma Helton

says:

Thank you for the information. I plan on using your Word Flipper in a tutoring session for an adult reader. I think that cutting apart the words and prefixes to use separately to change the words will be helpful to the person that I am working with.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Norma,
Yes, having the words and prefixes separate in order to be able to move them around is a great way to learn prefixes. Our All About Reading and All About Spelling programs do something similar. We have the teacher build words with the letter tiles, then we have prefix tiles that have the entire prefix printed on one tile. This makes learning how to read and spell with prefixes very hands-on and memorable.

Neela

says:

It’s really very helpful

adonias

says:

i need help what is a runner superfix pre fore ante or post

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Adonias,
Our Prefix download includes pre, fore, ante, and post.

ante – means before. Examples: antecedent, anteroom, antebellum
fore – means before or in front of. Examples: forehead, forewarn, forecast
pre – means before. Examples: prevent, prefix, precede
post – means after. Examples: postpone, postdate, postscript

I can see where there can be confusion with ante, fore, and pre all meaning before. The reason why English has at least three prefixes that have the same meaning is that they come down to us from three different routes. Ante is from Latin, fore is from Old English, and pre is from Old French. Ante is most likely to be used in front of words with Latin origin, which is why it is mostly seen in academic words often related to medicine, science, the study of history, and so on. Fore is most likely to be used in front of words from Old English, and words that come down to us from Old English tend to be short, just one or two syllables. Lastly, pre is most likely to be used in front of words from Old French. However, this is just a generalization, as in English we are always forming new words and are free to choose prefixes as we want.

But i have a doubt which is differentiate between proper and improper sentences can you please explain

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tamanna,
Are you asking about how our programs teach how to differentiate between proper and improper sentences? The answer is that our programs do not teach this. Differentiating between proper and improper sentences, or between complete and incomplete sentences, is a grammar topic and All About Reading and All About Spelling do not teach grammar except when it directly relates to reading and spelling. For example, when the suffix -ed is taught, students do learn what past tense means and how some words change completely instead of simply taking on the suffix. However, the programs do not discuss parts of speech, punctuation, complete sentences, and so on.

I think this is what you are asking, but I am unsure. Please let me know if I misunderstood or if you have further questions.

Tanya

says:

Hi Robin,
I realize this may be off-topic, but can you recommend a comprehensive grammar course for lower and upper elementary students? We are first-time homeschoolers this year and love your reading and spelling programs, but are struggling to find a grammar program we love. (My second-grader is struggling with adjectives and my fourth-grader is finding it a challenge to decipher adjectives from adverbs.)
I thank you for any assistance you may offer.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tanya,
You may not be aware, but there are two schools of thought on studying grammar. The traditional way, which is to do grammar every year from lower elementary until, and maybe through, high school. However, there another approach is to wait to study grammar until the student is reading and writing pretty well, usually upper elementary or junior high. Then grammar is studied in depth for a shorter period, depending on the program it may be two to six years. I prefer the second approach, as it is difficult to teach things like adjectives to a child that is still learning beginning spelling and writing.

Anyway, there are a number of grammar programs available that have either multi-sensory components or an incremental approach. Some of the programs focus exclusively on grammar, while some include writing as well. Here are a few suggestions:

– Winston Grammar is a hands-on program with color-coded cards and is a two-year program generally aimed at students in 4th to 7th grades. My two students that didn’t struggle in school did well with this program, but I knew it wouldn’t be a good fit for my younger children that have struggled.

– Easy Grammar features an incremental approach and includes topics such as usage and punctuation, for 2nd grade through 12th grade.

– Essentials in Writing is described by author Matthew Stephens as a Math-U-See approach to writing. In the elementary levels, this program incorporates grammar with writing. The lessons are presented in short video segments of 3 to 5 minutes and then the student works on the concept that was taught. This is a multisensory and incremental program that is very easy to use. There are levels for 1st-12th grades.

– The Sentence Family is a simple and fun program that lasts less than a semester and is aimed at 3rd through 6th graders. The program uses drawing along with a storyline to teach the nine parts of speech and how they relate to each other. This is more of a beginning grammar program that will need to be followed up with something else. Still, it is very fun and is sort of a jump start on grammar. My children and I enjoyed this program very much.

– Fix It Grammar is incremental and uses short lessons. Each level teaches grammar using sentences from a single story, so there is the added fun of seeing the story slowly unfold. The teacher’s manual is very comprehensive and even includes advanced concepts so the teacher can answer questions a curious student may have. The youngest the program is recommended for is 3rd grade, although it is appropriate for older students as well. I have been using this for almost two years now and I am impressed by it and my children still enjoy it.

– Hands-On English with Linking Blocks is an intriguing program that uses wooden blocks and flashcards for a truly hands-on approach.

– Analytical Grammar teaches a mastery of grammar by working on it for short grammar focused units once a year for 2 to 3 years. Junior Analytical Grammar is for 4th or 5th graders, with Analytical Grammar for 6th to 9th graders.

This should give you a lot to consider. Please let me know if you have further questions.

Tanya

says:

Thank you, Robin,
I have looked at some of your suggestions and a few of them are new to me. My head is spinning, but I think your suggestions will be quite helpful. Both my boys respond to touch-feel -see. So I may start there.
Thank you again.

I really learned from your website it was great to read your given examples thanks for clearing my doubts

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Tamanna. Please let us know if you have any questions or more doubts we can possibly clear up.

leslie

says:

love your stuff

Nurjehan

says:

So useful and easy to teach the kids

Nurjehan.

Alba

says:

No entiendo el im ,in ,il, over, sub ,pre ,super .😣

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Alba,
Here is a website that explains English prefixes and suffixes.
Lección de inglés: Prefixes and Suffixes.

abbas

says:

Thanks for your lessons

Leo Chapman

says:

What does im mean?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Leo,
The prefix im means not, as in improper means not proper. The download in this blog post has a long list of prefixes and their meanings, including im.

Lilian

says:

Wow. This is fantastic. Introducing prefix un in my class level the first time and didn’t know how to break it down but this resource is just perfect and simple to comprehend and use. Thanks and keep it up.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

We’re glad you found this helpful, Lilian! You’re welcome.

Anosha wissundara

says:

Thanx a lot. ….you helped me lot

Lessa Smith Croley, MS,CCC-SLP

says:

This is a great resource.

thanks prefixes you help me
\

Deep

says:

We r studying this right now in AAR3. Love it!

Melinda Ryan

says:

Yeah, this practical resource will help sell the active teaching of prefixes to our teachers.

Christina Smit

says:

Thank you for the great teaching tips.

jennifer

says:

Thank you so much for creating such a wonderful curriculum that successfully teaches every aspect of reading and spelling – even prefixes! We love it!

Anne J

says:

Great suggestions – thank you!

Lauren

says:

This is helpful and interesting. I am using pre reading and loving it. I think we are sticking with this for the long haul. Thank you!

Amy

says:

We have been struggling with prefixes right now. Thanks for the info!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Amy,
You are welcome. Let us know if there is any specific concepts are causing the struggles that aren’t covered fully here.

Martha England

says:

Love this. Thanks!

Jill Morris

says:

I’m learning more from your posts than I learned in public school!

Rosanne

says:

Thanks for this! Bookmarking for when we’re studying prefixes.

Erin

says:

Great ideas! thanks!

Laura

says:

This makes prefixes so much more clear for me, which makes it in turn more clear for the kiddos. Thank you!

Audrey J.

says:

This is helpful. Thanks.

Sherry

says:

This is very helpful! We have gone over a few Latin stems as prefixes in Language, but this makes it more clear. Thank you!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Sherry. I hope you find it very helpful with your students.

pam havens

says:

You guys make teaching easier thank you

Destiny

says:

So helpful. Thank you!

Jen

says:

Thank you!

Alicia Kayser

says:

Thank you. These are great tool for us that learn at home!

Sandrine

says:

Thank you for sharing this great tip and also for the free list of prefixes..

christina davis

says:

I love this program and love learning things that I don’t remember learning in school!

Sheila C

says:

I love the All About Spelling program. My son is becoming a great speller and I’m learning things I never knew about spelling rules, too.

Sheri

says:

I am looking forward to include the All About Spelling in my classroom in order to assist my struggling students with an alternate approach.
Thank you.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Sheri,
This sound great! Let us know if we can help in any way. For example, we have a pdf document that discusses implementing All About Spelling in a classroom setting. If you email us at support@allaboutlearningpress.com, we can email it back to you.

Agnes

says:

This is our first year homeschooling and I can’t say enough about All ABout Reading. My son who used to have tears when it came to reading is now saying that reading is his favorite subject. Thanks you s o much for this awesome program!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Agnes,
This is wonderful! It really feels all of us here at AALP with joy to hear that we are helping to make this kind of difference in students! I’ll be sharing this with the whole team. Thank you.

Carmen Magargee

says:

Thank you for the helpful information!

Linda

says:

Thanks for the list and the information!

Tritia

says:

I keep hearing great things about this program. I can’t wait to try it out!

Sharon Pine

says:

Yes, I think we would benefit from this.

Kim D

says:

Yes and yes!

Stacy

says:

Great advice! Thanks!!!

Amber

says:

This is good information! Very easy to understand in order to teach in a way that is also easy to understand. Thank you!

Mary

says:

This is actually really important “word work,” and many students need to first come to grips with the fact that a prefix always comes before a word to extend or change its meaning. I like to have them learn the meanings of the prefixes, then try to create some of their own new words. I find that very often suffixes and spelling give them way more trouble, and starting with prefixes makes good sense.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Mary,
Yes! We teach prefixes first, because they are simpler to learn and set the students up for understanding suffixes and the more complex rules about adding suffixes.

Robyn D

says:

Yes! Love the prefix game. A good handle on prefixxes and suffixes helps so much with later reading comprehension, as well.

Helene

says:

I also categorize ing and est, among others, as suffixes becuz they change the root word often. So the student encounters suffixes early too. It’s an intro only, but the terms become less scary the more you use them. Half the battle of any subject is the terminology. Here it’s the “grammar” of grammar lol but say, in biology, once you know the grammar–the terms, you’re a huge distance ahead.

Sage

says:

I just received my first All-About-Learning product, today! I am so excited to start your spelling program with my 3rd grade daughter. Thank you for all your wonderful products and ideas. I know this info on teaching prefixes will come in handy!

Sarah H

says:

Thank you. I absolutely love this blog, it is a valuable source which helps me to improve my homeschool outcomes.

Gail Timmer

says:

I am so happy that I looked at All
About Reading. It fits perfectly into my thoughts on teaching reading and spelling. It is like finding a good friend!

Thank you VERY much for your excellent lesson plans and worksheets. I really appreciate your teaching resources and advice. I plan to use the vocabulary and spelling lessons with my adult ESOL students as well as adapt them for my K-2 students! Thanks, again, for sharing your work!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Alison,
You are welcome. Thank you for all you do!

Michelle

says:

Excited to try the flippers with my daughter!

Tina

says:

No-one taught me this, and I am excited to share it with my student. Thank-you very much for the information

Juli Vrotney

says:

This is so needful. Thank you.

Lorraine Douglas

says:

Thanks for sharing. It is great to have all this information in one place.

Rachel Forbes

says:

This makes sense!

Kelly Burr

says:

As a high school English teacher I see little things like this all of the time. It’s crazy. Thanks for sharing!

Sarah Marie

says:

This is very, very helpful for both reading and spelling! Thank you for the handy list!

Noemi Enriquez

says:

Thank you for this. Although I am not homeschooling my kids, I am always on the lookout on materials I can use to enrich their learning.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Noemi,
While most of our customers are homeschoolers, not all are. We aim to help parents, teachers, and tutors help their students, regardless of their schooling choices. Enjoy this lesson!

Brenda F.

says:

My daughter and I just started AAS book 4. We’ll be tackling prefixes in a few weeks. Thanks for the tips and chart.

Bethany Bechtold

says:

You’ve made it so much easier to understand when and when not to use a hyphen. Thanks!! We love AAR and AAS.

Penny

says:

I love AAS! When I took my son out of public school, we started with level 1 and he has shown so much improvement! Thanks so much for these tips!

Christine Dean

says:

These teaching tools have been a great help. We are new to homeschooling and it can be so overwhelming when you aren’t sure where to start or what to move on to next. Thanks again!

Phyllis

says:

Thanks for sharing these teaching tools with us homeschoolers.

Colleen

says:

Thanks for all of the great extras that make your program even more user friendly!

Lynette

says:

Love this printable chart to keep for quick reference. Thanks!

Tiffany

says:

I love your posts. My child with dysgraphia is doing so much better with your spelling program. The only concern I have is when I print your articles, like this one, it ALWAYS cuts off the last inch of the right column, which I hate. Your information is wonderful. Thanks for all the work you do.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Tiffany,
Can you give us more details about this printing problem? I want our tech support to look into, but they will want to know what browser you are using and such. When you say print the article, do you mean the pdf in the article (the 90 prefixes pages), or do you print this blog post? I’m not sure what you mean by the right column either. Do you mean the side bar we have on the right that has links to other things, like our Dyslexia Resources page and Picture Book Review Library?

Hopefully, we can get this problem solved.

Laura N.

says:

This was so helpful! I wish I had learned these as a kid!!

Angela

says:

My daughter, who is 12 years old and has been recently diagnosed with Dyslexia. I am currently homeschooling her and she became very upset a couple of months ago when she was teased by first graders that she couldn’t spell. She asked me to teach her how to spell. The All About Spelling curriculum was recommended to me by my sister-in-law and I purchased Level 1. My daughter ABSOLUTELY LOVES THIS CURRICULUM! She asks to begin her day with Spelling! This curriculum has given her an excitement and the confidence to learn! I can’t begin to thank you enough for this curriculum!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Angela,
This is WONDERFUL!

Milissa

says:

Great information very concisely presented. Thanks!

Kerri

says:

All about Learning has been a game changer for me. In 1st grade my daughter was struggling to keep up in public school. Her self-confidence had been squashed and every subject was tears and hopelessness. My husband and I decided to bring her home and homeschool her. I started her with level 1 and now, 2 years later, she loves to read and spell because she gets it. Thank you for all you do.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Kerri,
Thank you so much for sharing your daughter’s reading and spelling success with us!

Renee

says:

Wow this is so helpful, thank you!

olivia

says:

I would like to know if I need to have all about reading to correlate with all about spelling? I used prek and level 1, and then found my children no longer needed help or training in reading, do to a classical method I use. We love the book readers. If the readers have the same words as the spellers I would like to know.I want to be fully prepared and fully backing up everything am doing.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Olivia,
You do not need to correlate your work in All About Reading with All About Spelling. There is a lot of overlap between the two, but it is best to allow the student to work at their own unique pace in each. Most children move faster in reading, but need more time to master spelling. This article, Why We Teach Reading and Spelling Separately, explains this further. This article, What’s the Difference Between AAR & AAS?, goes a step further and includes sample lessons from each program showing how they approach the concept of words with the KN phonogram differently.

I hope this helps, but please let me know if I can give more information.

Evelyn Barge

says:

The information is informative and concise. Just the way I like it.

Sarah Jackson

says:

We just started AAR and my son loves it! I can’t wait to get into AAS too!

Renee Seats

says:

Thanks for this great post. I love your program.

Mahmoud Sultan

says:

Thank you very much for your kind and constructive efforts

Maria Martinez

says:

Great lesson, thank you Marie!

circe

says:

Thanks for the list of pre fixes. It will be very helpful for all age in our house.

Mary

says:

Thanks so much! You always have the best bonus resources!

Kerrie Craig

says:

Thank you, this will help!

Amanda Carnes

says:

This is so awesome to try new things when homeschooling. I love doing hands on with my children and using visuals to capture their attention.

T. McD.

says:

Thank you for the Prefix list. My child took a school test and there were some questions on prefix. Unfortunately he didn’t know it, and it made me feel so bad. This list came just on time! I am going to work on them with him. Your blog posts are very helpful.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome! I think if you work through the information in this post that your child will have a better understanding of prefixes than most. I’m glad it was timely for you.

NotableNarrations

says:

It feels odd or bad that I don’t remember ever being taught this in school. I understand the general principle, but I don’t have any memory of lessons on it.

Ana

says:

We excited to use AAR 2 and AAS1 this fall. Thank you for the explanation and the list. I actually was unaware of the 6 Rules for Using Hyphens with Prefixes.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Ana,
I know! I learned a thing or two in this blog post as well!

Robyn D

says:

Great resource list! Excellent guide for teaching prefixes. Thanks for sharing.

Julie

says:

My son enjoys the AAS lessons and is really learning a lot!

Colleen Hosey

says:

Thanks for the ideas. I didn’t realize there were so many prefixes. We will be starting on them next week.

Stephanie Miller

says:

I love AAS. It has really helped my dyslexic daughter with her spelling and reading!

Sarah Rottman

says:

Thank you for the great ideas!

Missy Wainman

says:

So excited to start AAR soon! Just ordered it and got confirmation of it being shipped. Looking forward to adding AAS to our routine too! Level 1 would be great!

Jaime Schmidt

says:

Thanks for the list and review of how to teach prefixes! Discussing the meaning of the prefix helps :)

Melissa G

says:

This could definitely make things easier!

Dee Neal

says:

Love all about reading! Using it right now with my 3rd grader & will begin level 1 with my 1st grader in the fall. Would love to win all about spelling level 1 for my 1st grader! :)

Lisa

says:

I don’t recall ever being taught prefixes, but I think my students will really benefit from it!

Angela Roman

says:

I love all about learning!

Joleene

says:

Love All About Reading. Thanks for all the great tips!

Amy

says:

Great tips! Love this!

Cher Adams

says:

Thank you so much for making my children AND me love reading and spelling lessons!

Andrea

says:

Tons of great tips, thank u!

Paige Newcomb

says:

I love your tips

Cheree

says:

I love your blog posts explaining things like this! There’s going to be a lot of learning happening around here – and not just the kids! I’m actually looking forward to learning this (over again) for myself!

carissa

says:

love the list! This will be a great help!

Margaret

says:

Can’t wait to try this out.

Tracy Kocsis

says:

this is a fabulous resource to use both at school and when homeschooling my own children. Thanks so much!

I just printed this out to use with a small group of kids I work with. I know that recognizing suffixes quickly is the best first step to help the words to “fall apart” in front of their eyes into meaningful parts instead of just a jumble of meaningless/confusing letters.

Kali

says:

Thank you for the resources! New customer here. :)

Deanne

says:

Thank you for all the resources you provide that help augment and support the program! I am only three weeks into the homeschooling adventure, and I am so grateful my friend and neighbor shared your program with me. The light bulbs going off in my 2nd grader’s head are 100 watts, for sure! She has had an articulation disorder since age 3, so spelling has always been her Achilles heel, since she pronounced words differently. Segmenting and rules are simple as when to use /c/ and /k/ to produce the /s/ sound have been life savers for both of us. This is one more tool that I am confident will aid in her success. Thank you, sincerely.

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Deanne,
I’m so glad we can be a help and support to you as you begin your homeschooling journey! Please let us know if we can help you in any way.

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