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Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

Learning to read isn’t always easy, even under the best of circumstances. But what if you have a child with a significant learning disability like Down syndrome? What’s the best way to teach reading in that situation?

Jennifer is a real mom with a real child with Down syndrome. But Jennifer and her husband didn’t let the fact that their son Joseph had Down syndrome stop them from believing that they could homeschool him.

And it didn’t stop Jennifer from believing that she could teach Joseph to read.

But she knew that she needed to find the right resources to help her special child, because even though it may be a challenge to teach a child with Down syndrome to read, with the right approach, even children with significant learning disabilities can learn to read.

This adorable little boy and his very determined mom are proof of that!

Here’s Jennifer …

Joseph has Down syndrome. Being the fifth child in our clan, it only seemed natural to us to homeschool him just like his older brothers and sisters. However, the rest of the world doesn’t always agree.

There’s a common belief that children with special circumstances need special education teachers. But we chose to homeschool Joseph because it’s what we know how to do. We’re comfortable with homeschooling, and after living with Joseph for five years, it didn’t seem like it would be much different homeschooling him with Down syndrome than it was homeschooling his siblings.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

But after teaching four children to read using various methods, I wasn’t convinced that any of those open-ended methods would work for Joseph. And with our history of dyslexia (two out of four children), I wanted to find a reading program that was well laid out, specific in its instruction, multisensory-based, and dyslexia approved, and that still allowed for flexibility.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

Reading Lessons That Work!

When I first looked through the All About Reading Level 1 parent guide, I immediately noticed the number of lessons—49. Only 49! So many reading programs plan for 180 days, or 36 weeks of lessons. To get through that many seemed nearly impossible. Forty-nine sounded so very doable.

Once we began Lesson 1 and I realized I had to break the lesson up into multiple mini-lessons, I knew I had made the right choice with AAR.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

Each lesson is divided into multiple segments including “Before You Begin,” “Review,” “New Teaching,” and “Read-Aloud Time.” “Before You Begin” is perfect for the novice parent/teacher; it prepares you, in fewer than three minutes, to teach the lesson. The short prep time means more time actually reading with Joseph.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

The “New Teaching” section is also comprised of smaller sections. I love that we can sit down for 7-12 minutes and complete one section, such as “Change the Word.” It’s a very short lesson, but anything over 15 minutes and Joseph’s eyes are too tired to continue.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading and Down Syndrome

The “Read Aloud” reminder is helpful. We all know how important reading aloud is, but with a pile of kids in multiple grades to homeschool, sometimes this cuddly, happy activity gets pushed aside for other, more important subjects. Before we begin the lesson, Joseph picks a book off the shelf and sets it next to him as a reminder to us both that a story will be read once the lesson is complete—a little motivation for him.

The Ease of Scripted Lesson Plans

Homeschooling Joseph takes a lot of my brain power, and having the AAR script ready is such a blessing to my well-being. It’s one less activity I have to plan, and on hectic days it’s so nice to grab the bag, open the book, and begin. I wasn’t sure if I’d like that, but it helps me stay on track and not say too much.

Experiencing a beginning reader read his first sentence out of a book is a joyful moment worthy of celebration. Hearing Joseph read his first sentence from the Run, Bug, Run! reader brought tears to my eyes, and I’m so happy All About Reading helped that happen.

Products Jennifer has used with Joseph:

Read more on Jennifer’s blog about how she is using All About Reading to teach Joseph how to read:

Watch as Jennifer teaches Joseph in the videos below:

Did you enjoy Jennifer’s story? Read more stories from Real Moms and Real Kids.

Do you have a child with Down syndrome or another significant learning disability? Jennifer would love to connect with you in the comments below.

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Jennifer Bailey

says:

Hi Jennifer. We recently reached out to the team at All About Spelling with a request for information about the suitability of AAS for our son (13 years old with Down syndrome). Our son is reading well, but his spelling is atrocious and we are looking for a scripted set of lessons that will teach him the rules and take the guesswork out of our lesson planning. Currently, we are using a variety of activities (tactile, copying, interactive apps), but our son does not retain his spelling (dropping vowels is a real problem). Are you able to recommend the AAS program for our son? He is a “rule follower”, but would not be able to learn multiple rules at the same time. So, wondering about that, too. Thank you for any feedback and advice you may have to offer!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jennifer,
I know your questions were specfically to Jennifer, Joseph’s mom, but it can take her some time to see the questions that come up here as this isn’t her own blog. If you haven’t already, consider contacting her direction through her blog, Camp Homeschool or her YouTube channel, A Country Life.

I can let you know that All About Spelling is designed to be used at each student’s unique pace, so you can go through it as slowly as your son needs to master each rule or concept before beginning to learn the next one. It also includes on-going review, so previously learned concepts are not forgotten.

And if you order directly through us, we have a one-year “Go Ahead and Use It” money-back guarantee. This means you can use All About Spelling for months and still return it for your money back if you find it just isn’t a good fit for your son. We don’t want anyone to be stuck with something that isn’t working!

Please let me know if you have additional questions or need more information.

Jennifer

says:

Thank you!

Iris

says:

Hi, I have a 9 yo boy with Down syndrome too, he is reading sight words but I am stuck on the transition to more complex reading. My challenge is that he severely speech challenged. Could this program work if he can’t speak clearly?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

It might, Iris. We have had reports from parents and tutors of children with apraxia of speech that working through All About Reading has helped as it provides lots of opportunities for having the student repeat the teacher, it teaches the sounds of phonograms which can help make how words should sound easier to understand, and it provides lots and lots of fun topics of conversation.

Be sure to go over our Placement Tests before beginning, however. Since he has been learning sight words, he may not be ready for level 1. He may need the Pre-reading level to learn the alphabet and its sounds, as well as other Reading Readiness skills.

In case you didn’t know, we offer a one-year money-back “Go Ahead and Use It” guarantee. All About Reading might work well with your son, but we don’t want you to feel stuck with it if it doesn’t work out.

Let me know if you need help with placement or anything else.

Kimberly

says:

This is a very helpful article. Thank you.

Merry

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Kimberly! Have fun teaching your child to read and let us know if you have any questions along the way. 😊

Chelsea

says:

Love this my daughter is 6 , with ds and loves books!

Linda Shemenski

says:

I love Jennifer, her courageous spirit and willingness to home school her son with Downs Syndrome. Bravo!

Adeela

says:

I have 10 years old girl with down syndrome,she go to an inclusive school from 5 years
Now the problem i am facing is her daily routine is get up early in the morning take a bath but she don’t want to go to school she starts shouting and crying loudly however i take her school like this daily, but she dont recognize alphabet after D and she cant hold pencil and she cant write only the thing she want to do is colouring
What should i do for make her learning and live a normal life

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Adeela,
I am so sorry your child is not doing well. It tears my heart to hear how upset she gets daily. It sounds like she needs more one-on-one help than she may be receiving.

Maybe you could work with her to help learn. We have numerous preschool helps and free resources through our blog. Yes, she is older than preschool age, but from what you describe that is the level of material she needs to learn. Plus, our preschool materials focus on fun and playful learning, which should help her be more willing to do it.

I hope this helps some. Please let me know if you have further questions or need more information.

Ashleigh

says:

So thankful I found your blog!
Homeschooling our kindergartener this year (with Ds) and have been torn on what to do for reading! Thank you for sharing so much! It’s so helpful! Would love to connect and see what else has really worked for you and your son!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Ashleigh,
I’m so happy this has been helpful for you! I’m happy to help in any way I can. Also, you can follow Jennifer directly through her blog Camp Homeschool and through her YouTube channel A Country Life. It looks like she has been doing more videos than blogging lately.

Do you have any specific concerns or questions as you get started with your new kindergartner this year? 😊

Sabrina Crews

says:

Hello my daughter is about to be10 I do not home school I just simply have to work but I want use time this summer to help her. She knows sight words from school and can read a little bit just has trouble remembering. Also has trouble when she see a sight word outside of school or the normal and she gets nervous thinking it’s another word. What are some suggestions for reading and math ?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m happy for the opportunity to help you help your daughter, Sabrina!

Having trouble with remembering what has been learned is very common among all children, but can be especially problematic for those with special needs. We have a Memory Report that discusses five aspects of memory and gives concrete tips to help you help your child remember more easily. In addition, reviewing frequently is essential and even just 5 minutes of reviewing most days of the week can have a huge impact. Our blog post How to Make Reading and Spelling “Stick” will also be helpful.

Learning the sounds phonograms make and the skills to sound words out will be useful for your daughter, especially when she is unsure of a word. It will give her tools to check if she is remembering the word correctly or not. All About Reading teaches these and many parents use it with their children that are in school, often after the school day but also during school breaks.

You could do something similar with a homeschool math program as well. When looking for a math program, I think you will have the best success with a program that makes use of a lot of hands-on learning and manipulatives. There are a number of options like that available. Let me know if you need specific suggestions.

The mom in this post, Jennifer, checks this periodically but you will be able to reach her more quickly on her personal blog, Camp Homeschool. I know that she is happy to help other parents help their children succeed as best as they can.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Dee

says:

Please could you offer specific suggestions for math programs?
TIA!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sure, Dee. However, I will add that I have no personal experience with teaching a child with Down Syndrome. These are some suggestions that I know work with those that need more incremental and hands-on learning, but you may also consider asking Jennifer what she uses with her son. I linked to her blog above.

Math-U-See makes use of hands-on manipulative to help make math less abstract and more concrete. It also is a mastery-based approaching, allowing you to move on to the next concept quickly if your child masters the lesson quickly, or more slowly if your child needs more time.

Right Start Math makes extensive use of hands-on manipulatives and has a reputation for being fun and engaging.

Touch Math is one I only recently have heard of but it is highly visual and hands-on specifically designed for those that have struggled with math.

Teaching Textbooks is one that Marie used with her student that struggled with math. It isn’t really hands-on, but it is incremental and many student enjoy the computer-based lessons.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you need anything else.

Sajjad

says:

May I have

Mary

says:

Got through our first year homeschooling our 13 year old with down syndrome. It didn’t feel very successful, when I mentioned starting our new year she tells me she hates school and gives no interest in learning. She reads some sight words. I’m not sure how I’m gonna get her interest back enough to help her learn to read. any suggestions. I’ll definitely be looking into this program. Thanks

Jennifer

says:

Hi Mary, It’s Jennifer, Joe’s mom. Some days Joseph, as well as my other kids, doesn’t show a whole lot of interest. On days like that I try to find alternative methods of learning. Cooking and talking about fractions, reading books and talking about the subject matter, going for a walk and turning it into a scavenger hunt or simply watching a PBS special on animals or something else that’s interesting. I’ll still sneak in some table work between activities, but it’s more of an “oh we should do this quick” kind of thing. Hope this helps a little.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Mary,
I’m sorry to hear your first year didn’t go well. It can be so hard with motivation and enthusiasm for learning is lacking. You may find our blog post on 9 Ways to Keep Reading and Spelling Lessons Motivating helpful. It’s very important when working with unmotivated students to keep your lessons short and have a variety of activities ready. All About Reading helps with both of these.

The mom in this blog post, Jennifer, writes and does videos occasionally about teaching her son Joseph. Here is her blog post titled Tools I Use to Teach My Child With Down Syndrome to Read.

If you have any questions or concerns along the way, just ask! I want to help you help your daughter.

Leah Rowley

says:

I am currently homeschooling my son with Down syndrome, he is 11 alomkst 12. I have been thinking of using All About be Reading and Spelling.

Jennifer

says:

Leah, I share homeschooling videos of Joseph and I working through his lessons on YouTube at A Country Life. You may find those helpful if you’re on the fence about All About REading.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Leah,
Do you have any questions? I’m happy to help in any way I can.

Also, Jennifer has even more information (and lots of videos) of her work with her son on her blog, Camp Homeschool.

Please let us know how we can help you help your son.

Ronita

says:

I need help lol I’m afraid I’m being to hard on my daughter sometimes as well as I think I am teaching my daughter to hate learning time. I’m new to homeschool but I’m sure already that I’ve watched her advance tremendously since we started. I just want to make sure I don’t make costly mistakes nor make her hate learning new things by spending to much time on one subject. Please help 🙂

Jennifer

says:

Ronita, Robin E. gave excellent input. The only thing I might add is to keep a favorite picture book handy. As soon as you notice your child loosing interest in the lesson push just a little bit more and then break to the book. This is a tactic I use and then after reading I’ll usually attempt another couple of minutes of the lesson. Hugs and kisses and it’s over. Homeschooling require so much effort and any way to make it enjoyable for everyone involved is a very good thing.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Ronita,
I happy to hear that you are seeing tremendous advancement since you have started homeschooling!

I understand the tendency to push too hard at times. It is because we want our children to be the best they can be! It’s a good thing, but we must be careful that it doesn’t lead to frustration for us or our children.

Keep your lesson times short. We recommend just 20 minutes a day, but if your daughter starts to get tired or have struggles toward the end of 20 minutes, cut the time even shorter. You want to be able to end each day on a positive, successful note. Sometimes that means you will need to back up to an earlier concept or something that is easy right before you end a lesson. We have found that short lessons done consistently are very effective for long-term progress.

Our blog post on Ways to Keep Reading and Spelling Motivating may be helpful to you.

I’m sure Jennifer will have some insight to add as well.

Sandy Myers

says:

My grandson is 15 and very smart and he also has Downs Syndrome. He can write but I’m trying to find the right books for teaching him reading.

Jennifer

says:

Sandy, Robin E is spot on with using the AAR placement tests. Once you are comfortable with his ability to sound out simple phonetic words, I would encourage you share some of Margaret Hillert’s Beginning to Read books with your grandson. There are phonetic words and Dolch sight words in those books. My son Joe is so visual and learns sight words quickly. Phonics, although super important, requires A LOT of focus and brain power so I like to switch it up. We do AAR phonics based learning one day and then sight word books the next day. I believe both methods of learning are valuable for our children. Good luck and please check out my blog and search “Down syndrome” or “reading” for more tips on teaching reading to kids with Down syndrome.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sandy,
Even though your grandson is older than Jennifer’s son, I still think All About Reading may be a great tool for you to help him learn to read. It is set up to be used at the individual student’s unique pace, so you can move faster through the things your grandson doesn’t need to spend as much time on, but move as slowly as he needs in the other areas.

Does he read at all? If he is reading some, we have placement tests for All About Reading to help you decide which level would be best. Also, we recommend having him read the sample stories from the previous level online as a further confirmation. You want him to be reading fluently with good comprehension before going to a higher level.

Level 1 sample story
Level 2 sample story
Level 3 sample story
Level 4 sample story

Evaluate (without correcting your grandson) for the following…

His ability to decode the words in the story.
His ability to comprehend the story.
Could he fluently read the story with expression?
Did he understand the words from a vocabulary standpoint?

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Maria

says:

Hi Jennifer, I have a 9 year old son with Down Syndrome. He is the youngest of 10 children and I am home-schooling him as I have all my children. Some days are so rewarding and encouraging, other days not so much. Today he tied a shoelace completely by himself and did a great job! This was a good day, I am using AAR pre-reading among other things in his curriculum. Any advice you are willing to share would be appreciated. Thank you, Maria

Jennifer

says:

Homeschooling any child has its rewarding and not so rewarding days. Throw in an extra chromosome and those rewarding days can send your happy emotions through the roof. That same chromosome can make the not so rewarding days even more devastating and trying. My best advice is to stay the course just like you’ve been doing with all your other (10) children. Easier said than done, right?! More practically speaking, set three small goals for the month and try to keep everything you do with your son working towards accomplishing those goals. I don’t know where your son’s at, but maybe a goal could be – By the end of the month I want ____________ to accurately match all capital letters with lower case letters. Then during the month find as many ways as you can to practice that skill. This is how I approach Joseph’s education and it really helps to keep me focused on what he’s accomplishing and not on my frustrations with what he’s not doing. I hope this helps. Good luck with your family. You can always check out my blog for more about homeschooling with Down syndrome.

Joanna

says:

You are wonderful! Oh, thank you for posting this! I have been looking for assistance everywhere to something that would work in homeschooling my son, Daniel, who is 5 years old and barely speaking words, but he wants to learn. I am going to be leaving my work pretty soon, (after 20 years of seniority with the same company). We are going to be missing the pay and the insurance, but I am aching to teach him and pour all I have into him. Thank you.

Jennifer

says:

It’s been 3 years of using All About Reading with Joseph and he is still progressing. It might be slow, but it is so rewarding to be THE ONE watching him learn to read. Good luck to you and Daniel. Enjoy the journey!!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Joanna,
We are so pleased to hear you found this encouraging. We want you to be encouraged! Please let us know if you need anything or have additional questions.

Heidi R

says:

Reading this was such an encouragement to us as we have been trying to find something that would work for our 8 year old son who has Down syndrome. Thank you for sharing your experience! We’re looking forward to giving this a try.

Jennifer

says:

I’m so glad you found this encouraging. As a mommy blogger that’s always my hope that I will offer encouragement to other homeschooling parents, especially those teaching their child with Down syndrome.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Heidi,
We are pleased to hear this was encouraging to you, as encouragement was definitely one of our goals in writing this! Please let us know if you have questions, concerns, or need anything.

Lupi Wilhelm

says:

We love AAR! I saw a night and day difference in my son’s reading after doing AAR Level 1.

Ridhima

says:

Hi Jennifer
I read your blog and was absolutely thrilled. I have a daughter 5.5 years old Aahana with Down syndrome. Thank you for inspiring me . :))

Jennifer

says:

AAR is still going strong in our homeschool. I hope it works well for your daughter and that you enjoy the journey.

Jo Thompson

says:

Thanks

Dee Ruiz

says:

Jennifer, I just want to say that I think you’re doing a wonderful thing & I love it, you & Joseph for working SO hard. I’m telling myself it WOULD be difficult, but not with A LOT OF LOVE LIKE YOU’VE GOT FOR HIM. and if you’ll back me up by return message, I know you’ll want to tell me it’s well worth it!! Congratulations on making a terrific life for you & your family. I wish I had the strength. Love, Dee

Jennifer

says:

Thanks, Dee. It is hard work, but the reward is oh so good.

Rebecca Everitt

says:

My son is 8 and also had Down Syndrome. We are using AAR..just like we used with his older 2 sisters. He knows all his letters, all their sounds, and is getting better and better at blending them into words. Even the sounds he had trouble making in speech he’s still able to read!

Jennifer

says:

I am always amazed at the words that Joseph can sound out and say perfectly while reading his AAR books. He doesn’t always use such great enunciation while speaking in normal conversation, but I know it’s coming. Every time Grandma talks to him she says she can hear improvement in his speech. Keep up the great work with your son. Enjoy the journey!!!

Dee Ruiz

says:

Sounds perfect. I’m so glad to read it. I’ve not had any experience but I love to hear the story. Lol, Dee

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Awesome, Rebecca! It sounds like your son is doing very well!

Ileana

says:

Hi,
I have a 6 year old boy with Ds. I’ve used flash cards and sight words. But he’s pretty much just memorizing what he ge word looks like. I want to teach him how to really read. The program I gave us called Special Reads. It’s pricey and each stage is another couple of hundred dollars. Do you have suggestions on how I can go about teaching him how to become a real reader? Thank you!

Jennifer

says:

Ileana,

Thanks for commenting and asking this question. It’s a common concern for many parents of children with Down syndrome. I firmly believe a mix of phonics and sight word reading is super important for teaching ANY child to read. Phonics based reading such as AAR is admittedly slow going for my son who is now 8.5. But I won’t give up because sounding out words is so important. However, his progress on memorizing sight words is definitely something for him to cheer about. I’ve been using the Margaret Hillert readers. They are chock full of sight words (many of which are phonetically spelled so they can be sounded out if need be) and are limited in the number of words each book contains. I believe ‘The Three Pigs’ has the least amount of words with only 34 different words throughout the book. Being able to recognize sight words quickly is a great skill and surely makes the new reader enjoy their reading experience. Let’s face it, we all yearn for our child to read – what level will they top out at? Who knows. Will they become a reader because of their Phonics lessons? Will they become a reader because of their sight word recognizing skills? Most likely both will contribute to their reading ability.

I can’t speak to the Special Reads program because I’ve never seen it, but I do know that AAR level 1 with the addition of Hillert’s sight word readers is working for us. Joe can take a Hillert book to bed with him, even one he’s never read before, and read before bed. As I listen in he doesn’t get every word right, but I hear him quickly read words in a row, as well as sound out words. That’s my goal for him, to use the skills I’ve taught him, to read.

For more ways I use AAR please visit my blog, http://www.camphomeschool.blogspot.com and search Down syndrome or AAR.

adnan

says:

you are awesome mother

Jill Dudley

says:

Hello! My fifth child is 9 months old and was born with Ds. After he was diagnosed, I immediately thought he would be my first child to go to a brick and mortar school. I have since entertained the idea that I can homeschool this sweetie too – but I’m still not convinced that will be best for him. So, I’m going to be spending the next few years researching more about educating people with Down syndrome – and I’m glad I’ve found you as a resource!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jill,
Congratulations on a 5th baby! I’m glad that we could direct you to Jennifer as a resource as you research homeschooling your newest little one.

Jen

says:

We are a homeschooling family, and our fifth child (9 weeks) has Down Syndrome. We are still finding our new normal, but this was very encouraging.

Jennifer

says:

Congratulations on the new baby. I can almost smell that sweet little head. I know exactly what you are talking about when you say “finding our new normal”. Joseph is our 5th child as well. He’ll be 8 in August and although belligerent, overly independent, and hard-headed, he’s also loving, compassionate, and always willing to share. I guess he’s a perfectly normal (almost) 8 year old.

If you are in need of encouragement or simply have questions, I’d be happy to share what I know. You can find me @camphomeschool on FB and message me. Happy Summer!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jen,
Congratulations on the new baby!

I’m glad you find this encouraging. You’ll find your new normal soon enough, and when the time comes to teach your newest little one to read we’ll be here!

Regina miller

says:

My child is disability she has speech and ot with her hand I am homeschooling her and trying to help her learn reading and math can you help me what do you think.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Regina,
Here are some ways that All About Reading can help kids with learning difficulties:

– Each lesson time is simple and explicit, and will include 3 simple steps: review of what was learned the day before, a simple new teaching, and a short practice of that new teaching.

– Incremental lessons. AAR breaks every teaching down into its most basic steps and then teaches the lessons in a logical order, carrying the students from one concept or skill to the next. Each step builds on the one the student has already mastered.

– AAR is multisensory. Research has shown that when a child is taught through all three pathways at the same time, a method known as simultaneous multisensory instruction, he will learn significantly more than when taught only through his strongest pathway.

– AAR uses specially color-coded letter tiles. Working with the All About Reading letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept.

– AAR is scripted, so you can concentrate on your child. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage.

– AAR has built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning difficulties generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. With AAR, your child will have a Reading Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows.

– AAR has lots of fluency practice. One of the things that Marie noticed when she was researching reading programs is that few programs have enough review built in for kids who struggle to gain fluency. AAR has fluency sheets or a story to be read with every lesson, so children can practice reading smoothly with expression and confidence.

All About Reading has a one-year guarantee. You can try it, and if for any reason you feel that it isn’t the right match for your child, return it for a full refund.

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Jody Catalanotte

says:

Working with students with Down’s has been some of the most rewarding work of my career.

Wendy Johnson

says:

Thank You! I’m a homeschool mom of 12. Addie is the 12th and she has Down syndrome. She is almost 7 and her memory recall is short (age 2). I am sure I haven’t done enough with her. I’ve been torn between flashcard sight reading and phonics. It’s good to know that you’ve taught phonics and it worked. I’m going to start pre-reading with her!

Jennifer @ Camp Homeschool

says:

Wendy, it seems all of us moms think we never do enough. What’s with that? Many days I have to remind myself that I’ve loved my child, fed my child, clothed my child, prayed for my child, and disciplined my child and THAT IS ENOUGH. With that said, I do know that we desire to do so much more for our children. Reading is a great place to start. I’ve had tremendous success using phonics. It’s slow, but very steady. I would encourage you to find a place for both, phonics and sight words. AAR level 1 includes Leap Words, which are really just basic sight words: the, of, etc. Joseph loves these, especially when I make a BINGO matching game with the words. I throw in a couple extras just for fun: love, like. I also think Leap Frog Word Factory is a fun video to get kids thinking about making words from letters. Best of luck to you and that extra big family you homeschool.

Stefanie Brzezicki

says:

I have six children that I homeschool, and two with Down Syndrome. I tried phonics with the oldest one and it did not work until she was in her teens. The youngest, I used sight words, and he is an incredible reader. I would love to connect with Jennifer.

Jennifer @ Camp Homeschool

says:

Stefanie, why don’t you visit me at my FB page, Camp Homeschool. You can message me any questions or comments and I’ll be sure to get back to you.

Wendy Johnson

says:

I can’t find Camp Homeschool fbook page

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Wendy,
Here is the direct link to Jennifer’s Camp Homeschool Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/camphomeschool/

Danielle McCammon

says:

This article is encouraging. I hope to use the system with my not so great spellers.

Mattie Nelson

says:

Beautiful! Thank you for sharing!

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