138

How to Teach Homophones

It’s a common scenario; people everywhere do it—maybe even you or your child.

You’re writing a note and are about to write the word peak. But wait! Your pencil poises midair: is it sneak peak? Or is it sneak peek? Now consider stationary and stationery; they are both pronounced the same, but which one means writing paper?

These sets of words are called homophones (or sometimes homonyms), and they can cause a lot of trouble for spellers.

What Are Homophones?

Homophones are two or more words that sound alike but that are spelled differently and have different meanings.

Here are a few homophone pairs: deer and dear, billed and build, and sew, so, and sow.

Homophones occur in English because there are multiple ways to spell the same sound. For example:

  • The sound of /n/ can be spelled with the letter N or the letter combination KN, resulting in the homophones night and knight.
  • The sound of /ā/ can be spelled A-consonant-E or AY (among other possible spellings), giving us daze and days.
  • The schwa sound (the muffled /uh/ sound of vowels in unaccented syllables) causes words like complement and compliment to be pronounced alike.

How Are Homophones Different from Homographs and Homonyms?

Good question! Let’s look at homographs first.

Homographs are words that are spelled the same, but have different meanings and may have different pronunciations.

Examples of common homographs include:

  • does and does
    He does like to run. Does are female deer.
    (Same spelling, different pronunciation.)

  • wind and wind
    I can feel the wind in my hair. Wind up the string before it gets tangled.
    (Same spelling, different pronunciation.)

Homonyms are words that are pronounced the same and spelled the same, but have different meanings.

Here are some examples of homonyms:

  • bear and bear
    We saw a bear in the woods. The cold was more than he could bear.
    (Same spelling, same pronunciation.)

  • left and left
    They left the coin on the beach. Turn left when you get to the lemonade stand.
    (Same spelling, same pronunciation.)

You may have noticed that there is some overlap between the terms. For example, well and well can be categorized as both homographs AND homophones. And then there is added confusion because many people use the word homonyms when they are actually talking about homophones.

The easiest way to visualize the difference between these three terms is with a Venn diagram. Here’s a 30-second video that demonstrates the concepts.

Now that we’ve gotten the technical part out of the way, let’s see if we can help you and your children avoid homophone confusion!

List of Homophones

First, let’s start with a list. There are LOTS of homophones. In fact, the list below contains more homophone pairs than you can shake a stick at! In order to make this list as useful as possible, words that are archaic, slang, naughty, or extremely uncommon have not been included.

Download this BIG list of homophones!

Regional Accents Can Affect Whether Words Are Homophones

Some words are homophones in some areas but not in others. For example, in certain parts of America, weather and whether are pronounced the same, but in other regions the WH in whether has retained a distinct /hw/ sound. The words acts and ax sound alike to most of us, but some people pronounce the T in acts.

Speakers in the U.S. pronounce due and do identically, but in most British accents those words are pronounced differently. The words boy and buoy have the same pronunciation in England (and therefore are homophones), but not in America.

You can be the final judge as to whether certain word pairs are homophones in your neck of the woods.

My #1 Tip for Teaching Homophones

If your child struggles with spelling, concentrating on homophone pairs is one of the most confusing things you can do. Why is that? Think about it like this: imagine you met three new people this week.

Would it be easier to remember their names if you met them all at the same time? Or would their names be easier to remember if you met them at different times, under different circumstances? Most of us would agree that it would be easier to recall their names if the meetings were spaced out a bit.

Homophones are like that: meet them all at once and they get tangled up in your brain.

Trying to tackle a homophone pair like wait and weight in the same lesson can cause confusion where there shouldn’t be any. But this simple strategy can combat the confusion:

Teach the spelling of the words from the homophone pair one at a time.

In the case of wait and weight, teach wait first. In the All About Spelling program, we teach words containing AI long before we teach words containing EIGH – and we do so very deliberately. The vowel team AI is a much more common spelling of the long A sound than EIGH, so wait is taught sooner in the program.

After teaching the word wait, we reinforce the teaching in multiple ways until the word is mastered:

  • Wait is included in sentence dictation. The student spells the word wait in the context of dictated sentences.
  • Wait is included in the Word Banks. The student reads from the Word Banks frequently so he can get familiar with how the word looks.
  • Wait is on a Word Card, and that Word Card is reviewed frequently until it is mastered and retired.

And that leads us to my #1 tip for teaching homophones:

Let your student fully master the correct spelling and usage of wait before the homophone weight is introduced. By doing so, you greatly minimize the confusion and set your child up for success with homophones.

Teach Homophones in Context

Another great way to minimize homophone confusion is to provide context for the words. When teaching the word sore, for example, you might share this interesting folk remedy:

If you have a sore throat, try this: spit into the mouth of a frog and your sore throat will be cured!

Now there’s something to talk about:

  • Discuss the meaning of sore in this sentence.
  • Ask your child if he really thinks a sore throat could be cured this way.
  • Talk about other folk remedies.
  • Create a tongue twister using the word sore (Sally’s sore shin sure shines).

By the time the lesson is over, your child will be much more familiar with the meaning and spelling of this synonym for painful.

Of course, you can’t go into this much detail to teach every homophone, but even placing the word in a meaningful sentence goes a long way to provide clarity.

4 More Great Ideas for Teaching Homophones

Homophones can be confusing, but they can also be fun! There are lots of ways to make learning about homophones enjoyable, such as using games, tongue twisters, graphic organizers, storybooks, and more. Check out the resources below!

Free Homophone Riddles and Puns - download yours now

Pique your child’s interest in homophones by sharing these riddles and puns. For example:
Q: What is a quick look at a mountaintop? A: A peak peek.

(Download our free Homophone Riddles and Puns here!)


My List of Homophones - download your free PDF

When a spelling word has a homophone, point it out to your student and have him add it to his own personal homophones list.

(Download My List of Homophones here!)


Click to play with our fun homophone machine

Play with our free Homophone Machine! Type in any word, sentence, or paragraph and click the Convert button to see the homophones.

Try this one: “I would like to show you my new horse.” I think you’ll get a good chuckle!

And finally, here’s a shameless plug for my All About Spelling program…

Cover of Level 3 All About Spelling program

All About Spelling incorporates all the tips you’ve read about in this article.

Beginning in Level 3, the All About Spelling program teaches homophones in a way that prevents homophone confusion.

Which pairs of homophones cause your child the most difficulty? Post in the comments below!

< Previous Post  Next Post >

Leave a Comment

Rohit Kumar

says:

I read your post and thought you made some really great points

we appreciate this effort of making things easier for us to comprehend, thanks

Eve Margolis

says:

I’ve never been sure about when to teach homophone pairs. So much published curriculum has pairs taught in the same lesson. Teaching them separately makes so much more sense! I also love the easy way it is explained here.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Eve,
Thank you for letting us know that this blog post on homophones was helpful for you! We love being helpful.

Rosie

says:

Thank you for the helpful tips!

Alice Ross

says:

Most homophones give my oldest daughter trouble, so we started a journal where she draws pictures of the pairs (or trios) and then illustrates them. It helps her to draw them and then she makes such funny stories that she shares them with her grandmother and others and has that reinforcement too. We try to make at least one new page a week, and have more than 20 done. We have used your spelling curriculum from the beginning (now in book 5) and so appreciate your help with homophones (and everything else). I downloaded your big list!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Alice,
I love your idea to illustrate homophones! That would really help make them stick. Thank you for sharing this idea.

Zakaria Ibn Iddissh

says:

This topic about homophones is very interested.

Faye

says:

thank you for the information. I am sure I will use it. I tutor two adults in literacy. One is in her 70’s and on a 2nd grade reading level and the other one is 56 and on a 1st grade reading level. I am always looking for free resources to adapt to my students.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Faye,
How wonderful that you can help these adults in this way! Please let us know if you have any questions that would help you help them.

Jim

says:

Splendid! I’m an English-language instructor and very glad I’m on your website. You really making teaching easier.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jim,
We are pleased to hear that our website is helping to make your teaching easier!

Kate Hall

says:

I’m a little confused. I was looking through the All About Homophones book sample, which looks like a lot of fun, but it seems to contradict what this article is saying. The different homophones are paired together. Are there particular chapters after which I should pull out the Homophones book worksheets?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great question, Kate.

We recommend getting the All About Homophones book with All About Spelling level 3. By that time, students have learned quite a few words that have homophones, although it isn’t until AAS 3 that we introduce the concept of homophones. Once students have mastered one of the words, it is okay to then introduce the other word and work on a homophone sheet that has both.

Make sure your student has mastered at least one of the spellings, and then introduce that the word is a homophone and show how the other word is spelled. Often the other word is a less-frequently used word as well. For example, we use “be” much more often than “bee.” The All About Homophones book works on usage rather than spelling skills, so the emphasis is on making sure the student knows which meaning goes with each word.

It’s really a flexible resource book that you can use to suit your family’s needs. Some possibilities:

– Choose one homophone set a week to master
– Select worksheets and activities that correspond with your children’s spelling lessons
– When you notice your child make a homophone error, assign them the appropriate page to work on that homophone
– Some kids like to work through the book from beginning to end
– Have a Homophones Unit Study for a designated period of time while you take a short break from another language arts area or during the summer.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have further questions.

Becki

says:

Great info. My oldest is just starting AAS 3 and is really beginning to pay attention to homophones, homographs, and homonyms.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Becki,
You can capitalize on your child’s attention in these words and add them to the Homophone List as he finds them. You don’t have to wait until AAS introduces them.

Charissa

says:

This is really helpful! You have such detailed teaching advice. I would’ve thought I should teach them all together.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Charissa,
We’re happy to know this blog post was helpful to you. Please let us know if you have further questions or need anything.

Sherry

says:

This was so helpful! I am always so impressed by the level of information that you make available to us parents and educators–and for free!!! Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Sherry! We are so happy to be a source of information and help to parents and teachers.

Antiqué!

says:

Thank you for the fantastic tips. I’ve found them very useful. We don’t have a classroom where we can hang posters, but we like to shrink them and keep them for awhile in a “reference binder.” That way my students don’t have to wait to ask me about things, they can find the answer on their own. We’d love to see a homophones/homographs/homonyms poster with your nicely concise definition (which may be hard for my readers to read) and an example or two (which they could read) in your always visually pleasing style! Again, thank you for posting your helpful hints!

Jenny L

says:

Great refresher and tips for teaching!

Amy C

says:

We have just finished AAR3, and we also purchased your homophone book. When/how should I use it? I noticed lists in the homophone book by grade level, but do you have lists corresponding to AAR level? Thanks.

Amy C

says:

Sorry, I mean AAS not AAR (we just finished AAS3 ans AAR4)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
Our All About Homophones workbook doesn’t line up with the All About Spelling levels specifically. All About Spelling doesn’t introduce the concept of homophones until AAS 3, and after AAS 3 students would be ready to do most of the sheets from the Grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 sections, many from the Grade 5 section, and some from the Grades 6, 7, and 8 sections.

You can work through the book in order. Many families use a page or so per week. Make sure your student is very familiar with one of the spellings, and then introduce that the word is a homophone and show how the other word is spelled. Often the other word is a less frequently used word as well (for example, “be” is used much more often than “bee.”). The All About Homophone book focuses on usage rather than spelling skills, so the emphasis is on making sure the student knows which meaning goes with each word.

With my children, when I notice they have made a homophone error in their writing I make a note about it. Then the next time I need an easy spelling day (because of schedule conflicts or just because we have been working hard for a while and need a light day), I give them the page that works on the word they misused. It means they jump around the All About Homophone book, but it allows us to focus on what is most needful for them at that time.

It’s really a flexible resource book that you can use to suit your family’s needs. Some possibilities:

– Choose one homophone set a week to master
– Select worksheets and activities that correspond with your children’s spelling lessons
– Some kids like to work through the book from beginning to end
– Have a Homophones Unit Study for a designated period of time while you take a short break from another language arts area or during the summer.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have further questions.

AmyC

says:

Thank you. Before I noticed your reply I decided to do kind of what you called a unit study homophone unit between AAS3 and AAS4. Since we already covered about a dozen of them up until now, I just added in a few more so we can at least play some of the games listed in the book. Then we will move back into AAS4 and use the rest as we go like you suggested. Thanks again.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
I’m glad you found a way to make the book work for you!

Gina

says:

I have purchased and used the homophones workbook you provide and have had success in teaching my two children. We really enjoy your resources. Thank you

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Gina,
Thank you for letting us know you have had success with our All About Homophones workbook.

Katie

says:

This is so helpful!! My kids are just starting to discover homophones and it’s been pretty confusing for all of us, but these tips will definitely help. I’m excited to try All about Spelling this year!

Heather

says:

Great article!

Andrea

says:

Love this program! So easy to teach and my boys are finally understanding spelling.

Jenny Meyer

says:

I can not say enough good things about this program.
My kids love it. They have both learned so much.

Ashley Pittman

says:

Thank you! We need ways to make this fun.

Courtney Mayfield

says:

This is wonderful! The homophone list is so helpful.

Vanessa Sotelo

says:

Thank you, I found this post really helpful.

Carrie

says:

Thank you All About Learning for these posts…so helpful!!

Alexa

says:

Great tips!

Debbie B

says:

Is it possible to get the homo-phone, homo-graph, & homo-nym graphic (with the correlating pictures) in the video above, in a downloadable printable? This would be a great classroom reference tool!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Debbie,
That is a great idea. I will let you know if we can produce this printable.

Debbie B

says:

Thank you so much Robin!

Brandi

says:

I’m glad All About Spelling addresses this! We swtiched from another curriculum that only taught visual memorization and didn’t specifically explain homophones or homographs. I’m glad my daughters will be getting a thorough understanding from using this curriculum

Kim Weese

says:

I really like these helpful teaching tips.

Rebekah Griffith

says:

Good info!

Nicole D.

says:

Love these programs!!!

K Olson

says:

I love the way AAS teaches homophones. My boys are learning them with no problems or confusion.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for letting us know that All About Spelling is helping your boys to master homophones!

Kelly

says:

Wow! This blog post is extremely helpful. I will be utilizing all these great ideas and tools this upcoming year with my twin girls. Thank you!

Jean r

says:

Well, it helped me I am sure it will be very helpful for my daughter.

Michelle

says:

Thanks for the downloads. We will be working on homophones this year.

Carrie

says:

Thanks for the tips! Level 3 is on our school schedule for this year.

Robin

says:

We have not been over any of these yet!!!! Thank you for sharing!

Juill

says:

Thanks for the free downloads. We need it!

Anita F

says:

These are totally awesome teaching materials…

Kimberly

says:

Great tips! My kids have had the most trouble with too/to/two and there/their/they’re

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kimberly,
Your kids are in good company, as many adults have trouble with these homophone triplets too!

For too/to/two, start by building the word twins with tiles (or writing it largely on a whiteboard or paper). Ask, “How many babies do you have when you have twins?”. “Two, of course!” Build or write the word two. You hear the /w/ in twins, but it is silent in two. However, whenever you mean two things (hold up 2 fingers as you say this), you must have that W in the word. Depending on how well your kids read and spell, you could show them twelve, twenty, and twice as well. You can tell them that back in the history of English we used to pronounce the W in two, saying it as /t/-/w/-/oo/. Over the centuries our pronunciation shifted but the spelling remained.

After a while of using two correctly (and not worrying about too and to), then build too with tiles or write it. Point out that too has too many Os. This too means excessively, or more than needed, as in too many, too big, too full. They can remember to use this too by thinking about it’s too many Os. Kids usually get this idea pretty well but struggle with the second meaning. Too also means also, as in, “May I go too?” Again, point out the extra O. When you want to add an extra thing (like, “He packed the red shirt too.”), you need to use the too with an extra O.

The other to is used in all other situations, and it is by far the hardest to define. It is used with verbs to form infinitives (to swim) and it is also a preposition showing direction (to the store). It can even be an adverb such as “came to” or “turned to” and other groupings with verbs. However, if your student has mastered two and too, they know to use to everywhere else.

For there/their/they’re, proceed the same one, teaching one and then waiting until your student is using that one correctly before teaching the next. They’re is often an easier one to master, as it is a contraction. They’re can only be used if the separate words they are would also work in its place. When a sentence needs a there/their/they’re, try seeing if “they are” would work in place of the there/their/they’re. If it does, then you know to use they’re.

Their shows possession, something that belongs to them. An easy test is to see if a singular possessive pronoun could be used in its place, such as his or my. If I want to write, “Their car rolled over.” I could substitute my for their and see that it still makes sense, so their is the right one to use.

Lastly, there, like to, is used in all other situations. There shows location (you can see the word “here” within it), but sometimes its use to show location is pretty abstract. We say, “You made me laugh there.” and while we might be referring to a real place, most likely we are referring to a place in a conversation. There can also function as a pronoun, such as “There is going to be nachos.” It has a few other uses too, but the thing to know is that they’re and their don’t fit, there is the one to use.

I hope this helps.

Alissa Horton

says:

You all offer so many great and helpful teaching pieces! Thank you!

Melissa

says:

Great idea to teach them separately! We JUST worked on homophones based on our tutors recommendation and it did not go well! I’m with you guys, this makes so much more sense to separate them for my daughter. (PS- we just fired the tutor so we can focus on just using AAR! It has worked so well for us already, why mess with what works? ;)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melissa,
I’m sorry to hear your daughter was confused by working on homophone pairs together.

Are you doing All About Spelling? It does an excellent job of working on homophones one at a time and then, after both are taught, making sure the student understands when to use one versus the other.

Donna Herring

says:

Thanks for clarifying! I love having a list to download for convenience.

Laura

says:

It makes sense to not teach homophone pairs together!

Bilqees Bano

says:

really helpful

Andrea

says:

These are so helpful! Thank you!

Melissa

says:

The homophone riddles and puns are fun!

Laura

says:

Very helpful list!

Abbey

says:

These are very useful tips for my young sons, who are educated at home. Have you had experience working with older students who confuse homophones? I also teach college-level writing at the local university, and some are really struggling to keep homophones straight, more so than before. My guess is that they are writing less in high school than we did, so they have fewer opportunities to put these lessons into action and to build solid language foundations. We do not, unfortunately, have class time to spend on these issues, as so many other areas are problematic as well (subject/verb agreement, independent vs. dependent clauses, punctuation, paragraph structure, thesis development, using evidence, conducting research, etc.).

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Abbey,
I’d encourage the students to make a personal homophone dictionary and proof-read all of their papers for the words they typically miss. Emphasize that spell-check doesn’t know the difference between homophones, so they can’t rely on that! When applicable, they should list the most commonly used form of the word first, and tell them to focus on learning that one. (For example, which/witch – 90% of the time, the one they want is which). You could consider making it worth some extra credit if the student turns in a list of a certain length. Purdue OWL has an example of what a personal dictionary might look like.

Abbey

says:

Thank you for the idea to have them focus on the most commonly used word of each pairings. I think that will help, particularly with the students who have learning disabilities.

Laura

says:

Thank you for the free lists- very helpful!

Shea

says:

This information is so helpful! I appreciate this blog–it’s transforming our homeschool!

Angelina

says:

what a fantastic resource!

Aida Pence

says:

This is very helpful

Ginger

says:

The homophone list is great.

Ginger

says:

The homophone list is great.

Liz

says:

The homophone riddles will be a hit with my child!

Renae B.

says:

Thank you for clear, concise information. I did not remember learning about the terms homonyms and homographs let alone the differences. Thank you.

Marlies

says:

Wow, looking forward to trying some of these great ideas.

Cassie

says:

Thanks so much for this blog and your great customer service!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Awww, you are welcome, Cassie!

Roslyn Harris

says:

We just came across homophones in reading today. We are just reading a fun book now (Cowboy sam) and the word two was used. He knew about to but this was different. I told him what the word said and what it meant and that yes it was pronounced like to and some words sound the sam6and mean different things. Then later in the reading he read to. Now he has been introduced to homophones:) He is going to start AAR 2 soon so we aren’t very far along yet but he is starting to take off reading!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Roslyn,
Just wait until he comes across the word too!

Homophones tend to be interesting and fun in reading, but they can become a bother in spelling. This was a sweet introduction to homophones and a great way to begin!

Mary Fripp

says:

This something that so many students struggle with. I really appreciate all of the visuals on your site. Thank you for such a wonderful resource!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Mary.

I aim for my children to be able to catch homophone mistakes when they check their writing, as I am pretty sure homophone mistakes will happen. I caught myself in a hear/here mistake earlier today!

Jenn A

says:

Wow – thanks for all the awesome ideas!

Amanda

says:

My kids will love the homophone riddles and puns! Thank you.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Amanda. I’m a fan of homophone puns too, much to my kids’ eye rolling!

Jaime B

says:

How did I not know about the homophone machine?! My daughter will LOVE this! We started AAS level 3 this spring and have the homophones book we need to start soon.

Selina Luppino

says:

This resource would be very helpful :-)

Deanna Frizzelle

says:

These are amazing resources! Thanks for making them available! : )

Marlene

says:

Love how AAS/AAR covers things that some curriculums glaze over…homophones are tough but lots of FUN!!! The homophone machine is great try it out for some giggles.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Marlene,
The Homophone Machine is definitely a lot of fun and giggles! It also helps children to be more inclined to look for possible homophone mistakes in their own writing.

Nina West

says:

Great explanation of this tricky concept!

Patricia

says:

Great article! These have been tricky for my little one to learn.

Jessica manley Crowley

says:

Thanks for the helpful info! I look forward to teaching my kids about homophones this year.

Quasha

says:

Thank you. This was a very informative article. I’ve always had a natural gift with spelling and never had any formal teaching about the info above, it just came easily. But this is some good stuff!

Kathy R.

says:

A very insightful article – thank you!

Kathy R.

says:

Oh – and I just looked at the “Big List of Homophones” – WOW!! Big list, indeed!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kathy,
The list is actually a bit misleading in its “bigness”. In order to make it as easy as possible to use, we list homophone pairs and triplets multiple times. For example, you will find the cell/sell pair alphabetized under C for cell and you will find sell/cell alphabetized under S for sell. This makes the list quite a bit longer, but it allows people to look up pairs or triplets by whichever of the words that comes to mind.

Emily D.

says:

I am hoping to use this for my kids.

Charis Henson

says:

Son and Sun, dear and deer, just to name a few. My oldest is only second grade this year- so this is a very helpful blog for me a study I think about how to approach teaching these things. I would have thought it interesting to tell her all the different spellings and meanings and then would have confused her. Now that I have read this, it seams obvious that was a foolish idea- but I’m still learning how to think these things through! Thank you!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Charis,
You are welcome. It isn’t necessarily foolish; many curricula think to teach homophones altogether. It works for many children, but for many others it does cause confusion and difficulties.

Tanya

says:

Teaching one word of a homophone at a time makes sense to me for my struggling reader speller. My clever witty one though loves lists ofvhomophones😉

Sherry

says:

Thanks for this great explanation! We will definitely use this download! I am so grateful for your website. You have made teaching reading and spelling so much easier!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Sherry. We are happy to help make your teacher easier!

Dawn Reitz

says:

My kids love learning about homophones. They are constantly trying to think of homophones all the time.

Racheal

says:

AAR and AAS look like great curriculum! I’d love to try them out!

Kairuh

says:

Love these ideas they will come in so handy this year. We love AAR and AAS they have made such a difference!!!

Deirdre

says:

Great ideas in this article. AAS has helped my older two learn these easily!

Danielle Hull

says:

Oh, I am such a word geek! I remember having a “pair” tree in 2nd grade where we had all the homophones. Of course, they were homonyms then :)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Danielle,
I think a pair tree to put homophones on would be a lot of fun!

Angela

says:

These always tripped me up as a kid, love these tips and love AAR and AAS.

Karen

says:

Can’t wait to start AAS this Fall! Thanks for the great tips!

Ashley

says:

Awesome tips! I always found homophones super fun!

Lynda

says:

I very much appreciate the fact that you take the time to explain the reasoning behind your reading and spelling approach. I do not feel particularly confident teaching language arts, but your programs and supplemental articles like this simplify the process.

Heidi

says:

I love your comparison to meeting three people with similar names all at the same time vs. separate circumstances, very helpful!

Crystal

says:

This is great advice! I have never seen them taught separately before, but it makes so much more sense that way. I know many adults still struggle with them!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Crystal,
Yes! I tell my kids if they get there/their/they’re and its/it’s down well that they will be doing better than many adults.

K Taylor

says:

Thank you for tips on teaching different aspects of reading and spelling. My third child has really struggled in areas that older siblings did not. Having this extra help for him is so valuable!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome. Please let us know if you have specific questions or concerns about your child’s reading and spelling.

Sonali

says:

Hi
Awsome work

Takia Sanders

says:

Looking forward to using All About Reading this coming school year!!

Jess

says:

Thank you for such a great program!

Heather

says:

I look forward to using All About Spelling in the future with our daughter!

Heather P

says:

This will be very helpful this year. Thank you!

Heidi Canna

says:

This was so helpful! THANK You!

Sparkle

says:

Thank you for this great tool to add to our homeschool box

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome! We hope you have fun with homophones, homonyms, and homographs!

Alison

says:

Helpful! Thanks!

Michelle

says:

Great article! Thank you!

David R

says:

Very nice clear explanation. Thanks!

Rabee

says:

Thank you, came at the right time

Michele

says:

I like the suggestion to teach the homophones separately, with many days/lessons between each one. That will really help the kids to understand better.

Carol

says:

You never cease to amaze me!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Aw, thanks, Carol! :)

Joyce Naylor

says:

Well written

Leave a comment