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When Two Vowels Go Walking

When Two Vowels Go Walking - All About Spelling

Catchy rhymes can be a fun and easy way to remember some of those pesky phonics rules. Have you heard this one?

When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking.

It’s a cute rhyme that’s easily remembered, and most teachers simply take it for granted that it is true, especially if their phonics program includes the rule as fact. The PBS children’s program Between the Lions even devoted an entire song to the “two vowels go walking” rule.

The video illustrates the concept with a catchy tune and animated letters that walk together (hand in hand, no less!) on a road. But their conversation is one-sided, since the first vowel is the only one that is allowed to “do the talking.”

For the sake of convenience, it would be wonderful if this rule were true—and teaching reading would be much simpler if it were.

But this “rule” is false 60% of the time.

To test the rule, I took the 1,000 most common words and analyzed them by applying the rule to each one. I discovered that, contrary to the rule’s claim, only 43% of the words actually followed the rule, and a stunning 57% of the words did not! When I analyzed the top 2,000 words, the percentage shifted even further—only 36% of the words followed the rule, and 64% did not. So much for this oft-repeated phrase!

When Two Vowels Go Walking - All About Learning Press

This is not to say that the rule is entirely invalid. There are many cases in which two vowels regularly “go walking,” including ai, au, ea, ee, ei, ie, oa, eo, oi, oo, ou, and ui. And often the first vowel is the one that “does the talking,” as represented in words like green, sea, hair, coat, clean, rain, and peach.

But these same pairs of vowels also exist in many words that don’t follow the rule, including good, about, earth, bear, noise, author, and friend.

Instead of relying on the incorrect guidance of this (fake) rule, teach your students the sounds of the letter combinations (called phonograms). Your student will learn important and fundamental concepts, such as ai says /ā/, au says /aw/, oa says /ō/, and oi says /oy/. This knowledge will give your students some real tools to work with—and there will be nothing to unlearn later!

Were you ever taught that “when two vowels go walking, the first does the talking?”

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Ten years ago in UK, the myth was alive and well. However, since phonics teaching is now much more likely to be taught in schools has enjoyed a big resurgence, it is finally being laid to rest :)

Melissa C

says:

Thank you for this insightful post! My daughter loves to learn rules for how things work but becomes frustrated in cases like these where there are so many exceptions. That is why we are switching to “All About Spelling” in her curriculum this year!

Melissa,
I’m glad you found this post so insightful. I find it very comforting to know, that with All About Reading and All About Spelling, I don’t have to worry about rules that have so many exceptions. In fact, All About Spelling goes so far to tell you about the exceptions to rules in a gray “teaching tips” box right within the lesson. For an example, check out Step 18 in this Level 1 sample. http://downloads.allaboutlearningpress.com/samples/AllAboutSpelling_Level1_Sample.pdf

Anyway, thank you for posting. I hope you have a lovely week.

Tammy W.

says:

So interesting! As a kid, I always wondered what the point was of learning so many spelling “rules” when there were always exceptions! Drove me bonkers! ;) I have purchased All About Spelling Level 1 to start using in the fall, but we might just start early–my 6-year-old son and I are so excited about it!

I have started him reading with a much more bare-bones program called TATRAS that similarly uses the vertical phonics approach, and he took off reading early in the school year. I am completely sold on that phonics method but definitely realize the benefits of your more organized and thorough curriculum.

I know your materials aren’t “graded,” per sae, but are there recommended no-younger-than developmental ages for each level? According to your placement tests, he’d be ready for AAR Level 3 and already knows many of the phonemes for that level.

However, I’m concerned that it might be beyond him developmentally to deal with antonyms, homonyms, etc., and I don’t want to frustrate him and ruining a very good thing–the fact that he absolutely loves to read! He can read beginner chapter books such as “The Magic Treehouse,” and seems to comprehend everything. His favorite thing to do is to sit around reading–this bibliophile (& former English teacher) mama’s dream-come-true!

Thanks!

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Tammy,

Actually, we have had some young students go through the reading program occasionally, so if he passed the level 3 placement test, he’ll probably do fine. As a double check, you can have him read a sample story from near the end of Level 2 to make sure he’s reading fluently: http://allaboutlearningpress.com/content/samples/AAR-L2-QueenBee-2ndEd-Sample.pdf

Don’t let the long terms scare you off–concepts like antonyms are fun and not too hard to understand (antonyms are opposites, for example). He doesn’t have to master the terms or remember them for all time, and the program will show him what they are. He’ll come across things like this again in language arts curriculum as he grows. Mainly these help him to play with language and have fun with the concepts.

And, if he knows some of the phonograms for a lesson, you can let him try out some of the longer, more challenging words for fun (these are optional for younger students but are a way for students to expand their knowledge–words like examination and contraption, armadillo and chimpanzee can be fun for kids who are ready for a bit more challenge at this level.) Enjoy!

Carol

says:

I am guilty of doing this too! Thanks for the article!

Taisa

says:

Thanks for this! I have taught my son this rule, but it’s true- there are so many exceptions- thanks for making this clearer for us!

Tammy

says:

Until I began using All Anout Soelling with my son I thought this was true! I am learning along with him! :)

Merry at AALP

says:

I love homeschooling and learning things alongside my kids!

Stefanie

says:

Yes I was. And I believe that rule is in one of the leap frog talking word factory videos. lol

Clara

says:

With a language as inconsistent as English, I’m glad we have something like All About Spelling to help our kids piece it together!

Alicia

says:

Great resource… Thank you

Cindy

says:

I don’t remember ever being taught this one, but it’s great to know your program explains all the rules. I’m not sure how many I actually know to teach my daughter properly!

Bethany

says:

I think I was taught this rule as a child. In fact, the only memories of reading and spelling learning I have are catchy “rules”

Jessica B.

says:

I learned this from a popular kids’ video. I wonder what else I picked up that I taught my children incorrectly before starting AAR!

Brandy Baker

says:

I learned this in school as a child, and I’m so glad there’s a terrific program like All About Spelling out there to help dispel these catchy spelling “myths”! We are loving AAS in our house!

Kristy

says:

I’m happy I read this before teaching my son this catchy phrase! Thank you!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Kristy! Glad we could help!

Michelle

says:

This worked great for my kids until the exceptions started appearing. I have a couple that are really stressed about breaking the “rule.” I wish I’d never taught it.

Erica K

says:

I found myself having to answer my daughter about all the words that seemed to be rule breakers because of this popular rhyme when they actually follow the phonograms If is so easy to get distracted by what is taught in public schools. Thank you for reminding me that our AAS/AAR curriculum is all she needs to learn these rules successfully.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Erica, I’m glad that this post was able to clear up the confusion for you and your daughter!

Jennifer D

says:

Thanks for this post! I was taught this line in school and always found it faulty.

Michelle C

says:

Thanks for this post! I remember these funny ways to teach the rules and this was actually one that was on our list to review in the next few weeks.

Robin

says:

I didn’t learn to read with phonics rules (I learned sight reading with Dick, Jane and Sally), but have taught reading with phonics rules. I so appreciated learning why the words I read sound the way they do. If phonics rules are taught in a whole system of phonics rules (I like ABEKA myself), words that don’t follow the “2 vowels walking” rule are covered in the other rules taught. I am so thankful for systems that teach phonics! The 2 vowel walking rule does have value in my eyes.

Jen

says:

I understand your concern with the song not working for all vowel pairs but after teaching first grade for many years, I think it is helpful. The English language is complex and there are many sound spelling for a single sound and specific sounds that those letter combos must be learned through practice. Of the most common words used in this study a good bit were probably sight words, which do not follow the rules for sure. That’s why they are called sight words. They should be learned by sight because most cannot phonetically be sounded out and knowing them increases fluency and comprehension. A good phonics program should teach all diagraphs, sight words, and sound spellings. I have seen if over time you are teaching and PRACTICING these reading skills with students they will benefit and learn to read. I’ve been using these same strategies with all ages of kids and, unless there is a learning problem, the student will learn to read and improve their reading!

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Jen,

Thanks for your comment! I agree that there are many ways to spell a single sound and that these must be learned with practice. (There are more than 250 ways to spell the 45 English sounds.) It sounds like you have done a great job teaching your students!

With regard to the words studied, actually 97% of English words follow regular patterns and are not true sight words (like “said,” where the “ai” doesn’t say it’s normal sound). Our program organizes words according to these phonogram patterns so that children can master them. There certainly is a visual component, but the letters are not completely arbitrary–there are definite patterns that, when learned, can make spelling easier for people. We find that good spellers tend to use 4 main strategies: phonetic, rules-based, visual, and morphemic: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/effective-spelling-strategies

Leilani

says:

This was very useful information. We were just working on this and other YouTube and Internet Apps teach this song. We will be talking about this during school time today.

Sarah M

says:

I had heard this rhyme but never incorporated it after I tested it on some common words.

Lizze

says:

I was just starting to talk to my son about this rule! Glad I will get that fixed before we get too far along!

V

says:

I am sure I taught my daughter this rule. Luckily she caught on anyway. My son is learning the AAL way.

Jessica

says:

Thanks for the tip. I found this article very helpful.

David

says:

It’s great to point this out. Are there other “rules” that should be avoided?

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi David,

That’s probably the worst one. The “i before e except after c” poem as originally worded has quite a few exceptions too, and many educators will point to that rule and say that English rules really aren’t reliable. We reword it so that it’s much more reliable. We fine-tune some other rules (such as when to change Y for adding suffixes) to make them a bit clearer as well. And, although not exactly a rule, many programs cite that our language has no reliable rules and is full of “sight words,” but there are really very few true “sight words” that don’t follow recognizable patterns. Even on the “Dolch Sight Words” list, 90% of the words are actually decodable! Check out this video: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/dolch-sight-words/

Alicia Langstraat

says:

I’m torn–at least this “rule” would help with ~40% of vowel combinations?! If that would group several vowel combinations, that would be a few less individual phonograms my kids would have to memorize separately, yes? Maybe adjust the saying somehow so it reflects that not all vowel teams go walking the same way?!

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Alicia,

Good Question! The problem is that many of the phonograms don’t just follow this “rule.” For example, while the phonogram ea does say long E in words like bead, it also says short e in words like bread, and long a in words like steak. IE can say long I in pie, but also long E in piece. EI can say long E in receive, but long A in veil. So, the student still ends up needing to learn each of the individual phonograms.

One additional problem that we often hear about is that kids who were taught this as a rule and then realize it’s not reliable come to view all “rules” as unreliable and think of our language as random. It can seem pointless, to a child who struggles, to try to learn because it’s not dependable.

I hope this helps!

Janice

says:

This jingle was in an earlier language arts program we used. I knew that it wasn’t all the time, but I did figure most if the curriculum taught it. Thank you for correcting.

Allison Haugan

says:

Thank you for researching this. I would have never guessed that the saying didn’t work over half the time. I have said it to my kids a few times but didn’t really work hard and ingrain it in their heads.

Fleur

says:

Such great helpful information

Renee S.

says:

I do remember that from school when I was young. I hated English/grammer and never really paid attention, unless my mom was teaching me something at home…huh, never really connected that to my own journey to schooling my children until now. :) The other “rule” which never made any sense to me was “i after e except after c.” Especially since my last name had an “ie” and my friend had and “ei,” neither of us had a “c” in our last name, yet they both made the same long e sound.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Renee, thanks for bringing up the “i before e” rule. The wording of the traditional poem just doesn’t work, as you noticed as a child! In All About Spelling, we teach a different version of the poem that does work. I’ll put together a future blog post to show you!

melisa

says:

Yes, I was taught this way, and I love that you have exposed the fallacy. I feel confident teaching my kids with your research-based curriculum.

Tracy

says:

I’ve often heard (and have since used) that catchy rhyme with my kids after all of the children’s programs that promote it. I thought it was genius…but I realize as we’ve been working through AAS with my second grader that there are more and better rules to follow and phonograms to guide us! Ironically just tonight as I was tucking my son into bed he said, “Mom, the word ‘heaven’ must be a rule breaker because the ‘e’ says /eh/ instead of ‘e’ :D Thanks for getting us on the right track! (AAR 1 with my Kinder son, AAS 2 with my 2nd grader)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Sweet example, Tracy! Your son is right–according to the “when two vowels go walking” jingle, ‘heaven’ is a rule breaker. According to the phonograms he is learning, ‘ea’ is saying its second sound, short e and therefore isn’t a rule breaker. He may not have gotten to that phonogram yet, but you could teach him to him early since he has the interest in words!

Instead of working with phonograms (phonics) you could approach spelling via the sounds themselves. Truespel phonetics has one spelling per each of the 40 sounds for US English. When you can say each one you can say any word in US English and you can spell it phonetically in truespel phonetics which is based on phonics (most prevalent phonograms) so it looks a lot like regular spelling. See http://justpaste.it/truescience .

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Tom,
Truespel can be learned quickly, but the resulting words are spelled in a untypical fashion. According to an example on your website, “That quick beige fox jumped” would be spelled “That kwik baezh faaks jumpd.” Off the top of my head, here are a few difficulties of a nontraditional system such as this:
– the wide range of English dialects would cause different spellings in different regions.
– closely related words such as ‘know’ and ‘knowledge’ would no longer look similar, abandoning the morphology of English, which is very helpful to higher level learning such as in the medical or legal field
– classic literature would be difficult (if not impossible) to read
– there is a social stigma connected to nonstandard spelling.
I believe that if you would have posted your comment in truespel, most readers would have scrolled past your comment.

I must have learned this rule when I was learning to read and it seemed to work until I started teaching my son to read and realized that 60% exceptions don’t work for my right brainer. Now I can teach him each sound in a multisensory way. I just love AAR.

Tammy

says:

Reading this blog has relieved me of a lifetime of spelling frustration.
I did well in school only because I tried to memorize everything. That only lasts so long and then there is always a new word to stumble across. I cant wait to use your spelling program with my child. Thank you for caring about us moms who want our children to know the truth.

Merry at AALP

says:

I’m so glad it was helpful, Tammy!

Katherine

says:

Thanks for sharing this! My kids voice this so-called rule they learned from Leap Frog and I always remind them that it isn’t true.

Brenda F.

says:

I use the vowels go walking rhyme often.

Emily Woodall

says:

Doh! I use this silly little rhyme with my dyslexic eight-year-old sometimes when she is struggling to sound out a word where this “rule” applies. I kind of feel like a heel now. She already struggles so much with reading. I hate to think that I have taught her something that she will have to unlearn. We are slowly working through AAR level 1 right now. We are almost to the end. She is having a tough time with “nk” and “ng” for some reason. I am thankful to have found AAR. We will continue to steadily work through at her pace. She is such a bright, creative little soul. It is tough to watch her struggle with reading and writing. Thanks for creating a curriculum and a supportive spot for those of us teaching dyslexic kids.

Merry at AALP

says:

I’m glad AAR is working for her! “NK” and “ng” are difficult for some kids. Hang in there, she’ll get it. If you want us to brainstorm ideas to help, send an email to me at support@allaboutlearningpress.com and tell me more about the struggle she’s having–I’d be glad to help!

Donna Perdue

says:

Thank you so much for the information. I taught first and second grade years ago and noticed the discrepancy in the phonics rule. Now, I can teach more effectively with my children.

Debbie

says:

Thank you!

Debra H.

says:

I was taught this rule as fact when I was a kid and have also taught it to my older two children. Fortunately for the younger two, we have begun using All About Spelling. I won’t make that mistake with them. :)

Katherine Kastner

says:

I want to hear more about what you have to say on this topic of “When two vowels go walking.”

Arlene Jinata

says:

I remember when I first saw and heard this catchy tune. I thought it was such a great way to teach the sounds of vowel combinations, especially since many kids learn concepts through songs. I didn’t follow through on using this song to teach and I’m glad that I didn’t!

Ruth Ann

says:

Yes, I have heard that on Sesame Street. Thank you for this informative blog post. I did not know those statistics about this rule. Learn something new every day!

Melissa

says:

I don’t ever remember learning little rules or songs like that, but as I’ve started to teach my son and have seen them I found myself buying in at first thinking it was a great way to teach and reinforce, then pulling back as I realized there seemed to be more exceptions to the rule.

Wow! I had no idea! My oldest child loved Starfall when she was learning to read, and still does now that she is a proficient reader. She’s been nagging me to let her show her 4 year old sister the website. Starfall was my first introduction to that rhyme, and I must say that I default to saying it when I can’t remember the phonogram myself. I guess I’ll keep that one out of my tool box from now on!
I love how I’m learning and re-learning all kinds of things while homeschooling my children! I have no idea which method was used when I was taught to read and spell 30 years ago, and this is all new to me.

http://www.learningmama.com

Tricia

says:

Thanks for all your wisdom! Loving the All About Reading program for my dyslexic son!

Love this blog post! Thanks for doing the work!

Katherine

says:

Thanks for the accurate rules! Love them.

Vanessa

says:

Thanks for the info!!!

Joni

says:

I don’t remember learning rules for spelling in school. Using your program with my children has taught me a thing or two!

Tanja

says:

I love coming to this site. Such good and valuable information to be found here. Thank you

Aw, thanks, Tanja! You made me smile. :)

Jeanne

says:

Great article!

Colleen

says:

I can remember being confused by this concept as a child, and wondered how to teach long vowels to my own kids. Thank you, Marie, for clearing up another childhood mystery. Your products are awesome!

I’m glad I could clear up that childhood mystery, Colleen! It was fun to hear from you. Thanks!

tara little bear

says:

No wonder my daughter has had such a hard time knowing how to spell! Thank you for this information. Every little bit helps!

Rebekah M

says:

I was never taught that ryhme. I was taught the phonograms and then practiced words.

I have used this ryhme with my children, but have stopped after reading with them and realizing how many words don’t follow the supposed rule.

Hi Rebekah,
You were fortunate to have learned the phonograms as a child. I haven’t met many adults who have had that advantage. Your children will benefit from your background!

diana

says:

WOW! I had never learned the two vowel saying as a child, but when my son was in Kindergarten he learned that riddle. I just repeated it to my daughter last week while she was trying to sound out a spelling word. I’m glad to know now the truth. Thanks for putting the time into your curriculum to offer such a great product!

Jodi

says:

Marie, I have personally improved my poor spelling skills just by teaching my kids using your books. It by far is the most detailed spelling program I’ve seen or used to date.

Thanks for your kind words, Jodi! I’m happy to hear that your spelling has improved as you teach your children! That is a great side effect! :)

Janice

says:

Yes, I was taught this rule as a child. I taught it to my son as well, with the understanding that there are some rule-breakers. I just didn’t realize that the “rule” is broken more often than not! We worked on the phonograms A LOT though, so he hasn’t had any trouble. I’ll definitely be careful how I present this to my other two younger children though. Thanks!

Candy Delao

says:

Thank you for all your research and time you have put into this. I do remember hearing this ‘rule’, and I’m glad to know the truth about it. I love your material!

Peg

says:

I see this case with many of the phonics rules. We need to be careful about what we’re teaching students to rely on. Thanks for sharing, and reminding me!

Mary

says:

Thank you for this post. I have realized this to be true which is why I enjoy teaching All About Spelling to my kids. I relied on my previous schooling to help my children and realized that I had to unlearn a lot of things. As I tried to teach my kids this rule it did not apply so I didn’t enforce it and when I came upon your curriculum I was more confident in teaching it. I have learned so much as well. Thank you.

Hi Mary! I’m glad to hear that you are gaining confidence in teaching spelling through the All About Spelling program. It’s not easy when you have to unlearn something, but you’re doing it! Way to go!

Chandra

says:

Thanks so much for the tip!!

Michele Dunham

says:

Yes , I was taught this rule and did teach it to my kids, telling them there are exceptions. For my dyslexic daughter, that gets very confusing. I will definitely correct this and tell her this rule is the exception so let’s just memorize the phonograms. Thank you for the work and research you put into your program. After owning several well know programs on the market, yours is the only one that is actually teaching my children to be intuitive spellers.

Hi Michele,
I’m glad you came across this post so you can correct that with your daughter. As you can imagine, dyslexic kids are even more discouraged by untrue “rules” than typical learners, so I’m glad you have this opportunity. It will be good for your daughter to see that you are constantly learning as well!

Thank you for bringing this up. I see this “rule” in many classrooms across the country. But a rule that isn’t accurate more than half the time is actually a hindrance to a child.

Only an adult reader knows when to apply the “rule” at the right time–because s/he is using other information stored in memory to observe patterns in our language.

Hi Marnie,
That’s a great explanation of why adults are comforted by this rule. They can easily think of many words that follow this rule because of information stored in memory. Thanks for commenting!

Noelle

says:

oh bummer! We know that little tune too! The kids enjoy the Starfall website and it is one of their videos and I thought it was great…

Mary

says:

Thank you so much for expanding your awesome program with these blogs. My son actually said “I can read” the other day. First time and he’s 9.

Excellent news, Mary!!! Thanks so much for sharing your son’s success with us! Please let me know if you ever run into snags as you are teaching him to read (support@allaboutlearningpress.com). We want to keep that momentum going!

DMel

says:

Good day,
How do you propose we teach students to identify the different sounds produced by the same vowel combination eg oo in food vs good? I often give them a list of each and hope recognition over time through various activities does the trick.

Make a poster or pocket chart with two columns. One is headed with a picture of a moon; the other with a book.
Print the word moon and book under the pictures with oo in red.
Then list example words beneath. Remove the words. Mix them up. Have the student
once again place the words in the appropriate column. This works!

Great idea, Phyllis! Thanks for sharing!

Hi DMel,
I recommend that you teach all of the sounds of the phonograms (letter combinations). For example, for phonogram oo, you would teach the three sounds:
– /oo/ as in food
– /oo/ as in book
– /o/ as in floor
(The diacriticals don’t work in the comments. The first /oo/ should have a macron (straight line) over it, and the second /oo/ should have a breve (smile) over it.)

You can hear the three sounds here: http://apps.allaboutlearningpress.com/Release_Web-v1.0/sounds/oo.mp3

Here’s more information on the phonograms: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/phonograms
The downloadable version can be found here: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/phonogram-sounds-app/

We also use Word Banks, as you have described, to help students build their visual memory of the words.

Teodora

says:

I think there are plenty of exceptions and at the end of the day systematic visual memorization / exposure as well as some guidelines like the ones presented in all about spelling will lead to good spelling. Think about the way you pronounce and spell the words read, bead, head, said, paid.

Good examples, Teodora! Thanks for commenting!

Jocelyn

says:

This is so true! Thanks for giving us the tools to teach in a way that is so applicable!

Elaine Johnson

says:

I was taught that rule and my kids play an app on the iPad that repeats that rule! Never again! Fortunately they haven’t tried putting that rule to practice do they don’t quite understand it.

Stacey J

says:

I came across this rule when my oldest was learning to read; I had never heard it before but it’s catchy and seemed to fit so I did teach it. I’m glad you’re clearing this up for me now !

olivia

says:

I was, and never heard this until today, but thanks to you pointing this out, my children will be better off without this myth.

Chris

says:

Great article since this is often the first rule learned.

Carrie

says:

I had assumed that that rule was true pretty much all of the time. I’m glad to see that I shouldn’t ever use it because I don’t want my children to rely on something that only applies occasionally. Thanks!

Carol Adeney

says:

We find the rule very useful with our ESL students since in many German words the opposite is the case –
the second vowel does the talking. The rule helps reset the mind to an English way of pronouncing words.
Of course, we talk about the exceptions and go over them down the line, but 43% is an excellent statistic to begin with!!

That’s very interesting that many German words follow the opposite case! Thanks for sharing!

Joelle

says:

Interestingly, it seems to me with my kids that after introducing the English phonograms (at quite a young age) they never ever questioned why they should be different in German or French (mine have to learn all three). They just accepted that each language has its own set of phonograms.I thought they would find it confusing but kept quiet and never compared the languages (i makes the long ee sound in German for example). I never taught the rhymes, just the sounds. Nor did I use the set word alphabet for each beginning letter (very common in German).

Julie

says:

Wow! We have watched that between the lions video numerous times and have talked about that rule. I think my kids will be excited to hear this as they’ve recently been reading a myth buster book by national geographic and this will fit right in! Busted! Thanks so much for your work in these areas of reading, spelling and general learning!

I’m glad it was perfect timing for your kids! The myth buster book sounds neat. Have fun!

Karen

says:

Thank you so much for a scientific, data-based approach to looking at the spelling rules. What good is a rule is there are 64 exceptions for every 100 applications!

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