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What Happens after All About Reading?

What Happens After All About Reading - from All About Learning Press

If your child has recently finished All About Reading, my first piece of advice to you is to celebrate! Have a piece of cake. Call up Grandma and Grandpa. Take the rest of the day off and go to the park.

And of course, don’t forget to document this milestone and send us a photo! It makes my day when we hear from kids like Katie who complete our program!

The accomplishment feels fantastic, doesn’t it?

Now your child has a rock-solid base upon which to grow in reading ability–and after you celebrate, you can come back to this article for some ideas about what comes next.

But before we dig into specifics, let’s take a quick look at the big picture.

The Two Major Stages of Reading

There are two major stages of reading: “Learn to Read” and “Read to Learn.”

After your child has competed four levels of All About Reading, she’s officially done with the “Learn to Read” stage.

She now has the phonics and word attack skills necessary to sound out just about any familiar word. She can figure out words by dividing them into syllables, making analogies to other words, sounding out the word with the accent on different word parts, and recognizing suffixes and prefixes.

Now your child is ready for the next major reading stage: “Read to Learn.”

At this stage, reading is used to gain knowledge. Your child will grow in her ability to react to information and connect ideas. The possibilities for her to explore the world around her are limitless, and she can embark on this exploration through reference books, trade books, text books, magazines, and an endless array of literature. Ideally, this stage has no end; your child will “read to learn” for the rest of her school career—and beyond.

Recommendations for the “Read to Learn” Stage

The “Read to Learn” stage does not require formal instruction like the “Learn to Read” stage does. As your child moves away from learning to read, her knowledge and vocabulary should grow and her reading should become more automatic. But that doesn’t always happen entirely on its own. You will need to be proactive to ensure that your child continues to grow as a reader and as a learner.

Have your child read for 30 minutes every day.

Help your child choose reading material that is interesting to him, both fiction (such as great chapter books) and nonfiction (such as kid-friendly magazines). For more ideas, check out resources such as Honey for a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt and Books for Boys and Children Who Would Rather Make Forts All Day (from IEW’s free download page).

Work on building your child’s vocabulary.

For most kids, reading and being read to are the best ways to do this. But for some great practical tips, be sure to check out this comprehensive article about building your child’s vocabulary.

What About Literature?

A study of literature is an important component of the “Read to Learn” stage, but for many kids, studying literature can easily become a “drag.” Remember, your goal during the “Read to Learn” stage is to encourage reading and to help your child continue to develop fluency and confidence, so it’s important to let your child be drawn into the joy of reading.

How do you make a study of literature more interesting? Here are a few ideas.

  • Engage in discussions about things in the book that interest your child.
  • Have your child search for great descriptive writing that really pulls her into the story.
  • Discuss a character that your child empathizes with. How does she feel about a choice the character makes? Would she make the same choice that the character makes?
  • Is there a particularly interesting setting or theme in the story?
  • Discuss a character in the story that your child would like to know in real life.
  • Discuss how the story relates to an interesting period in history that you have studied with your child. How does understanding that history help you understand the story?

While encouraging your child to read independently is important, reading good literature aloud to your child is a great way to model your own thought processes. This will help your child learn to engage more effectively with what she’s reading, and will help her grow more confident in her own comprehension ability.

Whether your child reads alone or together with you, be sure that your discussions are light and natural. You’ll have a good feel for how well your child is understanding the reading as you talk with her about the book or story. Too much “analysis” can make a child dread reading, or worse, make her think she isn’t doing it “right.”

If you are looking for a more formal approach to teaching literature, here are a few literature guides our customers have found helpful.

Please Share Your Experience!

Has your child finished All About Reading Level 4? Share a photo on Facebook or Instagram, or email it to us at photos@allaboutlearningpress.com. We’d love to celebrate with you!

And if you have ideas for encouraging the “Read to Learn” stage, please share in the comments below.

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Leave a Comment

Lisa

says:

I am starting AAR with my third child this year. I have done two different reading curricula with my older two children and have been frustrated. I started AAS two years ago with my oldest and LOVED it!! I am excited to try AAR with my youngest this year!!

Bonnie

says:

Great post! My son is finishing the program this year.

Sara

says:

I just ordered AAR Level 4 for my oldest and was just thinking about this question. I love that you articles to address my questions! It’s such a great program and has helped make our second attempt at homeschooling a success!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sara,
I’m happy to hear that this article answered your questions about what happens after you finish All About Reading, but I am even more happy to hear that All About Readin has helped to make your homeschool a success!

Melissa

says:

I have four children, all of which I am homeschooling. I am not very efficient at teaching the reading, AT ALL! My 4th child has had such a blessing, and yet disadvantage. She’s never been in public (or private) school, I have always been her teacher. My 3 older kids all learned to read in public school, and they are AMAZING readers. I have tried a different program with my daughter, but I am going back to AAR as she did not progress very well with our alternate. She should be at about 3rd grade (going on 4th grade) level and she is barely reading at about the 1st grade level (at best). This mama needs AAR :-) Thank You!

Why did I “leave” AAR?, I didn’t know when to say when. I was the one who ended up frustrated, so I changed it up. I couldn’t understand why it seemed she had no clue about what we had just covered. I felt so helpless. I know you offer support! I just felt I needed to try something else for awhile, thinking I’d get back to it much sooner than I have.

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Melissa,

Aw, I’m sorry you ended up frustrated. Teaching reading can be so difficult, and if a child has struggles it can make us moms question everything. I hope AAR goes getter for you this time, and do feel free to email with questions or for extra ideas any time.

Stacy

says:

Great post! My daughter is very close to moving from learning to read to reading to learn.

Dena

says:

My oldest daughter just finished Level 4 this week! She was so excited!

Beth

says:

Thank you for posting these guides. I feel I am constantly looking for books or ideas for my son and with a second reader with different interests these additional resources will help!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Beth. We add new book reviews regularly, so check back occasionally too.

Robin

says:

This s awesome! We’re only about halfway through level 2 but I’ve been thinking about this. I really appreciate all the extra info and ideas on your site.

Jennifer

says:

Thank you for the great suggestions!

aCog

says:

My daughter will soon complete AAR Level 1 and it has been such a rewarding process! Marking the progress chart at the end of each lesson is an added bonus for her.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Some children so find a lot of motivation and satisfaction from the progress charts.

Abigail's Mommy

says:

This is very helpful. Thank you.

Elena

says:

These are some good tips and suggestions. I was looking into some options for teaching my child to read, and decided to start using “All about reading”, as it seems to be a good choice for my child’s learning style. I was pleased to see that there’s a lot of articles, post and such on the website and social media pages to help parents and make learning a good experience.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Elena,
Thank you for letting us know that our blog articles are appreciated!

TIffany Cooper

says:

I appreciate all these ideas. I am looking forward to moving forward with AAR. My first grader recently started level 2.

Erica Eastman

says:

My 3rd child is just starting the “learn to read” stage. We love and use All About Spelling with our 2 oldest kids, and I’m considering All About Reading for my 4 upcoming readers. Thank you for providing encouragement and wonderful resources to keep kids progressing and learning even after the basics of reading have been mastered.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Erica,
We are glad to you have found our blog to be encouraging and helpful. Please let us know if you have any questions about All About Reading.

Lynda

says:

My daughter is just finishing up the first level of AAR, but I wondered what would should happen after she completes level four. I am saving this post for future reference.

Nicole Compton

says:

My daughter looks forward to her reading lessons everyday! And I cannot believe the progress she has made after only completing AAR level 1 and cannot wait to see what are is able to read after AAR Level 2!

Jessica

says:

I can’t wait until we can get to this point. I’ll definitely be taking a photo when we get there.

My oldest is almost halfway through level 4. Looking forward to the next stage with her! I can tell she’s already beginning to transition into the second stage herself!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Rebekah,
Yes, we have seen that transition happen naturally with many, maybe even most, students as they move through AAR 4. It’s an exciting stage of reading!

Christine Nadolny

says:

We are getting close to this stage. This article helped a lot. It should be fun to read to learn and continue their comprehension skills.

Kristyne

says:

Thanks for the advise on what to do when we complete AAR. We are just about to start level 4 and AAR has been a huge help to my dyslexic daughter. She now has tools that make sense to her on how words are made up and how to sound them out.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kristyne,
As you begin AAR 4, the end is in sight!

Amanda O'Neal

says:

My oldest son is on his last level of All About Reading. Thanks for the recommendations!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amanda,
How exciting to be so near the end of All About Reading!

Trina

says:

We are almost done with Level 1 and these were some helpful tips!

Marisa

says:

There are a lot of good resources in this article. Thank you!

Julia Carvalho

says:

Very useful resource. Thank you!

Jessica

says:

Thank you for this post! We are almost done with AAR 4 and wondering what to do next. Love this!

Maureen

says:

Good read!!! My daughter was just diagnosed with dyslexia and you guys are right on point!

Kristy

says:

I have previously been told by AALP that it isn’t necessarily necessary to do all four levels. We are currently on level two. I do love the program but am unsure about doing all four levels. How would you decide whether to keep going after level two or level three?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kristy,
Most student will benefit from completing all four levels of All About Reading. At the end of AAR 4, students have the phonics and word attack skills necessary to sound out high school level words, though they may not know the meaning of all higher level words.(Word attack skills include things like dividing words into syllables, making analogies to other words, sounding out the word with the accent on different word parts, recognizing affixes, etc…)

Occasionally a child will take off in reading and won’t need the next level of All About Reading. You can tell this if your student can easily read the sample stories from near the end of the next level. The placement tests can also help you decide. We can give you lists of the harder words covered in each level so you can get an idea as well. If your child doesn’t find the words and stories of the higher levels easy, then there is something he or she can learn from continuing.

Also, if you check out the Scope and Sequences for Levels 3 and 4, you will see that they cover a lot beyond phonograms. These levels cover things like literary analysis for comprehension (for example, making predictions and inferences, comparing and contrasting main characters and stories, discussing the main conflict and character transformation), as well as literary terms (hyperbole, simile, point of view, and more), reading reference materials, reading with expression, English words with Greek, French, Spanish, and Italian influences, morphology, and much more.

I hope this answers your question. Please let us know if you have any further questions.

stacey

says:

Great Idea. I think I’ll do that with each level to get my daughter excited about the next one.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Stacey,
We often share photos on our Facebook page of children with their Certificate of Completion as they finish each level. It’s fun to see so many children progressing!

Jessica Hughes

says:

My oldest is still working through Level 1 of AAR, but I am so eager for him to reach this point!

Kristin

says:

We’ve been through all levels of AAS with my oldest kids and are now starting AAR with my youngest struggling reader. We know it will be what finally works for her. Great products here!

Lisa

says:

I’ve read so many reviews about how great this program is. I’m thrilled to see photos of kids as successful readers.

Char

says:

I’m super excited to try this!

AJ

says:

Thanks for the additional tips. It’s nice having ideas for what to do next.

Erin Petrocelli

says:

Thank you for the list of literature guides!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Erin.

Jackie C

says:

We just finished AAR 3. What lexile level is this. I would like my child to pick some of his own books.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jackie,
We don’t use Lexile measurements for All About Reading. Typically these are used for literature-based reading programs and general books rather than controlled, phonics-based readers. The criteria used to develop Lexile levels means that longer sentences and words of lower frequency lead to higher Lexile measures; shorter sentences and words of higher frequency lead to lower Lexile measures.

The AAR books are almost 100% decodable, but because of longer sentence length and the inclusion of lower frequency words, the Lexile measurement would not be very accurate. A book with a lower Lexile measurement might include words with more difficult phonetic patterns for example. All About Reading groups words in a logical manner based on similar rules or patterns regardless of their supposed grade level or Lexile level, which allows students to progress quickly and confidently.

That being said, we have found that children finishing AAR 3 are often picking up chapter books on a 3rd or 4th grade level or higher on their own and enjoying them. However, if your son hasn’t begun reading books of his own choosing yet I recommend aiming a bit lower to build up his confidence and enjoyment. I’d love to give you a list of choices, but there is so much he could read now that it would be hard to make such a list. Rather, I recommend going to the library and speaking with your children’s librarian about what things he likes. Choose 3 or 4 titles that the librarian recommends, and then give one of them a go. If it’s not a good fit, try another.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have further questions.

Lauren

says:

I love this post! Thank you for making the connection of reading to learn. Such a focus is on learning to read but not the “why” and what we can do with that essential skill! I love the conversational aspect of reading so it is more automatic not a mountain to climb. Although once you climb a mountain that does feel pretty good too :)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lauren,
Reading to learn about the world is the purpose of learning to read. Keeping that goal in mind can help us during the frustrating days when the mountain seems too high. Thank you for this lovely metaphor!

Wendy

says:

Thanks for all the great tips!

Angel

says:

Trying to give my 7 year old some additional resources than just the schools.

Danielle

says:

Thanks for the great literature recommendations! My started our daughter on level 2 and finished it several months ago. It was such an improvement and boosted her confidence immensely! She now begs for new books and wants to read constantly.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Danielle,
It sounds like your daughter is doing very well!

Merrita

says:

Thank you very much for your insight. As a person who struggled with reading I am always looking for ways to make sure that doesn’t happen to my child.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry to hear of your struggles with reading, Merrita.

Here are some ways that All About Reading can help kids with learning to read:

– Each lesson time is simple and explicit, and will include 3 simple steps: review of what was learned the day before, a simple new teaching, and a short practice of that new teaching.

– Incremental lessons. AAR breaks every teaching down into its most basic steps and then teaches the lessons in a logical order, carrying the students from one concept or skill to the next. Each step builds on the one the student has already mastered.

– AAR is multisensory. Research has shown that when a child is taught through all three pathways at the same time, a method known as simultaneous multisensory instruction, he will learn significantly more than when taught only through his strongest pathway.

– AAR uses specially color-coded letter tiles. Working with the All About Reading letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept.

– AAR is scripted, so you can concentrate on your child. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage.

– AAR has built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning difficulties generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. With AAR, your child will have a Reading Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows.

– AAR has lots of fluency practice. One of the things that Marie noticed when she was researching reading programs is that few programs have enough review built in for kids who struggle to gain fluency. AAR has fluency sheets or a story to be read with every lesson, so children can practice reading smoothly with expression and confidence.

All About Reading has a one-year guarantee. You can try it, and if for any reason you feel that it isn’t the right match for your child, return it for a full refund.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Ashley

says:

I’m planning to read the classics with my kids.

Kelly Barcroft

says:

Great information. Thanks for the article. Am interested in the All About Learning Program!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kelly,
Please let us know if you have questions.

Sonja Rea

says:

I’m very interested in trying this curriculum. Thank you for posting such great info!

A Schroder

says:

We just received our Level 1 curriculum this week. I have already seen improvement with my 6yr old twins and we just started! So very excited!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Wow, that’s great that you are seeing improvement in less than a week! Your children are off to a great start!

A. Reed

says:

Great article. Thank you for the links.

Cathryn

says:

Can’t wait until we can get to this read to learn stage!

Jenn Khurshid

says:

We are still in the learn to read stage with my younger daughter. I know she be on to the next stage before I know it!

Sarah

says:

Thanks for the info!

Kara L. Carder

says:

I have four boys ages 10, 9, 7 & 4. Three of them are special needs. This is extremely helpful information for me, thank you so much!

Amy C

says:

This is helpful information as my twins just started AAR level 4, and it is nice to know what we will be doing afterwards. I also wanted to ask, could/should they start reading to learn on their own even before we finish AAR4? One of my twins has already read a few chapter books on her own (actually started about a year ago). The other one isn’t quite as interested, but is probably capable as well….So I guess I am just wondering if/when to start that daily reading on their own…

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
Most children do start reading in their free time in AAR 3 or sooner, but not all. It is reasonable to ask your daughter to read for 10 minutes or so outside of her AAR 4 lesson time, but it isn’t necessary. It can help her in her reading, but if she is resistant it could make her dislike reading more. Make this decision with your daughter’s unique personality and needs in mind.

If you do decide to have her read in addition to her AAR 4 lesson time, allow her a lot of freedom in choosing books. If she wants to read easy books, even super easy ones like Dr. Seuss, let her. Easy books will give her confidence and over time she will move to harder and harder titles of her own accord. On the other hand, if she wants to read a book that you think is too hard, still let her attempt it. It may take her a month or more to read a hard book, but she will be learning and stretching her reading the whole time. However, if she starts a hard book and wants to stop before she finishes, allow her to do that too. Basically, this additional reading time would be a time where she can exercise control over her reading, and as long as the book isn’t morally objectionable to you, allow her to pick whatever she wants.

I hope this helps, but please let me know if you have further questions.

Renae B

says:

Helpful article. Will refer back to this once we get to that point! We love this program.

Saph

says:

Thanks for the great recommendations and book list!!

Robyn

says:

Excited to try it!

Karen

says:

Thanks for the study guide info. I am looking forward to checking the Books for Boys Who Would Rather Build Forts.

Cindy

says:

We are about to finish Level 4 and I am so excited to launch my reader into the world of literature! We have been reading great lit all along but he feels so excited to “graduate” into the world of unassisted reading :). Thanks for your amazing program! #almost1down3kidstogo

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Cindy,
What an exciting time for you and your student!

Martina

says:

We are loving this level! My son loves the stories!

Victoria

says:

Thank you so much for clarifying what comes next!! We are on level 2 getting ready for level 3!! So excited to see what the future holds!

We are really enjoying AAR and AAS. We are currently using AAR 2 for our son and The kindergarten one for our youngest daughter. Our older daughter is on AAS3. I would call this curriculum totally stress free. We all love it.

Allison

says:

Looking forward to the day my daughter begins reading to learn – it is so awesome once they reach that milestone!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Allison,
It is awesome when students move from learning to read to reading to learn!

Zakia

says:

I love is program thanks

Lacey

says:

Thank you so much for this! My oldest child finished AAR last school year and I wasn’t sure where to go from there. This post confirmed that we’re headed in the right direction.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lacey,
I’m happy to hear that you and your child have made the transition to after AAR so well. Even though your child has finished AAR, still feel free to ask us if you have any questions!

kellie kopp

says:

This is just what we needed! Wish we would have found it sooner:-)

Bev

says:

Thanks for the pointers!

lindsey

says:

we love all about reading it has been such a lifesaver.

Annika

says:

I want to try this program for my 5 year old!

Chelsea

says:

Sounds exciting!

Anita

says:

We hope to finish Level 4 over the summer.

Jody R.

says:

Thank you! I was wondering what to do once my daughter finished.

Jenn chen

says:

This is very useful for the future! Thanks!

Mary

says:

I am excited to try all about reading for my kindergartener. We are using all about spelling for my second-grader, and it is her favorite subject now! Thank you for helping to build her confidence.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Mary,
Confidence is an important part of successful learning. We are happy to have helped your daughter have confidence in spelling!

Becki

says:

Great info. We aren’t there yet, but my oldest is almost done with level 3. Although I don’t think the next step will be a problem as my oldest two both started devouring books after level 1!

Rachel

says:

Thanks for the great info!

Julia Mary

says:

Love these ideas! With lots of boys, the resource about ‘books for boys who would rather build forts” sound perfect!

Dee Anne

says:

Great post for what to do next. We love AAR and AAS! It has been such a breathe of fresh air in our homeschool learning.

Sulkee Kim

says:

I like All About Spelling. It has step-by-step instructions.

Barbie

says:

Each day during breaks from formal lessons, my sons retreat to a reading nook, & take turns reading to one another from a book of their choice. In winter they usually escape to the cozy area I’ve set up on the top bunk bed. In summer, they’ve read on a picnic blanket, or in a tent in the garden. I may ask them to tell me a little about the stories when they return to class, but I don’t press them for formal narrations or great detail. It is their time to delight in adventures together without their teacher’s (a.k.a. Mum!) interference. They love reading together, and I believe they will treasure this time for the rest of their lives.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Barbie,
This sound wonderful! What a great experience for your boys, and what great memories they are making together.

Dawn

says:

Always enjoy these emails/blog posts! The hints and activities are often exactly what we need to get over the next “hump” with my middle children. Wish I had heard about AAR years ago for my oldest. Hoping to save up and get for the youngest 2. AAS has been a blessing.

Jillian Grifhorst

says:

A curriculum I’ve found recently that goes along with all of the “after AAR” recommendations you’re making is called “Drawn into the Heart of Reading;” it’s found at Heart of Dakota curriculum. I love that it covers a variety of genres and literary elements, while giving you the freedom to choose whichever literature within those parameter you want. This allows for more student choice based on interest! I can see how this approach will foster a lifelong love for learning.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for the recommendation, Jillian. It sounds like a wonderful after AAR 4 program!

Kari

says:

We are really enjoying the AAR and AAS programs. We learn everyday with joy and without struggles. That was not my schooling experience! I’m so happy I can give my kids a better experience in school than I had. Thank you for this product, it is worth its weight in gold.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Kari! I find it wonderful that we are helping to give your children a joyous learning experience.

Emily

says:

We are almost ready to start AAR 4! Can’t wait for DS to graduate to the “read to learn” stage. :)

Malaya

says:

AAR has been so helpful to my 6 year old. She wasn’t doing well with two other reading programs. We started with AAR 1. The start was slow and sometimes I think we would have been better to go even slower but she is doing so much better. I look forward to the ” reading to learn ” phase but for now I am enjoying the ” learning to read” again.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Malaya,
I am so happy to hear that AAR is helping your daughter succeed with spelling, AND helping you to enjoy teaching it again.

Erika

says:

I stumbled upon AAR while searching for a good reading curriculum for my son. We’re from the Philippines and even though English is our second language, I’m finding it hard to teach reading o my 4-yr old. Excited to try AAR this year!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Erika,
We have had great reports from both parents use second language is English and for using AAR with children whose second language is English. Here is a blog post describing one family’s experience.

Tamara Abboud

says:

I love those book resources too… we use them to help us guide our read-alouds. :)

Crystal Parish

says:

We love AAR. Both of my kids are injoying learning to reading.

Dawn Brown

says:

We LOVE All About Reading! My boys are thriving with it!!

Nikki

says:

My son is dyslexic and spent K and 1st grade struggling in the public school system. He absolutely hated reading because it was such a struggle. We have homeschooled for the past 2 years, and he has made amazing progress with AAR. While I still can’t say he “likes” to read, it definitely is not as much of a struggle for him. I continue to hold out hope that one day reading will be something he enjoys. Thank you!

Laurie

says:

My son also struggled with learning to read. In 3rd and 4th grade I required him to read 30 minutes a day – but in two 15 minute segments, which was much more manageable for him. Eventually, decoding became automatic, and he could pay more attention to understanding what he was reading. After that, his enjoyment in reading increased by leaps and bounds, and he would choose to read in his spare time.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for sharing how your son went from struggling to choosing to read in his spare time, Laurie. This is a great example of the Matthew Effect in Reading.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Nikki,
We are happy to know that AAR has been such a help to your son and that he has progressed so well. Continue to read aloud to him and continue to have him read daily. Someday he will find pleasure in reading.

Angie Langford

says:

I have really enjoyed using AAR! My daughter who used to grumble and complain about reading is now enjoying chapter books on her own. Thank you! Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

That is great, Angie! A new reader is in the world!

Magela Gonzalez

says:

This article is very helpful to me as my son is entering the Read to Learn stage. Thank you!!

Nikki Howell

says:

What timing for this article. I was just telling my husband that my boys only had one more year of AAR and he asked what was after that. My answer “no clue!” So it is great to see this write up of ideas of things to look for!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Nikki,
I love when our articles just happen to be such great timing for your readers. Now you can tell your husband that you do know what is next!

Ericca

says:

I’m so glad we stumbled upon AAR. This school year was our first and and I’m really looking forward to continuing with the next level of this program in the fall. We’re also excited about adding AAS to our arsenal. Thanks for the tips in this blog. Although we’re still working through the Learn to Read stage it’s great to consider the tips given above so we’ll know how best to transition into the Read to Learn stage later. Thanks for the helpful information.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Erica. It’s great to hear that AAR has been a good fit for your first year of homeschooling.

Marjorie Anderson

says:

I can’t believe we are almost there, we are at our halfway mark in AAR. Glad to have this blog post I was beginning to wonder about what comes next.

Ashley

says:

I just purchased AAR, I’m so excited to start it with my 4 year old.

Amy A

says:

I’m really excited to start AAR with my son! He struggles with reading & I’m hoping this will help him!! Thank you for all your encouraging posts!!!

The “What about Literature?” article was very helpful! Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

We are happy to be helpful, Crystal. You are welcome.

Jessica

says:

Thanks for all the recommendations of great resources.

I always enjoy this site. My oldest is just starting to learn to read so am thinking about getting this program.

Katie

says:

I have been so pleased with the excitement and success my son has seen with this program, if you are on the fence, jump, it is an amazing way to teach reading

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Katie!

Amy

says:

I’ve been using the all about reading and spelling programs with my 4 sons. We’ve tried another spelling program but they weren’t happy with the lack of rules to figure out how to spell so we are returning to AAS. AAR is perfect for us too.

Renee

says:

Looking forward to this day! We’re only in the Pre-Reading Level, but my kids eagerly await the arrival of Ziggy (whom they call Zippy!) each day…

Jennifer Marseille

says:

Great info!

kelly

says:

my son is dyslexic so repetition is the key for him. slow and steady has been the key to moving forward for us. One tip I have is on shutterfly they sometimes give freebies (you have to pay shipping) but I made a helping verbs matching game and that has been a great way for him to review (and read) with out realizing he is practicing to read!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kelly,
Yes, lots of review is a necessary component of learning for a child with dyslexia. Great tip about the Shutterfly freebies. Thanks!

Jana

says:

What a timely post! My oldest is scheduled to finish Level 4 on Thursday, and I was just getting online to plan the “what’s next.” Thank you so much for this amazing program! We will be sending in our photo soon. :-)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jana,
What timing! Congratulations on your first AAR graduate. How exciting! We look forward to seeing your photo.

I am excited about this reading program. I’ve used another one with several of my older children, but felt I was missing something important and I think AAR covers the aspects we were missing. I’m looking forward to completing the program and moving on with my kids into the fun of learning from books.

Tina Emezi

says:

I have heard endlessly about how great this program is from many of the homeschool moms in tge co-op group we attend. I am starting my son on AAR level 1 although we just finished the Evans-moor phonics level B and my son was not thrilled with it. I am also happy I read this article because I was pondering what cane next.

Rachelle Oliver

says:

I appreciate the comprehension questions you posted. That is an area I need to improve on when reading with my kids!

Jill Morris

says:

I wasn’t aware of AAR with my first child, but look forward to using it with my second child. My first child is on AAS2 and we love it!

Kynina

says:

I absolutely love this program. It has truly made it easy for me as a homeschooling parent teaching 3 young boys, one who has been struggling with phonics and reading!!
Thank you.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kynina,
We’re happy to hear that All About Reading is helping make teaching reading easy for you!

Becky

says:

My youngest is using All About Reading. She loves it!! We are just finishing Level 1. Three of my children use All About Spelling. I love seeing them learning to read, but the time when they hit the reading to learn stage is golden! This will be my first time seeing it with AAR.

Sara

says:

I love the “read to learn” stage. Thanks for some great tips!

Melissa

says:

Thank you, this is helpful. My oldest can read relatively well, but I’d say he is somewhere in between the 2 stages. He lacks confidence and doesn’t yet want to read much for the fun of it. After purchasing your program for his younger sister, we decided to start him your program also to hopefully fill in some of the gaps and make him a more confident reader.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melissa,
Let us know if you need help with placement. Students that are already reading can start higher than level 1. These placement tests should get you started.

Lauren

says:

Good ideas to keep in mind as we work through and finish AAR!

Melanie

says:

We struggled a lot trying to figure out what to do next after taking our kids through a *much less* comprehensive reading program, so I really appreciate the thought put into what comes next after AAR! My kids are currently in levels 1 & 2. Sounds like the transition will be much more natural, and I think that reflects well on the program!! I’m excited for what is to come. Thank you thank you for building such an amazing program!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Melanie,
You are welcome, and I am glad that this blog post is helping you be excited for what is to come. The transition after AAR should be natural.

Deann H

says:

We use the Memoria Press Literature Guides with my child who completed All About Reading and she loves them! We take breaks between the guides for a few months each time, and she always begs to do them again. It is a fun way to continue reading!

Bethel

says:

Thanks! This is what I was thinking about doing with my daughter as well. She is in the first grade, but will finish AAR 3 by Easter this year and then will complete AAR 4 in second grade, so I had already started to plan for what’s next. Thanks for your input that your child likes those so much. I will get to look at them closer at this May’s homeschool convention.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for letting us know how well your daughter enjoys the Memoria Press Literature Guides, Deann. They sound great!

Candace

says:

Already my kids love to read…they are 8 and 5. I credit it to AAR and the confidence it gives!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

We love confident readers, Candace! :D

Melissa Lohr

says:

just bought All About Spelling, and am very excited to use it with my Dyslexic child

Nemanja ignjatovic

says:

I love this program. My 6 year old is doing great learning from it. It is easy for me as the teacher as well.

Carrie

says:

Thank you for the link to the chapter books!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Carrie! We post a new chapter book review every couple of months, so check back later too.

Ali

says:

I love to read and hope that my kids will too once we finish our level 4. Thanks for the ideas.

Annette

says:

good ideas

Bethany Furness

says:

You can start the “read to learn” stage even before you kids finish “learning to read” by reading aloud and having those great discussions. I think it makes the transition feel more natural to the student, and maybe even offers encouragement or an incentive to keeping working towards reading well.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yes, we completely agree, Bethany! We are strong proponents of reading aloud to children, even after they have finished AAR 4 and are reading to learn well themselves. We recommend reading aloud from a wide range of genres, including non-fiction.

Desiree Nelson

says:

My boys love being read too! I’m so excited to begin the AAR lessons so they can enjoying reading to me!

Kara

says:

Great article. I was wondering what came next after AAR4. Thank you!

Summer

says:

Just stating the program with two of my children! Can’t wait!

We are almost finished with level 4! Can’t wait to share a picture!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

We can’t wait to see it, Annie!

Thank you for this info! It was very helpful.

Veronica

says:

Thank you, very helpful information!

Renae

says:

Perfect timing on this post! Thank you.

Dawn

says:

My daughter (10) just finished AAR level 2. Yea! Looking forward to purchasing level 3 next. We are about half way through AAS level 2. I love that the AAS refers to reading stories in the AAR books! My daughter loves to go back and re-read those stories and it is such a pleasure to hear her reading those quite fluently! It was a rocky road to reading before starting this series. Thank you!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Dawn,
I’m happy to hear your daughter is finally having success in reading after struggling. Keep up the great work!

Juill

says:

We’re finishing up Level 1 but this post still helps with questions about what comes next. Thanks!

Tammie

says:

My daughter loves the reading program here…she looks forward to it every day!

Leslie

says:

We love AAR and AAS! This is our first year using it. The kids and I have learned so much since we started. I am very excited to order again for next school year.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for letting us know how well things are going, Leslie!

Carrie

says:

We are about halfway through AAR level 1 and I am so thankful you have made this product available. I am looking forward to the next level all the way to “reading to learn.” Thank you.

Sandi W

says:

Teaching them to read is such a daunting task. Thanks for this program. Certainly makes it easier.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Sandi. As a mom of struggling learners, I completely agree too. All About Reading does make it easier.

I think the biggest thing I can do to encourage my kids to read to learn is modeling. If we have a question and I show them how reading can answer it, they learn the importance of books. And when I read for enjoyment, they see how enjoyable books can be. For my struggling reader, I’ve never had to worry about her desire to read, only her ability. My husband and I are both total bookworms and have modeled a love of books for her since she was born. I think that naturally flows into reading to learn.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Debra,
This is an excellent point. If you want your children to be readers, let them see you reading!

Lori

says:

Can’t wait to start using AAS 1 soon!

Teia

says:

Sounds interesting

Melinda Roberts

says:

Would love to try this

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