222

What Happens after All About Reading?

What Happens After All About Reading - from All About Learning Press

If your child has recently finished All About Reading, my first piece of advice to you is…celebrate! Have a piece of cake. Call Grandma and Grandpa. Take the rest of the day off and go to the park!

And of course, don’t forget to document this milestone and send us a photo! It makes my day when we hear from kids like Katie who complete our program! The accomplishment feels fantastic, doesn’t it?

Now your child has a rock-solid base upon which to grow in reading ability. First celebrate–then come back here for some ideas about what comes next.

But before we dig into specifics, let’s take a quick look at the big picture.

The Two Major Stages of Reading

There are two major stages of reading: “Learn to Read” and “Read to Learn.”

After your child has competed four levels of All About Reading, she’s officially done with the “Learn to Read” stage.

She now has the phonics and word attack skills necessary to sound out just about any familiar word. She can figure out words by dividing them into syllables, making analogies to other words, sounding out the word with the accent on different word parts, and recognizing suffixes and prefixes.

Now your child is ready for the next major reading stage: “Read to Learn.”

At this stage, reading is used to gain knowledge. Your child will grow in her ability to react to information and connect ideas. The possibilities for her to explore the world around her are limitless, and she can embark on this exploration through reference books, trade books, text books, magazines, and an endless array of literature. Ideally, this stage has no end; your child will “read to learn” for the rest of her school career—and beyond.

Download our Mastery Evaluation to be sure that your child has mastered the “learn to read” stage and is ready for the “read to learn” stage.

downloadable mastery evaluation

Recommendations for the “Read to Learn” Stage

The “Read to Learn” stage does not require formal instruction like the “Learn to Read” stage does. As your child moves away from learning to read, her knowledge and vocabulary should grow and her reading should become more automatic. But that doesn’t always happen entirely on its own. You will need to be proactive to ensure that your child continues to grow as a reader and as a learner.

Have your child read for 30 minutes every day.

Help your child choose reading material that is interesting to him, both fiction (such as great chapter books) and nonfiction (such as kid-friendly magazines). For more ideas, check out resources such as Honey for a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt and Books for Boys and Children Who Would Rather Make Forts All Day (from IEW’s free download page).

Work on building your child’s vocabulary.

For most kids, reading and being read to are the best ways to do this. But for some great practical tips, be sure to check out this comprehensive article about building your child’s vocabulary.

What About Literature?

A study of literature is an important component of the “Read to Learn” stage, but for many kids, studying literature can easily become a “drag.” Remember, your goal during the “Read to Learn” stage is to encourage reading and to help your child continue to develop fluency and confidence, so it’s important to let your child be drawn into the joy of reading.

How do you make a study of literature more interesting? Here are a few ideas.

  • Engage in discussions about things in the book that interest your child.
  • Have your child search for great descriptive writing that really pulls her into the story.
  • Discuss a character that your child empathizes with. How does she feel about a choice the character makes? Would she make the same choice that the character makes?
  • Is there a particularly interesting setting or theme in the story?
  • Discuss a character in the story that your child would like to know in real life.
  • Discuss how the story relates to an interesting period in history that you have studied with your child. How does understanding that history help you understand the story?

While encouraging your child to read independently is important, reading good literature aloud to your child is a great way to model your own thought processes. This will help your child learn to engage more effectively with what she’s reading, and will help her grow more confident in her own comprehension ability.

Whether your child reads alone or together with you, be sure that your discussions are light and natural. You’ll have a good feel for how well your child is understanding the reading as you talk with her about the book or story. Too much “analysis” can make a child dread reading, or worse, make her think she isn’t doing it “right.”

If you are looking for a more formal approach to teaching literature, here are a few literature guides our customers have found helpful.

Please Share Your Experience!

Has your child finished All About Reading Level 4? Share a photo on Facebook or Instagram, or email it to us at photos@allaboutlearningpress.com. We’d love to celebrate with you!

And if you have ideas for encouraging the “Read to Learn” stage, please share in the comments below.

Share This:

< Previous Post  Next Post >

Leave a Comment

Katy Shewmaker

says:

Thank you so much! My second grader finished your program and we love it! Can you please direct me toward a curriculum for grammar/ spelling/ punctuation? He loves to read and has great comprehension skills. I would like to work toward more writing. Thank you for any suggestions:)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Katy,
It’s great to hear that your child has done so well with All About Reading!

For spelling, we recommend All About Spelling. It compliments All About Reading and has a gradual progression for increasing the student’s stamina and fluency in writing, from words and short phrases in Level 1, to phrases and short sentences in Level 2, to 12 dictation sentences per step in Level 3. Partway through this level, the Writing Station is introduced. In this exercise, students write sentences of their own that they make up using some of their spelling words.

In this way, students have begun to use words in a more real-world context through dictation and writing, to help them transition to longer writing assignments. Dictation and the Writing Station both serve as an important bridge between spelling words in the context of lists (where the patterns are similar), and more “real world” writing. By the end of Level 3, students have mastered about 1000 words from the regular and reinforcement lists, and they have developed stamina and some beginning editing skills that will help them when writing their own compositions.

For Grammar: there are a number of grammar programs available that have either multi-sensory components or an incremental approach. Some of the programs focus exclusively on grammar, while some include writing as well.

Most of our customers wait until their students have a good start in spelling before adding a grammar program. However, some that are interested in adding grammar earlier have enjoyed First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind by Jessie Wise. (I waited with my kids, but did a casual introduction to nouns and verbs through things like SchoolHouse Rock videos.) Here are other suggestions:

– Winston Grammar is a hands-on program with color-coded cards, and is generally aimed at students in 4th to 7th grades.

– Easy Grammar features an incremental approach and includes topics such as usage and punctuation, for 2nd grade and up.

– Essentials in Writing is described by author Matthew Stephens as a Math-U-See approach to writing. In the elementary levels, this program incorporates grammar with writing. The lessons are presented in short video segments of 3 to 5 minutes and then the student works on the concept that was taught. This is a multisensory and incremental program that is very easy to use. There are levels for 1st-12th grades.

– The Sentence Family is a simple and fun program aimed at 3rd through 6th graders. The program uses drawing pictures along with a storyline to teach parts of speech and how they relate to each other. It is a very fun introduction to grammar but is not complete in itself.

– Fix It Grammar is incremental and uses very short lessons. Each level teaches grammar using sentences from a single story, so there is the added fun of seeing the story slowly unfold. The teacher’s manual is very comprehensive and even includes advanced concepts so the teacher can answer questions a curious student may have. The youngest the program is recommended for is 3rd grade, although it is appropriate for older students as well.

– Analytical Grammar teaches a mastery of grammar by working on it for short grammar focused units once a year for 2 to 3 years. Junior Analytical Grammar is for 4th or 5th graders, with Analytical Grammar for 6th to 9th graders.

I hope this helps, but please let me know if you need more information or have questions.

Karen Shaffer

says:

I have used AAR from Level I through Level III and intend to begin Level IV this fall with my 9 year old. I am truly astounded by the effectiveness of this program. My son struggled with reading but we stuck with it and by the end of Level II he gained the confidence he was lacking to really preserve with this skill. When we began Level III something clicked within him and he had cracked the code so to speak making reading an enjoyable experience. I trusted the process of this program and the bounty has been greater than words can express. I started the pre-k program with my youngest and he transitioned easily into Level I. We are nearly halfway through Level I now and I cannot believe I have a four year old who is reading! I am so thankful for this program and what it has offered my children. Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sounds wonderful, Karen! Thank you for sharing how well All About Reading has helped your children. Keep up the wonderful work!

Jess Sanna

says:

Thank you for the great ideas- and the great curriculum! My daughter is 11 and struggled with reading for years before we found AAR. Now, she’s almost done with Level 3, and excited to start Level 4. Looking forward to when she is finally “Reading to Learn”!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Wonderful, Jess! Congratulations on nearing the end of All About Reading! 😊

Kimberly Key

says:

This is so helpful! My child is only finishing up Level Three, but I want to be researching follow up options now so I have plants of time to make an informed decision. We love AAR and AAS!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kimberly,
It’s always good to think ahead and make informed plans!

Amy L.

says:

Thank you for this amazing program. I have two kids; they both had a rough start with reading and an intense dislike for it. We had tried so many different reading programs. After my daughter started Level 1 with “All About Reading”, it took a while, but eventually she started to really enjoy reading. The stories were interesting and often funny, which made a huge difference. She just completed Level 4 and she loves reading now. Midway, her brother decided to start on the program too. He too overcame his struggles with reading. He is now progressing just fine and will catch up to his younger sister soon. This program has been such blessing to our family. Thank you so much!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Oh, Amy, this is so wonderful! I love to hear how All About Reading helps children go from disliking reading to loving it. Keep on reading!

Dan

says:

Thank you for the AAR program. My daughter is two lessons from the end of level 4 We stated a couple months after her third birthday and she took to it right away. She will turn five in a few months and everyone is amazed at how well she reads. I’m always quick to give credit to AAR.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Wow, Dan, your daughter is doing so well! What a world of reading awaits her with such an early start. 😊

MommyofFour

says:

Do you have a list of books you recommend after Level 1, 2, 3, and 4? For Supplemental reasons, or would you just reread the stories of that book to reiterate the words?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yes, we do have a list titles for those that want more reading with each level. They aren’t necessary but can be fun to add.

We don’t know of another set of readers that will correlate exactly, so you may have to teach some new patterns or just help with some words that they’ll later.

Here are some possibilities for reinforcement during and after AAR 1:
– Bob books, Sets 1 & 2
– DK Flip the Page Rhyme and Read books: Pat the Cat, Jen the Hen, Mig the Pig, Tog the Dog, and Zug the Bug.
– Usborne Very First Readers or My First Library
– Sonlight’s Fun Tales (27 books in one box, using short vowel words), and I Can Read It Book 1 (the first part)
– Christian Liberty Press readers, (It Is Fun to Read, Pals and Pets)
– Half Pint Readers – Level a for the first part of AAR 1, Level b for the second part. Level C would go more with AAR 2.
American Language Series books. The first two titles, “Fun in the Sun” and “Scamp and Tramp”, go pretty well with AAR 1 and the second two titles, “Soft and White” and “At the Farm”, would go along with AAR 2., while the last two, “On the Trail” and “Sounds of the Sea”, go along with AAR 3.
– Books by Nora Gaydos (bright pictures with stories, these come in packs of 10–see the Level 1 sets)
– Dash into Reading (expensive, but see if you can find a coupon or if your library has them)
– I See Sam Readers (also available online for free)
– I Like to Read books: I see a Cat, See Me Dig, Big Cat, Happy Cat, I Will Try, Pig Has a Plan
– Cat Traps (Step-Into-Reading, Step 1)
Miss Rhonda Readers Set 1 (these do include some two-syllable words and unfamiliar phonograms occasionally)
Meg and Greg books (these books have text for the parent to read and then text for the student. They follow AAR 1 fairly well but do include two-syllable words like “rocket” that students won’t learn until level 2, so you would have to help your children with some words.)
Primary Phonics (sets 1 and 1A go pretty well with AAR 1)
Reading Teacher
– Fun Phonics–the first 3 books
Progressive Phonics – Free phonics books that can be read online or downloaded and used right away.
We Read Phonics Big pictures with one sentence. Example of level 1 is “Bugs on the Bus”. Example of level 2 is “Which Pet is Best”.
– We Both Read books. On the left-hand pages there is text for the parent to read and on the right is text for the kids to read. Here’s an example.
– Flyleaf Publishing Emergent Readers
– The Core Knowledge LA Kindergarten readers are usually decodable after AAR/AAS level 1. The readers start at unit 6. Unit 10 (the last Kindergarten unit) has some silent e words, which wouldn’t be accessible yet to students doing AAR. They’re free to download:
https://www.engageny.org/resource/kindergarten-skills-unit-6-reader-kit
https://www.engageny.org/resource/kindergarten-skills-unit-7-reader-seth
https://www.engageny.org/resource/kindergarten-skills-unit-8-reader-sam
https://www.engageny.org/resource/kindergarten-skills-unit-9-reader-zach-and-ann
– A Pig, A Fox, and a Box, and A Pig, A Fox and Stinky Socks. Funny, but do have a few words not taught in AAR 1. Some moms have found them accessible though.
– S.P.I.R.E. Decodable Readers. Level 1 uses short vowels and these phonograms: a, i, o, u, e, sh, ch, th, wh, -ng, -nk. You would want to introduce how to read the wh phonogram. Some of the Level 2 readers would work too, and then others would be better with AAR 2. Those include: ff, ll, ss, al, wa, qu, ck, tch, and vowel-consonant E words.

Here are some ideas for additional reading that others have used during and after AAR 2:

– High Noon Books Sound Out Chapter Books
– Christian Liberty Press has a set of 4 Phonics readers: It Is Fun To Read, Pals and Pets, A Time At Home, and It Is a Joy To Learn. Book 3 mainly uses concepts from AAR 2 (some 3)
– Sonlight 1 and 2 readers.
– Dr. Seuss books.
– Now I’m Reading.
– Bob Books (these start easy but the higher sets do use more advanced words. Older students may think they’re too childish, however.) Levels 3, 4, and 5 include concepts mainly from levels 2-3 of AAR.
– Flyleaf, Books to Remember Decodable Literature – some of these can work with AAR 2 and above.
– I See Sam readers (free online, or they can be purchased):
Set 1 has 73 regular words (can be sounded out after learning ch/sh/th in AAR 1), and 9 “sight” words. All 1 syllable words. Introduces both small and capital letters.
Series 2 introduces al, 80-150 words
Set 3 introduces contractions, er, ou, 100-150 words
Set 4 introduces ai, ar, ing, ed, 2 syllable words, 200-400 words
Set 5: ay, ch, ea, ee, ir, ol, oo, or, ow, qu, ur, 300-500 words
Set 6: au, aw, ew, igh, kn, oa, oi, oy, ph, tion, ture, ue, wr, 500-700 words
Set 7: prefixes, suffixes, semi colon, prolonged sounds, possessives, abbreviations, initials, 600-800 words per story
Set 8: suffixes, time, hyphenated words, abbreviations, 4-step approach to decoding multi-syllable words, 700-1000 words per story.

Miss Rhonda Readers Set 2
American Language Series books. The first two titles, “Fun in the Sun” and “Scamp and Tramp”, go pretty well with AAR 1 and the second two titles, “Soft and White” and “At the Farm”, would go along with AAR 2.
– Fun Phonics might also be a possibility–the last 3 books include concepts mainly from Level 2.
– From EPS Books (http://www.epsbooks.com):
Primary Phonics Story Books
S.P.I.R.E. Decodable Readers
The Alphabet Series

Progressive Phonics – Free phonics books that can be read online or downloaded and used right away. Follows AAR very closely.
– The McGuffey Readers were used for years from the mid-1800′s into the early 1900′s to teach reading. They are available online for free in the public domain.
We Both Read books – These books are designed for the parent to read one page of more difficult text and the child reads the other page of easier text.

Additional readers for during and after AAR 3:
– High Noon Books Sound Out Chapter Books
– The titles that start with Mr. Putter and Tabby. . .
Pick the Pears
Paint the Porch
Dance the Dance
Spin the Yarn
Stir the Soup (and many more)

– Christian Liberty Press has a set of 4 Phonics readers: It Is Fun To Read, Pals and Pets, A Time At Home, and It Is a Joy To Learn. Book 3 mainly uses concepts from AAR 2 and 3 and book 4 could be read after AAR 3, though it includes a few concepts from 4.
– Sonlight readers–their early cores have some wonderful choices such as the Frog and Toad books, Amelia Bedelia, Nate the Great, and other childhood favorites.
American Language Series books. The first two titles, “Fun in the Sun” and “Scamp and Tramp”, go pretty well with AAR 1 and the second two titles, “Soft and White” and “At the Farm”, would go along with AAR 2., while the last two, “On the Trail” and “Sounds of the Sea”, go along with AAR 3.
– My Father’s Dragon trilogy
– Magic Treehouse books
– Henry and Mudge series
– Now I’m Reading.
– Fly Leaf, A Book to Remember – Books 2 and 3 can be read after Level 3 of AAR.
– Fun Phonics might also be a possibility–the last 3 books include concepts from levels 2-3

After completing AAR 4, our recommendations are:

The article above, What Happens after All About Reading?, for lots of ideas on what to do next.

Read-read-read! Get your students hooked on an age-appropriate series. Subscribe to kid-friendly magazines, check out tons of books from the library, have them read instructions for games they want to play.

Set a daily reading time for your students to read for 30 minutes. Choose books that interest your student, both fiction and non-fiction. You can also choose books that correlate to other things you are studying, such as historical fiction or Usborne books that cover science topics. Possible sources:
– Literature-based curriculum such as Sonlight
– Resource books like Honey for a Child’s Heart
The 1000 Good Books List
Books for Boys and Other Children Who Would Rather Make Forts All Day
– Check out the Chapter Book Reviews on our Blog
– Complete the All About Spelling program, which supports reading.

I hope this helps! Please let us know if you have additional questions.

Kendra

says:

Thank you for these suggestions! My daughter has dyslexia and was really behind. This last school year she increased 3 grade levels in reading! We just started level 3 and as we were doing lesson she asked me what we do when we finish level 3. She is so proud of herself and has truly found a love of reading.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kendra,
This is so wonderful! What amazing progress your daughter has had. Keep up the excellent work, both of you.

Jennifer

says:

Can you suggest a good curriculum after All About Reading Level 4? I wish the reading went to higher levels.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jennifer,
After All About Reading 4, students don’t need to continue with reading instruction. They need to just read, read, read to build their reading skills further. So, if you want a good curriculum for after AAR 4, choose one that has students read interesting materials for about 30 minutes a day. Here are some curricula that are known for scheduling lots of great books: Sonlight, Bookshark, Ambleside, My Father’s World, Moving Beyond the Page, Beautiful Feet Books, Tapestry of Grace, The Well-Trained Mind, Robinson, Veritas Press, Truth Quest History, and Notgrass Company. I’m sure there are others too. Most of these choose most, but not all, of their scheduled books to match the history the student is studying. This works well with the “reading to learn” stage that students are ready for after AAR 4.

However, you can simply offer your child great books, magazines, and other reading materials without a curriculum as well.

I hope this helps some, but please let me know if you need further help or have more questions.

Mommyoffour

says:

Robin, thank you so much for your thoughtful response. After teaching my oldest at a young age how to read, his two younger brothers did not follow in his footsteps. While they are at whizzes at math and all things tactile, they couldn’t grasp and memorize basic phonics. After they didn’t catch it in Pre-K and Kindergarten what do you do? Keep them in their appropriate “grades” and go back and teach basic phonics!?! I was at a loss! I tried so many things, then someone mentioned All about Reading. It sounded too good to be true. Start at the beginning and just be consistent, thank can do that!! I’m finally proud to say my 8 and 9 year old are READING!! This is all I’ve wanted for several years! We love it so much we switched our 6 year old to it too!! She is rolling and reading good!

Thank you for the hope you give back homeschooling parents!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

This is wonderful! Thank you so much for sharing your experiences and I am so happy to hear how well All About Reading has worked out for your children.

Darlene fehr

says:

My younger son (7) in on level 1 in the All About Reading and is on Lesson 25. He still sounds out almost all the words. Should we wait and master more of the words or just keep pushing ahead??? My daughter who is 5 on the other hand is breezing through and has mastered 99% of the words she should know.

Darlene fehr

says:

My son is currently on level 1 lesson 27 but he has very very few mastered words. Should we keep moving forward or wait and review the word until he gets more down pat?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Darlene,
It sounds like you and your son are doing well. Reaching the goal of fluent reading will be a gradual process over many lessons. Some kids really need a lot of extra practice in the decoding stage, so spend as much time as needed and try not to worry if your student isn’t ready to move on to fluent reading just yet. However, he needs to be able to sound out all the words without difficulty. Here’s an article with more information on Helping Kids Sound Out Words that also explains the blending procedure and challenges that students face with learning this new skill. It also includes some short videos on blending that you may find helpful.

Students may need to read a word thirty times before they can read it fluently without having to sound it out. So, just know that it’s fairly normal to need a lot of practice and review. Here’s an article on How to Develop Reading Fluency that can help you understand the overall scope of achieving fluency. Some ideas that can help:

The Change-the-Word activities are especially helpful for working on blending and paying attention to ALL sounds in a word. Change one letter at a time, starting with simple 3-sound words like: bat-sat-sit-sip-tip-top…and so on. They are also really helpful for working on consonant blends.

The Word Cards allow you to track what has been mastered and what still needs work. Keep word cards in daily review until she can read them easily, without needing to sound them out. Here are some fun review ideas for word cards. The Word cards will stack up as you go so just rotate through a portion for 2-3 minutes each day and then pick up in the book wherever you left off previously. And here’s a fun little video explaining what to do when the cards stack up.

The fluency pages can be re-used as well. You might enjoy our 16 Ways to Make Practice Sheets Fun. (And check out the comments as well–lots of fun suggestions in there!)

The appendices in the level 1 teacher’s manual have lots of ideas for reviewing word cards and fluency pages so be sure to check these for more ideas.

Students who struggle with fluency will also benefit from rereading the same story two or three days in a row to gain fluency and confidence. Buddy Reading can be very powerful in helping students who are in this stage of struggling with fluency.

Rereading the stories will help accomplish these goals:
– Increase word rate
– Improve prosody. Prosody is “expressive reading.” It involves phrasing (grouping words into meaningful phrases), emphasis, and intonation (raising pitch at the end of questions, lowering pitch at the end of sentences)
– Improve automaticity (be able to recognize most words automatically without having to sound them out each time)

Here’s more help with Overcoming Obstacles when Reading AAR Stories.

You can also do a variation of buddy reading called “echo reading.” You read a few sentences with full expression, and then your child reads the same sentences, matching your expression as closely as possible. Do this for approximately five minutes a day, or whatever is a comfortable length of time for your child. Add in lots of praise when your child shows even a bit of improvement.

The “Fun with Emojis” article gives an enjoyable way to work on reading with expression too. This can be a great way to make reading fun that also sneaks in some extra practice from the fluency pages or readers.

To recap, it is fine to keep moving forward slowly but take time to do a lot of review, rereading, and practice. I hope this helps, but please let me know if you have more questions. I’d love to hear how it’s going in a couple of weeks!

Darlene Fehr

says:

It’s been a little over 4 weeks since since you encouraged me with what to next. We have been moving forward quite slowly and rereading the reader at bedtime one or two stories that he has already done. I let him pick any one he wants. He started off with always picking the first story in the first reader. After a week of that he started picking harder stories and picking two stories he wants to read. Also he is really really improving with saying a lot more word fluently. I’m seeing a big difference and he asks to read at night. Just last night he picked a story that we haven’t even read yet in the second book and I let him read it and he was able to read and decode it and he enjoyed it. Thanks so much for the information. I feel like he is now ready to progress at a steadier rate.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Oh, Darlene, I am so excited to read this! I’m so happy to hear how your son is progressing with fluency. I can tell from what you described that he is progressing in confidence in his reading as well! Thank you so much for letting me know how it was going. Keep up the excellent work!

Sarah McFarlane

says:

In 2 weeks, my oldest son will have completed the All About Reading series from start to finish. I highly recommend the program as the lesson plans are ideally written for new home educators and are easily adapted to different learning styles.

My second child struggled with reading at first, but once we began the All About Spelling series, his reading skills quickly accelerated. What began as a tedious chore has grown into something he enjoys. His confidence in reading has helped him with other subjects as well.

The programs are worth every penny!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

How exciting, Sarah! Reaching the end of All About Reading is a big event, and now so much is open to your son!

My youngest’s reading improved after she started All About Spelling as well. It seems to work that way for some kids and it’s a great side-benefit of studying spelling. I love that his confidence in reading is helping him in other subjects!

Thank you for sharing this. Keep up the amazing work!

Gina

says:

We will be doing AAR4 in September for my 10yo son who has Dyslexia. The program has been wonderful.

I’m looking for fun ways to review what he’s learned in 1-3 so he doesn’t forget. Any suggestions would be welcome!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great question, Gina!

After completing All About Reading 1 through 3, students have a strong and wide foundation in reading. One way to keep his skills fresh would be to require him to read for 20 minutes or so daily. I can provide a list of recommendations for you, but what matters most is that he is reading, not what. If he tends to be a word guesser or has fluency struggles, consider having him read aloud to you at least 10 minutes or so most days. That way you can help him use the skills he learned in AAR to sound out words instead of guess and can ensure what he is reading isn’t too difficult for him.

Our blog post on How to Beat the Summer Slide has fun ideas for encouraging reading practice. We also have a blog post 11 Great Ways to Review Reading Word Cards that is full of fun and active ideas for review.

I hope this gives you ideas, but please let me know if you need more. Have a great summer!

gina

says:

Thank you SO much!

Lisa

says:

I am starting AAR with my third child this year. I have done two different reading curricula with my older two children and have been frustrated. I started AAS two years ago with my oldest and LOVED it!! I am excited to try AAR with my youngest this year!!

Bonnie

says:

Great post! My son is finishing the program this year.

Sara

says:

I just ordered AAR Level 4 for my oldest and was just thinking about this question. I love that you articles to address my questions! It’s such a great program and has helped make our second attempt at homeschooling a success!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sara,
I’m happy to hear that this article answered your questions about what happens after you finish All About Reading, but I am even more happy to hear that All About Readin has helped to make your homeschool a success!

Melissa

says:

I have four children, all of which I am homeschooling. I am not very efficient at teaching the reading, AT ALL! My 4th child has had such a blessing, and yet disadvantage. She’s never been in public (or private) school, I have always been her teacher. My 3 older kids all learned to read in public school, and they are AMAZING readers. I have tried a different program with my daughter, but I am going back to AAR as she did not progress very well with our alternate. She should be at about 3rd grade (going on 4th grade) level and she is barely reading at about the 1st grade level (at best). This mama needs AAR :-) Thank You!

Why did I “leave” AAR?, I didn’t know when to say when. I was the one who ended up frustrated, so I changed it up. I couldn’t understand why it seemed she had no clue about what we had just covered. I felt so helpless. I know you offer support! I just felt I needed to try something else for awhile, thinking I’d get back to it much sooner than I have.

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Melissa,

Aw, I’m sorry you ended up frustrated. Teaching reading can be so difficult, and if a child has struggles it can make us moms question everything. I hope AAR goes getter for you this time, and do feel free to email with questions or for extra ideas any time.

Stacy

says:

Great post! My daughter is very close to moving from learning to read to reading to learn.

Dena

says:

My oldest daughter just finished Level 4 this week! She was so excited!

Beth

says:

Thank you for posting these guides. I feel I am constantly looking for books or ideas for my son and with a second reader with different interests these additional resources will help!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Beth. We add new book reviews regularly, so check back occasionally too.

Robin

says:

This s awesome! We’re only about halfway through level 2 but I’ve been thinking about this. I really appreciate all the extra info and ideas on your site.

Jennifer

says:

Thank you for the great suggestions!

aCog

says:

My daughter will soon complete AAR Level 1 and it has been such a rewarding process! Marking the progress chart at the end of each lesson is an added bonus for her.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Some children so find a lot of motivation and satisfaction from the progress charts.

Abigail's Mommy

says:

This is very helpful. Thank you.

Elena

says:

These are some good tips and suggestions. I was looking into some options for teaching my child to read, and decided to start using “All about reading”, as it seems to be a good choice for my child’s learning style. I was pleased to see that there’s a lot of articles, post and such on the website and social media pages to help parents and make learning a good experience.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Elena,
Thank you for letting us know that our blog articles are appreciated!

TIffany Cooper

says:

I appreciate all these ideas. I am looking forward to moving forward with AAR. My first grader recently started level 2.

Erica Eastman

says:

My 3rd child is just starting the “learn to read” stage. We love and use All About Spelling with our 2 oldest kids, and I’m considering All About Reading for my 4 upcoming readers. Thank you for providing encouragement and wonderful resources to keep kids progressing and learning even after the basics of reading have been mastered.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Erica,
We are glad to you have found our blog to be encouraging and helpful. Please let us know if you have any questions about All About Reading.

Lynda

says:

My daughter is just finishing up the first level of AAR, but I wondered what would should happen after she completes level four. I am saving this post for future reference.

Nicole Compton

says:

My daughter looks forward to her reading lessons everyday! And I cannot believe the progress she has made after only completing AAR level 1 and cannot wait to see what are is able to read after AAR Level 2!

Xaviera

says:

I am working with six kids who are struggling readers, we are halfway into AAR level 1 and their growth has been astounding! The imbedding reading strategies and modelled practice have been monumental to their success this year.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Xaviera,
Thank you for letting us know just how well your students are doing. It’s wonderful!

Jessica

says:

I can’t wait until we can get to this point. I’ll definitely be taking a photo when we get there.

Leave a Comment