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Motivation to Read: 10 Tips for Preschoolers

young boy smiling

What Is Motivation to Read?

A child who has motivation to read wants to learn to read. He has gotten the message that reading is fun and thinks “It’s something I want to do soon!” He’s eager and willing.

Children who are motivated to read have discovered delight between the covers of books. And this motivation is so important when the time comes to begin reading instruction! Learning to read is a gradual, ongoing process, and having that enthusiasm for books helps get kids over any hurdles that may arise.

Motivation to read may seem like a simple thing, but if your child doesn’t have that internal desire, teaching him to read will be quite challenging. Let’s do a quick assessment to see if your child has it.

Quick Check for Motivation to Read

The following signs indicate that your child is motivated to read and understands that reading can be fun.

Print awareness blue check mark

Your child enjoys being read to, at least for short periods of time.

Print awareness purple check mark

Your child pretends to read or write.

Print awareness green check mark

Your child frequently requests read-aloud time and shows a general enthusiasm for books.

10 Easy Ways to Encourage Motivation to Read

The tips below will help you create a reading “culture” in your home that encourages the motivation to read.

Open book with illustration

Start early! Reading with your babies and toddlers helps them connect books with love and comfort. Try board books, books with high contrast illustrations, and books with interesting textures.

Bookmarked book

Read it again. Young children enjoy anticipating what comes next. Use this to your child’s advantage. When stories contain predictable text or rhymes, your child may be able to finish the sentences. And when you read the same story repeatedly, he may be able to recite part of the story from memory.

Car graphic

Go “on location.” Reading becomes an adventure when you can connect a book to a real place. Reading about animals? Visit a farm or a zoo. Reading about frogs? Visit a pond. Too far for a visit? Find pictures online to help your child feel connected to what you’re reading about.

Crayons graphic

Let them wiggle! Some kids get uncomfortable when they have to sit still—they just want to go, go, go! But read-alouds are important for wigglers too, so let them wiggle! Coloring, kneading playdough, or building with LEGO bricks can keep hands busy while you read. Interactive books help, too!

Recipe cards

Set an example. Show your child that you also read. Motivation to read is most effectively developed when it is modeled. Let your child see that reading is important, whether it’s reading a book for pleasure, reading to learn, or reading a recipe to make dinner!

Books lined up

Head to the library. Libraries are often filled with resources for children—summer reading programs, story times, craft classes, and of course, shelves and shelves of books! If you want to surround your child with books, there’s no better place than the library. Download our free library lists for great picture book ideas!

Stacked books

Build your own library. The more books you have at home, the more opportunities your child will have to pick one up and read. Don’t want to break the bank? Rummage sales, library book sales, resale shops, and bookstore clearance racks are great places to find affordable books.

Books in a crate

Make books accessible. If you store books in a visible, easy-to-reach spot, it’s more likely your child will pick one up and start exploring it. Keep books on a low bookshelf or in a basket on the floor, or allow your child to choose her own special spot just for her books.

Happy and sad emojis

Bring stories to life. Capture your child’s attention and make reading fun by reading with expression. Try using different voices for different characters. Exaggerate the rhythm of the text. Let your face and your voice show what the characters are feeling.

Path in a park

Change it up! If you normally read in the same place each day, don’t hesitate to try out a new location from time to time. When the weather is nice, read on the front porch or a bench at the park. Create a reading nook to make story time extra special.

Motivation to Read Is One of the Big Five Skills

Motivation to read is one of the five critical skills for reading readiness that we call the Big Five Skills. The other four skills are:

If you’re ready to tackle the rest of the Big Five Skills, be sure to check out the All About Reading Pre-reading program. Your student will enjoy special games, crafts, and story time read-alouds, and you will love the way your student effortlessly learns essential pre-reading skills.

All About Reading Pre-reading

Do you have more ideas for encouraging motivation to read? What do you do with your own preschoolers and kindergarteners? Post in the comments below!

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Carol

says:

We love these ideas! Time to get my youngest started on letter recognition, and reading reading reading is a great way to motivate!

Sarah

says:

I love this! Thank you!

Sandy Grant

says:

My 11yo son just finished up AAR Level 4. He has all the tools and can really read almost any word but he is SO slow. He still insists that he “can’t read” even though I tell him he can read just fine he just needs more practice. I have him read for 30 minutes each day but that is all he does. (He is working on Harry Potter- I think it is above his level but he really wants to read it- he only gets through one or two pages read every 30 minutes. ) I don’t want to make it an issue by requiring him to read much longer or making him read a book that I choose, but I am not sure he will ever finish the book at this rate.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sandy,
Reading speed and stamina is something built with time. Requiring him to read daily is one of the best ways to help him become better with reading, so keep that up. However, please be aware that can take time. It can be slow to build reading speed and stamina. I think 30 minutes a day is fine; I’d even be inclined to say as little as 20 minutes a day.

Do you have him read aloud to you at all anymore? Continue to have him read aloud to you for a portion of each day’s reading time. That way you can hear if he is guessing at words, struggling to sound words out, or having other difficulties. You don’t have to follow along at this point, just listen. I would have my kids read aloud to me for 10 minutes or so while I started dinner each afternoon when they were in this stage.

However, I agree that Harry Potter sounds to be above his level. He needs to be making more progress through a book than just a couple pages in 30 minutes. Progress is made when books are on a student’s comfortable to just a bit challenging level. Taking 30 minutes to read just two pages is his frustration level.

Consider getting Harry Potter on audiobook so he can finish it and then require him to read books on a lower level for the time being. If he balks, let him know he is always welcome to read harder books on his own time or can listen to them on audiobook, but while he is doing his reading time each day he needs to read books that he can read more easily so that he can improve. It’s like starting a video game on level 1, even though it’s easy. There are things you have to practice on the lower levels before you are ready to tackle the higher ones.

My youngest child was 11 when she finished All About Reading 4. She, too, needed to work on reading speed and stamina but she didn’t mind starting with easier books. In fact, she was very happy to read series like The Boxcar Children one after another. She read books that were on 3rd to 4th-grade level (Lexile level of about 580, guided reading level around O) for about 6 months and then she started picking up higher level books and having success with them. She is 12 and a half now and reading well on grade level for pleasure, but we are now working on her reading more complex material for information, such as her General Science textbook. It’s an ongoing process toward complete success with reading.

I hope this helps but I am happy to work with your further on this, as much as you need. I’d love to hear how things are going after a few weeks of having him read aloud to you for 10 minutes and then read quietly for the rest of the time, all from books, magazines, and such that are more on his level. Please let me know if you have any questions or need anything.

Jaclynn

says:

Love this! We have been doing storytime 3x a week at the library and now we are discussing themes after reading a book. Then we try to have them tell the story based on the picture only. I’m always looking for more resources to encourage reading for my twins before they start preschool.

Ashley Blasy

says:

I appreciate these tips and am looking forward to trying your pre-reading curriculum out! I think it will be a lot of fun for my daughter and I!

Gail

says:

Excellent blog and great motivation to read guide

Laura

says:

This was very helpful for me as I have a 3 year old definitely showing motivation to learn reading.

Anna

says:

Thank you for all your tips! You guys really partner with us parents and help us succeed!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Awww, you are so welcome, Anna!

Becky

says:

These are great, thank you! I have found that my enthusiasm about a book is contagious to my daughters as well.

Steffen Carter

says:

It’s so awesome that you explained all of this out very well. These 10 tips will definitely help the preschoolers to motivated while reading. Thank you for posting such an informative post.

Jeannie

says:

Great tips! Thanks for sharing.

Nicole Shepherd

says:

Wonderful advice! My son is a motivated reader my daughter is much less so. Thanks for the tips.

Dee Schutte

says:

My preschooler loves “reading” her own stories from picture books, as well copying her older siblings. I too love reading, and feel that the only way to love reading is to read what interests you! Need to teach my preschooler to read still, but happy with her interest already.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Dee,
It sounds like your preschooler definitely has “motivation to read” down well! I love that cute stage when they “read” the pictures and tell such unique stories.

Eli

says:

I’ve found that giving my preschool child wordless picture books has actually ENCOURAGED her “reading.” Before she could sound out the words… she gained confidence in “reading” wordless books by herself. She told the story out loud in her own words. But she was sooo proud! I’m embarrassed to admit I never cared for wordless picture books before… and my older child never used them. But my second child struggles with certain sounds & has to really work at her speech. These books were game changers & now she’s confident & excited to learn to read words!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Eli,
I love that wordless pictures books were able to help your child gain so much confidence with being able to tell a story and being ready to learn to read!

Carolyn

says:

This is such an important list for new parents—these suggestions pave the way to engaged early readers!!

Kerry Fritz

says:

Starting prereading soon. Great tips

Kelsey

says:

Great tips, my guy loves to be read to as well as “read” to his brother and I!

Donald Errol Knight

says:

Lots of practical information and downloads!!

Tracey

says:

Great tips! My preschooler is excited to learn to read. We are started Pre Reading soon.

Kelsey

says:

Yes to all of this! Reading with voices might feel silly but the kids LOVE it! And the modelling part it so important. It’s so easy to get caught up in our screens nowadays. I have to remember to let my kids “catch me” reading. We have a 3 month old so I’ve gotten in the habit of reading while I’m nursing instead of using my phone because I want them to know it’s important to me too!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kelsey,
I got SO MUCH reading done each time I had a nursing baby. Sigh. I miss those days (sometimes, I don’t miss being up all night 😉). Enjoy your little one and enjoy your extra reading!

Sharen

says:

Nice article. Thanks for list of books.

Sarah R

says:

Getting my son to read has proven to be more challenging than with my daughter. Until I learned about “All about Reading” program. My son loves the little books. And keeping the lessons short and sweet has definitely made it more fun.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

This is great to hear, Sarah! I’m so happy that All About Reading has helped your son have success with reading. Keep up the great work!

Kallie Meyer

says:

This information in very helpful!

Priyanga

says:

Nice article. Reading has become a daily fun activity for my three year old daughter. Thanks for the wonderful articles on how to improve reading skills.

April

says:

We have books everywhere in our home and I read to my kids everyday (occasionally my husband fills in). I let my kids pick out books to buy at Goodwill, too.

Ginny

says:

I purchased All About Reading level 1 after using a different program without success. My 7 year old’s reading has improved so much this year. He is even becoming more confident in his ability.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m am so pleased to hear this, Ginny! I especially liked reading that his becoming a confident reader. That is important.

Michele Rae Goguen

says:

I’m struggling along with my 7 yr old son. He loves being read to, but cannot seem to grasp reading. He’s mastered alphabet, phonics (mostly, I think!) and he does some online pre-reading skills like a champ (matching words, spelling, etc.). But when it comes to the actual books, he comes to a screeching halt. We had his eyes checked & he now wears glasses. I homeschool him and I am starting to feel like a failure!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Michele,
I am so sorry that your son is struggling with reading. I promise you aren’t a failure! Approximately 34% of students struggle to learn to read and spell. My first two children learned to read easily, but even with that experience, my next three children all struggled for years before having success with it. Some kids just need a different approach.

Have you considered trying All About Reading? It was designed especially to take the struggle out of learning to read. Also, All About Reading has a one-year guarantee. If you purchase it directly from us, you can use it for up to a year and if for any reason you feel that it isn’t the right match for your child, return it for a full refund.

Here are some ways that All About Reading can help kids with learning difficulties:

– Each lesson time is simple and explicit, and will include 3 simple steps: review of what was learned the day before, a simple new teaching, and a short practice of that new teaching.

– Incremental lessons. AAR breaks every teaching down into its most basic steps and then teaches the lessons in a logical order, carrying the students from one concept or skill to the next. Each step builds on the one the student has already mastered.

– AAR is multisensory. Research has shown that when a child is taught through all three pathways at the same time, a method known as simultaneous multisensory instruction, he will learn significantly more than when taught only through his strongest pathway.

– AAR uses specially color-coded letter tiles. Working with the All About Reading letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept.

– AAR is scripted, so you can concentrate on your child. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage.

– AAR has built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning difficulties generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. With AAR, your child will have a Reading Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows.

– AAR has lots of fluency practice. One of the things that Marie, the author, noticed when she was researching reading programs is that few programs have enough review built in for kids who struggle to gain fluency. AAR has fluency sheets or a story to be read with every lesson, so children can practice reading smoothly with expression and confidence.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Andrea

says:

Reading aloud to my young children helps me create a calm in an otherwise chaotic day. It helps me to love them and nurture them and give them 100% of me in addition to helping them to become motivated readers. The library is our happy place!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

So well put, Andrea! So well put. Thank you.

Sherry

says:

Both of my kids love reading! These are great tips.

Tiffany M

says:

Thank you for the thoughtful tips. My kids struggle with reading and I hope to implement some of the ideas that you have given me. Thank you!!

Cesia K

says:

Thank you for these practical tips. I’ll be really working to create our own library with books at my daughter’s reading level!

Clorinda

says:

These are all great ideas to keep little ones interested in books and reading!

Carolina A

says:

Thank you for all the tips! I really appreciate how much I’ve learned from the many articles you have shared for free for successful and enjoying reading with our kids!

Sarah

says:

Hoping to try this!

Sharon carson

says:

My 6 year old is really struggling. This looks great!

Sarah LeBlanc

says:

All About reading has been such a blessing for my kids! Thank you

Suzy

says:

My little guy is 9 and he has autism. He’s been able to read specific content of his choice for a long time, but struggles with communication. When it comes to reading out loud, it has been difficult in the past, but I have learned the more animated I am, the more he is willing to participate. With all the “must reads” for school, I set aside time in the day where he can pick any book he wants, even if it’s below his level. He can choose any place he wants, I even put a blanket over our school table in the house, it has glow-in-the-dark stars under it and I bring a flashlight. We will take turns reading pages, or if there is a line that is repeated at the end of every page or so, he will read each page until that line and I make it as animated as I can for him. Or, there are times I add words to bring excitement to the picture. He loves when things fall or crash, so there are times I add a lot of “oh no’s!”

In terms of duration, setting a timer does not work with him, he just reads slower or allows himself to be distracted longer. If I set a number of pages and it’s clearly marked with a paperclip, he is much more willing to read with fluency.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

What a great teacher you are, Suzy! I especially love the fort you make under your school table. What a fun place to practice reading! Thank you for sharing this.

Amy Starkweather

says:

Wonderful ideas!

Kristen

says:

I’m trying to decide if I need to get the pre-reading program for my 3-year-old who is already “reading” or recognizing and reading correctly several words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kristen,
Take a look at our placement tests for All About Reading, particularly the placement test for level 1. If your child has all the skills in that placement test down, then he or she has already mastered the material from the Pre-reading level. It is very rare for a 3-year-old to be ready to begin All About Reading level 1, but it has happened.

Raeshell Droullard

says:

All About Reading seems to be the best curriculum out there for my little ones. Emergent readers are the most curious. Read and make it fun!

Tracy

says:

These are great tips! My 4 year old loves me reading to her.

Stephanie Sipes

says:

My kids are motivated!

Rachel Nitz

says:

Our kids love the “read-a-picture” story books as a way to begin pre reading skills where they have to follow along with you then read the picture in the sentence. Helps with practicing to read left to right and practice tracking coordination with following the words. My kids LOVE the “Little kids in the Neighborhood”, at Home, at School and at Play…” series of 4 books by Honey Bear Books from Modern Publishing. They’re out of print but you can find on used book websites or garage sales. But they both just love them and they feel like they can relate to the family as all 4 books feature the same family and their friends.

Julia

says:

These tips are great! I love reading to my little man and watching him guess what’s happening next!

Kristen

says:

Thank you for these suggestions.. I have a wiggler(or two!) and appreciate the suggestion to let them play with play dough while I read to them.. I think it will be good to give their wiggles a direction while doing our daily reading.

Michelle

says:

All About Reading and Spelling are amazing programs. They really work and are fun for kids!

Susan

says:

My 5 year old granddaughter is a bit beyond the prereading so I ordered the Level 1 Reading program and it looks like we may need to start about midway in the material. I’m using the beginning lessons for review and evaluation of her progress at this point.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great idea, Susan. Starting at the beginning will help ensure your granddaughter doesn’t have any gaps and will help build her confidence before getting to the parts that are new for her. And since All About Reading is a mastery-based program, you can move through the lessons that are review for her as quickly as she is able and then slow down when you get to new material.

Let me know if you have any questions about moving through the early lessons quickly or anything else.

Sarah Turner

says:

Great read!

Allie G

says:

Great tips

Nina

says:

My four year old loves it when I give the characters different voices.

Amanda Evans

says:

These are wonderfully practical and encouraging tips! Great reminders!

Olivia

says:

When my one of my children showed enthusiasm for a specific book, I began checking for more titles in the series each time I was at a second-hand book store. I found two over the course of a few months, and he remains excited about when we might find another. Although we’ll continue to borrow many books from the library, this small investment in books to keep is so worthwhile for reinforcing interest in reading!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

What a great way to encourage a love of books, Olivia!

julie

says:

Great tips! I will begin teaching my daughter to read in the fall and am really looking forward to it!

Marian McDade

says:

I would add to read a variety of books and when you find one that your chold especially enjoys, be sure to enjoy it more than once. It’s nice to have a collection of “favorites.”

Gail

says:

Great tips to give to my son and any other new parent

Barb

says:

Reading to your child is also the first step for beginning writers. The more your child knows, the more she/he will be willing to share ideas in the future … writing about ideas!

Lauren

says:

Thank you for these helpful tips!

Janette Abeyta

says:

Great tips!

Janette Abeyta

says:

Good tips for reading readiness!

Sarah

says:

Wordless picture books have been a great way for my K and PreK kids to enjoy “reading” something on their own.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sarah,
Yes! We have a blog post full of wordless picture books suggestions too.

Malorie Thompson

says:

We love our library and I feel like it’s definitely enhanced my littles enjoyment for books!

Sofia Panibratets

says:

One of our favorite places to read is on a blanket outside!

These are great tips for creating an environment for a love of books. I am forever grateful my mother did this for me, and I’m trying to do the same for my little ones!

Rhonda

says:

Great information!

Lacey

says:

Thank you so much for all the information you share to set us and our children up for success.

Laura

says:

Thanks for the tips!

Susan

says:

Great ideas!

whitney

says:

Fascinating, and so helpful, thank you!

Edith teemant

says:

Thanks…

Jennifer

says:

These work! I’ve got two avid readers—one who didn’t really get traction until about 10. Don’t pressure. Keep doing fun read-alouds. Don’t force them to read “good” books on their own. If they find something they’re excited to read, encourage them. They’ll come to value quality writing, especially if you read good books to them with enthusiasm. And listening to audiobooks in the car is a great way to supplement read aloud time at home and stoke the spark of love for stories.

Sabrina Done

says:

Thanks for the tips!

J Locke

says:

Love the tips! My oldest was an eager and early reader but my next has been incredibly reluctant and though he LOVES read alouds (and even enjoys handwriting and phonics lessons), he hates to sit down with his own readers and try it himself. Any tips on motivating those who are reading well – sentences even- on phonics worksheets but the moment a book is opened they want to quit and get so nervous they can’t sound out the same words they were reading in phonics practice?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Interesting. Try taking the words and some of the harder sentences from the story and typing them up on a worksheet (using Word or Google Docs) for him to practice on before he even looks at the story. Then, the next day when you go to read the story, let him know that he has already read all the words and some of the sentences on the worksheet he did yesterday so everything will be easy for him.

All About Reading does this with “Warm Up” pages before each story, so you don’t need to make your own if you are using AAR. In this way, students are set up for the utmost success when it comes time to read the story. Being able to read the story with ease builds confidence, which then makes them all the more ready to have success with the next one.

However, there is a chance it could be something else. If his phonics worksheets use a different font and especially if they use larger letters, it may be that he is truly having trouble with the story. Some fonts and smaller writing can be difficult for early readers, or it may be that he has a vision problem that makes the book you are using more difficult.

Let me know how it goes. I’m interested in hearing if using words and sentences from the story on a worksheet the day before helps.

Paige

says:

I appreciate the encouragement to let them wiggle! With two boys, I often wonder if it’s okay to let them move around while we are reading aloud.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Definitely okay to wiggle, Paige! I still read aloud to my teens and they always have some sort of project or something going on while I read aloud. Busy hands help their ears to focus. 😉

Alana Rimby

says:

What great ideas!

Mary Katherine

says:

This is great! We just started the pre-reading program! My daughter has started writing her own books by writing words she knows and illustrating, then taping the pages together. She gets so excited to read me her new story each time! She is definitely motivated to read!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

How cute, Mary Katherine! When my daughter was little, she “wrote” stories in composition books. I always buy a stack of them when they go on sale in the summer before school starts up and she would happily fill the pages with her attractive scribbles that she said was writing. But she could “read” me the stories without a problem. Makes me nostalgic. 😊

Amber

says:

My 6 year old isn’t truly motivated yet, still working on it!

Adri

says:

Great ideas!! My 5 year old is starting to have interest in reading.
I also have a 7 year old struggling. The giveaway will be a great way to help him with better materials.

Kilah

says:

We love the library!

Dawn

says:

I take my 4 yr old to the library often, she loves to pick out her own books. Then I choose a few that go along with the seasons or an upcoming holiday and find some free interactive stuff we can do to go along with the books. Thanks for the giveaway I would love to win this to help teach my daughter reading.

Rachel Perkins

says:

My 5 yr old is loving the pre reading curriculum and she shows all the signs of reading motivation!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

That’s great, Rachel! Keep up the excellent work. 😊

Angie Nunnelee

says:

I would love to win this giveaway! My grandson is in Kindergarten and I am helping him learn to read! I want him to love books as much as I do. Thanks for the giveaway. :)

Hannah C.

says:

This is very helpful! My 3year old shows all of these signs so I guess she’s ready for the pre level!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Hannah,
Take a look at our placement tests for All About Reading to see if your little one is ready to begin. Many 3-year-olds are ready to begin our Pre-reading level. Let me know if you have questions.

Paul

says:

Wow, I am so jealous! I live in Indonesia and, along with my wife, have decided to homeschool my child. He is now seven years of age. He is not capable of reading words over three letters long. He is reasonable in math problems and is very good at identifying patterns.

He does not mind being read to but does not initiate this. Comments?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Paul,
Reading three letter words at 7 years of age is a good place to be at. From there, teach him how to sound out words with blends, such as st, br, cl, and so on, and he’ll be able to read 4 and 5 letter words with ease as well. Then you teach him to divide words into syllables and then read each syllable separately, and he’ll be reading words with lots more letters.

All About Reading covers each of these things and much, much more in explicit, step-by-step detail. You may consider beginning your child in it to help expand his reading.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Seka

says:

Thanks for the tips!

Tina Price

says:

Thanks for the tips & encouragement ! My son is 4 and is interested in letters but can’t sit or listen long enough to get very far !

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tina,
First, keep lesson time with such a very young child very short. Aim for just 10 minutes. Second, you don’t have to sit to learn about letters. Stand up and use a pointer to point to each letter on an alphabet chart as you sing the ABC song. Show him the letter A and have him write the letter A in the air. Tape letters to the wall and throw snowballs (wadded up scrap paper) at them as you say their names. There are lots and lots of ways for letter learning to be very active!

Are you using our Pre-reading level? This level has lots of ideas for active and fun ways to learn letters, phonological awareness, and other reading readiness skills.

Amanda

says:

Any tips on how to motivate a child who loves books and story time but doesn’t like to stop playing for a reading lesson? When I do get him to do a reading lesson he does great!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amanda,
The best tip I have is consistency. When you do a short (use a timer!) lesson at the same time every day, it becomes “normal” for the child like brushing their teeth or sitting down for breakfast. When I say “same time”, I don’t necessarily mean by the clock but rather that it always happens after something else you do every day. So maybe you could do reading time after you finish breakfast and clean up every Monday through Friday. Or maybe after lunch. Find the time of day that your child is most alert and willing, and make that reading lesson time. Then do it five days a week and before long you’ll find a lot less resistance.

Jamie

says:

Maybe the easiest way to foster a love for reading is to cut out screens for little ones. We don’t have a tv in our living area and my little boys pore over books. My other tip is invest in a home library by using Thriftbooks, Abebooks or Amazon used so you can pick books that are going to feed their little minds and hearts and make you (less) crazy when they ask to read it for the 10th time that day.

Tarah Tugman

says:

My daughter loves to pretend to read us books. We will be starting the Pre-Reading curriculum this fall. I can’t wait. :)

Kayla Adkins

says:

My kids are always pretending to read and they love read aloud time. Can’t wait to try out All About Reading so they no longer have to pretend.

Robyn

says:

My 3 year old daughter had been loving the pre-reading curriculum! Every time we do a lesson she asks if ‘Zig Zebra is coming to play’. She is so eager to read and write!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Awww! How sweet that she loves Ziggy the Zebra, Robyn! 😊

Melissa

says:

All three of my kids are readers already and it’s because we did a lot of these things starting when they were very young.

Nicole

says:

My child does love to be read to and she also LOVES to narrate the whole story back to me afterward or “read” it back to herself basically retelling the whole story. A great skill! I can’t wait until she can start sounding out words!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

That’s so great, Nicole. It sounds like she definitely loves books!

Misty

says:

My 10 month old already loves to listen to stories. Her favorite is Goodnight Moon. At what age can I start the yellow level with her?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great question, Misty. Here is a checklist to help you decide when your child is ready to begin the Pre-reading level. Let me know if you have any questions.

Paoniasal

says:

Letter knowledge is so important. Researcher did not always think so but now they say that a child that can name all the letters of the alphabet are much more likely to be successful readers. I love AAR’s letter recognition activities!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Paoniasal,
Yes. Learning letters and letter names as well as sounds is very important for reading success. That is why we have so many activities for letter learning.

Paula

says:

This is motivation for me too ⭐️

Linsey Dipprey

says:

I love reading so much so I want my kids to as well!

Jessica

says:

Great ideas!

Rebekah Ash

says:

I can’t wait to try some of the idea

Anita

says:

Awesome ideas

Amy Davis

says:

My son loved to be read to so we tested him for readiness last fall and started the pre reading program. We just finished the first reader provided on level 1, and my son is thrilled to be reading

Amy Davis

says:

My son loved to be read to so we tested him for readiness last fall and started the pre reading program. We just finished the first reader provided on level 1, and my son is thrilled to be reading. I’m thrilled to see him progressing and enjoying it too

Nayi

says:

Love your blog. Very helpful. Love this curriculum

Stephanie

says:

This was a particularly meaningful post for me, as my pre-schooler is showing many signs of motivation to read. Your insight gives me comfort, as well as a timely reminder to move forward with some of the other reading readiness skills. I look forward to your insight on all of the big five skills. Thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Stephanie, and I’m glad this was helpful for you. You can find an overview of all five reading readiness skills including links to blog posts with additional information in our article Reading Readiness: The Top 5 Skills.

Holly

says:

This is great! Reading in front of them and to them makes such an impression!

Becky B.

says:

This is a great list! I think it’s important to read books on subjects that your children are currently interested in. My 4-year-old daughter is obsessed with pink. We checked out a book called “I Love Pink” at the library and she loved it so much she memorized it word for word, so we bought a copy for her!

Erika

says:

My son loves animals. He loves animal books. He definitely loves to have them read to him repeatedly.

We love taking advantage of the weather and reading outside with a blanket, some lemonade, and snacks. It makes our reading time so much more special.

Andrea

says:

This is so encouraging! My 5 year old loves to write so I made her a little booklet to write her poems down just today! She’s been writing all day!

Jenny Buie

says:

Loved this post. My husband and I are avid readers, so from the time our son was born we were reading to him and creating a home library filled with the classics. We’re also blessed with a phenomenal library that has three library story times a week that we’ve been going to since our son was 6 months old, and he loves it. Next year when he turns 5 and can get his own library card, he will be in heaven.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Getting their own library card is a great event in a child’s life! I recommend photos of the big event. 😊

K. Metcalf

says:

Our perspectives may change as we get older but I haven’t met many who don’t enjoy hearing a book read aloud.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Yes, most do enjoy listening to a good book!

Sarah

says:

I liked reading the motivation to read article and how it gave examples for this. My favorite one was the family Hedbandz game.

Virginia

says:

This is helpful in gushing my children’s readiness. Thank you, we love all about reading!

Tara

says:

Great information! Thank you!

Jan Wilkerson

says:

Can’t wait to get started with the program and working with my 10 year old grandson.

Sarah

says:

My daughter can read (a small list of words)- if it’s a story, but refuses word lists or flash cards. Trying to motivate her to work on more words is a challenge.

Melanie

says:

I love this! I’ve only recently learned about you, but the more I see, the more I love! Thank you for what you’re doing for literacy!!!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Melanie! Let me know if you have any questions or need more information.

Kelly

says:

Great tips! Thanks!

Katie

says:

My son enjoys being read to and even enjoys some letter writing and writing a few words (on his own terms). If I try to do any formal or structured reading lessons he refuses completely. He somewhat listens and sometimes follows along when I do All About Spelling with his older sister. I am hoping he will like the All About Reading program.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You don’t mention how old your child is, Katie. But it’s not unusual for little ones to resist being taught to do the things they are playing with. It’s like a toddler wanting to build his block tower himself and not have someone help him. If he is very young, I wouldn’t worry about it, but if he is about 5 or so you could start the Pre-reading level. Doing something for a short time most every day often helps the activity to be more acceptable.

Let me know if you have questions or need help with anything.

Katie

says:

Thank you. He is 5. I will give the Pre-readinglevel a try. I worry about forcing the kids to do something and then making them hate it.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I think you will find he will enjoy it, Katie! It’s designed to teach through play.

Jennifer Reyes

says:

I love all the tips and printable learning games!

Katie

says:

Great tips!!

Mary

says:

These are great tips!

Mandi

says:

We are just about to start learning to read with my 5 year old. I look forward to using this program.

BC_Ang

says:

I love these tips. Thank you.

Jenny

says:

This is all so encouraging and helpful!

Kayla W

says:

We love reading aloud as a family! We will be starting our 4th child with AAR in the next few weeks!

Tanya Rodriques

says:

So helpful! Thank you!

Lindsay

says:

My youngest is 2 and already showing many of these signs. I’m hoping she’s going to catch on without the difficulties her older brother struggles with.

Tiffany

says:

Love the suggestion to let little wrigglers wiggle during read-aloud time!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tiffany,
Yes! I have a few kids that I would never have been able to read aloud to if I didn’t allow them their wiggles. I read to kids standing on their heads, in a fort under the dining room table, and taking apart a bicycle. As long as they are quiet, I pretty much let them do whatever they want while I read aloud.

Annie Overman

says:

Great tips!!

Juliana

says:

Great info! Thanks

Sarah

says:

Love the ideas!

Jen

says:

Great information – very helpful!

Nichole

says:

Thanks so much for this blog. I actually have a preschooler now who is showing signs of interest in learning more. She has blossomed since Christmas learning her letter sounds. I’m saving up for the pre-reading level.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Nichole. It’s so wonderful to watch your little become interested in learning!

Hillary

says:

This program takes out so much of the guess work when teaching them. Not only am I learning more but I’ve also taught my mom. 😁

Angelita Gonzalez

says:

Wonderful information thank you

Ania Welin

says:

I am so happy we discover AAR! Zaida is soaring!! I love the color readers and activity books so much!

Camila

says:

Children have their own favorite colors. I include their colors in the story. That catches their attention.

Lia

says:

Great tips, thanks!

Sara M

says:

Great ideas! Thank you

Brittany

says:

Love this!

Wonderful information. Thank you

Anna

says:

Thank you for all the advice! Motivation is the key!

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