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Signs of a Reading Problem

child with reading problem

Do you suspect that your child has a reading problem? If so, you’re not alone.

Lots of parents come to us looking for answers to their children’s reading problems. My own son had struggles with reading when he was young, so not only do I have the help you need, I also understand firsthand what you’re going through.

Let’s get some answers for you!

As you read through this article, trust your instincts. If you think your child is struggling with reading, it is likely that he is. This list can help you be sure.

What Are the Signs of a Reading Problem?

A child with a reading problem may display some of the issues listed below.

  • Sounds out every word on the page, even if he has already read them. Reading-Problems-Blog-House-Vs-Horse-300x300
  • Doesn’t know the sounds of the letters.
  • Oral reading is choppy rather than fluent and smooth.
  • Reads words in the wrong order.
  • May recognize a word on one page, but not on the next page.
  • Substitutes similar-looking words, such as house for horse.
  • Guesses at words instead of sounding them out.
  • Lacks the skill to sound out unfamiliar words.
  • Ignores punctuation when reading.
  • Loses place on the page, skips lines, or rereads lines.
  • Inserts extra letters in a word when reading. For example, may read tail as trail. The misread word often has the same beginning and ending letter.
  • Makes up part of the story based on the illustrations or context clues instead of reading the actual words on the page.
  • Substitutes words with similar meanings when reading stories. For example, may read said instead of shouted.
  • Skips small words such as a, the, to, of, were, and from.
  • Displays poor reading comprehension.
  • Has a difficult time reading single words on a flashcard.
  • Resists reading. It’s a natural tendency for children to avoid what they aren’t skilled at.
Signs of a reading problem quick guide graphic

What Causes Reading Problems?

If you recognize your child in any of the signs listed above, don’t despair! Reading problems can stem from a number of different causes, and most of these can be overcome.

Kids with auditory processing disorder often have problems learning to read. Though a child with APD faces many academic challenges, you can help him learn to read. All About Reading uses an instructional approach that is exactly what a child with APD needs!

Reading-Problems-Blog-Confused-Girl-Chalkboard-300x300

Dyslexia is a common reading and spelling disability. Approximately 10% of students are affected by dyslexia. Symptoms vary from person to person. If you suspect dyslexia, download our Symptoms of Dyslexia checklist.

Vision problems can cause reading issues. Work with your pediatric ophthalmologist to rule out vision problems such as far-sightedness or convergence insufficiency disorder.

Other causes of reading problems include autism and poor working memory. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can also cause reading problems because it is difficult for the child to stay focused on the task at hand.

Is It Possible that My Child Doesn’t Have a Reading Problem?

Signs of a Reading Problem - from All About Reading

Yes, it is! Sometimes a child is labeled with a reading problem, but the real issue is that he hasn’t been taught in the way he can learn. We can’t expect a child to read if he has gaps in his reading instruction or limited experience. While some kids seem to naturally pick up reading with very little instruction, for many kids, reading success requires direct systematic instruction such as that found in All About Reading.

Other times, too much is expected from very young children. Some children just aren’t ready to read yet, and in those cases, it’s helpful to do pre-reading activities to prepare them, such as those found in our Pre-reading program.

Learning to read takes time—and in many cases, repetition and review—before a child begins to experience success. A child might need to see a word 30 times before he can automatically recognize it by sight. If your child hasn’t met a word that many times yet, don’t be alarmed if he needs to sound it out. 

Learning to read can be hard work for kids. If your child has a low frustration tolerance, it can appear that he may have a reading problem even if he doesn’t.

How Can I Help My Child?

If your child has a reading problem, the most important thing to remember is that you CAN help him. And we can help you! The resources below are all designed to provide parents with the tools they need to teach their children to read and spell, even children with special needs.

Resources for Children with Reading Problems

All About Reading is a fun and engaging program that starts with essential pre-reading skills and continues on to teach all five key components of reading. This Orton-Gillingham program contains everything your student needs to become a fluent reader for life!

The Power of the Orton-Gillingham Approach: Discover the foundational elements of this powerful approach and how it forms the backbone of the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs.

10 Tips for Reaching Your Struggling Learner: There are very specific teaching methods that you can use to help your struggling learner succeed. One of the most important things you will want to do is to use curricula and teaching strategies that can be tailored to his needs.

How to Solve Letter Reversal Problems: Does your child sometimes confuse certain letters, like b and d or n and u? Beginning readers and dyslexic children may struggle to differentiate between letters that have similar shapes, and issues with letter reversals can have a direct impact on reading, writing, and spelling.

Learning Ally is a non-profit organization committed to helping dyslexic, blind, and visually impaired students thrive. Audiobooks help kids experience the many benefits of consuming text, but without the struggle of reading.

Testimonies from Real Moms

Failure Is Not an Option: In this video, author Marie Rippel shares with you the very personal story of how she came to develop the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs.

All About Reading and Dyslexia: Trained Orton-Gillingham instructor and mom Marianne tells her story of teaching seven children with dyslexia.

How All About Spelling Saved My Dyslexic Son: Heather began homeschooling her dyslexic son after exhausting all other options. That’s when she discovered All About Spelling. This blog post shares how her son’s learning was transformed with AAS.

Contact Us If You Need Help

If you have questions about how to help your struggling reader, please feel free to call or email us.

Does your child show signs of a reading problem?

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Sharon Nell

says:

My 7 year old is struggling with reading

Nneka

says:

My son is seven and he has difficulty in reading

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your child is struggling, Nneka. I hope you find the tips in this blog article helpful.

You may find these articles helpful as well:
Helping Kids Sound Out Words
How to Teach Phonograms
The “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling

Please let me know if you have questions about specific concerns or difficulties.

Monica Velasquez

says:

My child is11 years old and is struggling to read, he read one day and the next he forgets some words.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your child is struggling, Monica. However, it is common for struggling learners to read a word one day and not know it the next day. In fact, such children will often read a word and then not know the same word just a few minutes later in another sentence.

Often older students like your child struggle because they are missing foundational concepts and skills necessary for success in reading. It is very important to ensure that a student’s foundation has no gaps. We offer A “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling to do this.

Elizabeth M Jenkins

says:

I am wanting to sign my child up. She was recently diagnosed ADHD. Her specific area was inattentive. She also goes to eye therapy for convergence issues.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Do you have any questions or need help with anything, Elizabeth?

We are a curriculum publisher, so there is nothing to sign a child up for with us. All About Reading and All About Spelling are multisensory programs that approach learning through sight, sound, and touch. They are easy to teach without special training or previous experience. The programs are mastery-based rather than grade-level-based, so you can choose the level that fits your student’s needs and customize the review and pace.

Mary

says:

Pls my child is 6+ she’s in grad 2 going to 3 in September, pls she needs help in Reading and writing.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your child is struggling, Mary. I hope you find the tips in this blog article helpful.

You may find these articles helpful as well:
Helping Kids Sound Out Words
How to Teach Phonograms
Break the “Word Guessing” Habit
The “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling

Please let me know if you have questions about specific concerns or difficulties.

Michael

says:

Very helpful

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m glad this was helpful for you, Michael. If you have any questions or concerns, please let us know. We are happy to help if we can!

Catherine mokoena

says:

Hey my son is struggling to read, write and he is in grade 4 ,I don’t know how to help him or teach him ,he is 9 years.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Catherine,
I am sorry to hear your son is struggling with reading. Check out this articles as they may be helpful:
10 Tips for Reaching Your Struggling Learner
The “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling
Reading Readiness: The Top 5 Skills
How to Teach Phonograms
Helping Kids Sound Out Words

If you have specific questions or concerns I could address, I am happy to help.

Precious

says:

My child needs help for reading and writing

Cynthia

says:

Please my child needs help

Chaitra

says:

My student is not able to read and not able to keep memory any words he is 13 years boy how to help him

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Chaitra,
I’m sorry your student is struggling so much with reading! I hope some of the above articles can help and give you some insight into his struggles. If you want to talk more in depth or hear more about how AAR might be able to help, please feel free to email me at [email protected].

Nadia Blair

says:

My daughter struggles Reading

Nadia Blair

says:

My daughter is 9 year
Shruggles Reading

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your daughter is struggling, Nadia. I hope this blog post is helpful. You may find our 10 Tips for Reaching Your Struggling Learner blog post and The “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling article helpful as well.

Please let me know if you have specific concerns or questions.

Crystal Mercado

says:

My 7 year old son reads (small words) well some days and not others. How do I know if there’s an issue vs just not ready or just tired?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Crystal,
You may be able to tell by how often your son has trouble. If you work on reading at around the same time each day and do it consistently four or five days a week, then you would expect problems with reading to only show up when there is an obvious explanation (like he is sick) or maybe on the first day of the week. If you are working consistently at more or less the same time daily, I would expect how he does to be more or less the same or from day to day. (He will be improving but as you move forward in lessons it gets more difficult, so it will feel like he is doing more or less the same.)

I hope this helps some, but please let me know if you have questions or need more help. I’m happy to aid you as much as you need!

Fawzia

says:

My son is 10 and still sounds words

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Fawzia,
I think you may find our How to Develop Reading Fluency article helpful to transition your son from sounding out words to reading smoothly.

The biggest need for developing smooth, fluent reading is to practice reading every day.

Thembakazi

says:

Need help she can right but not read them but she speel them correct when righting them

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your child is having this difficulty, Thembakazi. I hope you find the suggestions in this blog post and in our 10 Tips for Reaching Your Struggling Learner blog post helpful.

Check out our Helping Kids Sound Out Words article. I think it may help.

JoAnn

says:

Please send me information on how I can assist my grandchild with his reading

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

JoAnn,
Often a child struggles with reading because they are missing the foundational skills and knowledge necessary for reading success. Our “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling can address this.

Here are some blog posts that include activities to help students with reading:
How to Teach Phonograms
Helping Kids Sound Out Words
Break the “Word Guessing” Habit
Reading Readiness: The Top 5 Skills

You may also found our 10 Tips for Reaching Your Struggling Learner article helpful as well.

Thuli

says:

Hi, I have my casiens Child he was doing grade 4 last year he pass to grade 5,but the is something missing he can’t read, and write my problem how come he alway pass, the is something wrong pls advice

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your child is having such difficulties, Thuli. Have you seen our 10 Tips for Reaching Your Struggling Learner blog post? It may be helpful.

Les

says:

I have a learning disability I’m sixty eight years old and had to pretty much teach myself ! I have 4 grown children 3 out of the 4 were diagnosed with ADHD and one with a learning disability. thanks to my husband who paid for all their tutors they are doing well one has her own design company my son is a salesman doing great and my third daughter with a learning disability is a social worker at a school ! I have ten grandchildren! 2 so far with learning problems.one is going to be ok there parents have money! the social workers little girl is the one I worry about she is going to be 6 and doesn’t know her letters and her colors! I told my daughter two years ago that I think she has a problem but her teachers then and now say kids learn at there own pace. my Granddaughter came home crying that she is not smart! my kids took Orton Gillingham classes for years but that is reading what can we do now ? we have the letter factor go fish cards in the alphabet and colors cards is there anything else? I’m not sure she can afford Orton Gillingham classes it’s over $100 dollars a class where we and she lives .if there is any material out there that you could recommend we would be grateful thanks, Les

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Les,
I’m so sorry your grandchild is struggling! I agree it is time to do something to help her as her self-esteem is being affected. Her mother can request assessments be done even despite the teachers’ feeling of “everyone learns at their own pace”.

All About Reading and All About Spelling are based on the Orton-Gillingham approach and are designed to be easy to teach at home with no prior training or experience.

Marie Rippel, author and creator of the programs, is a member of the International Dyslexia Association and has instructed graduate-level courses in Orton-Gillingham Literacy Training offered through Nicolet College in Rhinelander, Wisconsin. She has previously served on the Board of Directors of the Literacy Task Force in Wisconsin and tutored students for more than 20 years. Marie’s son is severely dyslexic, and being told by experts that he would never learn to read led directly to her creating All About Reading and All About Spelling. You can see a short video about her son’s story, Failure is Not an Option.

As for learning colors, first are you sure she is not color blind? While more rare with females, it can happen. There are online color blind tests available that are quick and easy to do at home.

Assuming she is not color blind, then the difficulty probably lies with trouble remembering which name belongs to which color. You can help her master colors by working with her in ways that help her memory rather than stress it. We have a free Help Your Child’s Memory ebook that I think you will find helpful.

First, respect her funnel (the funnel concept of memory is covered in the ebook) by working on just one color until it is mastered. Pick one color, say green, and work on it every day. Show green flashcards, make a collage of green things, have lunches or snacks of only green foods, go on “green walks” pointing out every green object, wear green shirts, and otherwise saturate her with green and the concept of green. Several times a day point to a green object and ask her what color it is.

After a couple of days of exploring green, ask her what green feels like. Whatever she replies, help her to make a green square of that texture/feeling. It doesn’t have to make sense to you; just to her. Maybe green is smooth like a leaf, or bumpy like a frog, or feels like grass, or whatever. Help her to make a tactile sheet that feels like green in her mind as well as being the green color. This, along with exploring green in conversation and with clothing, food, neighborhood walks, and such, is the making connections and SMI portions of the memory ebook.

Once you have spent at least a few days on green and she has mastered it (can easily say “green” when asked what color a green object is and can point to a green object when asked to point to something green), then introduce the next color. Choose a color that is quite different than green (orange or purple would be good), and work on it for a week, give or take, as you did green.

However, you must also continue to review the concept of green at least a few times a day even as she is learning the new color. This is the “making learning stick” point in the ebook. Keep the green collage and the green tactile sheet you together made displayed prominently even as you make a collage and tactile sheet for orange (or purple or whatever). Then, when you move on to the third color, you will review the first two colors daily as well.

Work through red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, black, white, brown, and gray (in whatever order interests your grandchild). Once those are mastered, you can start expanding into more complex colors like cream, teal, lavender, and so on. Honestly, learning colors never really ends! I was in my thirties before I learned that cyan is a very specific shade that is really neither blue nor green but somehow between. It can be very fun to learn a new color every week or month continuously, plus it’s a great vocabulary-building exercise! Learning where the name “olive” for a particular shade of green came from leads to learning about olive trees which could lead, if you are interested, into Mediterranean geography studies.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have additional questions or need more help or suggestions. I’m happy to help as much as you and her mother need!

Concerned Mother

says:

I need help. Both of my children have had the same reading teacher in school , in first grade. I MYSELF had the same reading teacher when I was there in first grade. They have both struggled once they got to first grade and I seriously don’t think its them with the issue. If we go a week without studying much at home, they fail. But if we study every night , they pass. It seems to me like this teacher is just not teaching them in school. I feel like I am having to teach them at home. They don’t struggle in any other subject. they have other teachers for all their other subjects.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your children are struggling! I can maybe offer tips and suggestions for your teaching if you have specific concerns or questions. Let me know.

I do recommend you address your concerns with your children’s school.

Mary Bedel

says:

I have noticed SO MUCH improvement with my daughter through this program. Over summer break, she lost a lot of her fluency skills, but didn’t forget how to decode, which has eliminated a huge portion of her frustration. Thank you for creating this program and making it beautiful, effective, and engaging. We’re very grateful!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great to hear, Mary. Many children lose some skills over long breaks, but it’s wonderful your daughter retained her decoding skills!

Mary Bedel

says:

In the future, I hope to not have such a typical summer break. Is that what will stop the setbacks? Is there a typical time period that you shouldn’t go over, say, no more than two weeks off at a time?

Thanks!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great question, Mary.

It really depends on the child. A couple of my own kids needed about one day’s worth of reviewing for every week or two they were off school, but a couple of my other kids could go a month without forgetting a thing. And some forget more in some subjects than others (one of my kids needs a bit of reviewing every Monday for Algebra).

One way to enjoy a long summer break but still minimize any forgetting is to include activities during your break that use the skills. We discuss this in our How to Beat the Summer Slide blog post.

Another option that many do is to plan to do a bit of school two or three days a week throughout the break. Even just 30 minutes of school (split into reviewing reading, spelling, and math) can help a child to retain everything from the previous school year.

When I take a long break, I plan to spend a day reviewing for every week we took off. Reviewing when we restart allows for a gentle beginning that helps us get back into the swing of things anyway. Sometimes, for some children, they may need more or less review, but a day for every week off has been a good starting place for us.

Bianca Adlem

says:

My son is 11 and he cant read or spell we do homeschool but somedays its a struggle please help me

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your son is having such difficulties, Bianca.

Often older students like your son struggle because they are missing foundational knowledge and skills that are necessary for reading and spelling success. We offer a “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling.

Please let me know if you have specific concerns I may be able to help with.

Asiedu Joseph

says:

Hi Marrie,

Thanks for sharing this rather informative guide.

I am shocked to know that “Approximately 10% of students are affected by dyslexia”.

That is very alarming.

Meaning 1 in every 10 children.

Anyway, thanks for sharing the resources.

I will dig deeper into the “Orton-Gillingham Approach”.

Once again, thanks for the guide.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Asiedu. Yes, it can be very surprising to learn how common specific learning disabilities are.

Viya

says:

May recognize a word on one page, but not on the next page.
Substitutes similar-looking words, such as house for horse.

My child has these problems…

Thembi

says:

Thanks guys .but I’m woride . At school they anly tels me that she won’t write or read but she sleeps that want to send her to the school for the skitso .even if I try she won’t consintreit I wish I could take her somewhere. She is 10years

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

It is understandable to be worried, Thembi. I hope you can find help for her where you are at. Have you spoken with a doctor about it?

Sharon Nell

says:

My 6 year old seems to show no interest in reading sometimes he reads the sentences he gets from school and then I point at words then he does not no them any suggestion

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sharon,
It sounds like your child has not developed any skills for decoding or Sounding Out Words. When students have learned Phonograms and the sounds letters can make, they can learn to sound out the vast majority of words. If you help him learn to sound out words, instead of just memorizing them and knowing them on sight, he may do better.

I hope this helps some.

Lauren S

says:

At what point will my son stop sounding out every single word on the page and actually remember the words? We’re on Lesson 11 of All about Reading 1 (which we just started because I could see in our old program him doing this exact same thing and getting frustrated)… he is enjoying this program much more and not getting frustrated, but I am wondering at what point he will actually remember the words! He only has 2 or 3 “mastered” words and EVERY other word on the flash cards must be sounded out every time. My daughter (2 years younger and just starting Kindergarten this upcoming year) hasn’t even began a reading program, but recognizes words before he does sometimes from just sitting with me while we do his lessons.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lauren,
What you described is very common for many new readers! Reaching the goal of fluent reading will be a gradual process over many lessons. Some kids really need a lot of extra practice in the decoding stage, so spend as much time as needed and try not to worry if your student isn’t reading fluently just yet.

The important thing at this point is that he can sound out the words without difficulty or help. Here’s an article with more information on Helping Kids Sound Out Words that also explains the blending procedure and challenges that students face with learning this new skill.

Students may need to read a word thirty times or more before reading it fluently without sounding it out! So, just know that some beginning readers do need a lot of practice and review. Here’s an article on How to Develop Reading Fluency that can help you understand the overall scope of achieving fluency.

Here are some ideas that can help build fluency:

The Change-the-Word activities are especially helpful for working on blending and paying attention to ALL sounds in a word. Change one letter at a time, starting with simple 3-sound words like: bat-sat-sit-sip-tip-top…and so on. You can do this activity for a couple of minutes each day and not just when scheduled in the Teacher’s Manual. It is also really helpful for working on consonant blends when you get to those lessons (lessons 24-27).

The Word Cards allow you to track what has been mastered and what still needs work. Keep word cards in daily review until your student can read them easily without sounding them out. Here are some fun review ideas for word cards. The word cards will stack up as you go, so just rotate through a portion for 2-3 minutes each day and then pick up in the book wherever you left off previously. And here’s a fun little video explaining what to do when the cards stack up.

The fluency practice pages can be re-used as well. You might enjoy our 16 Ways to Make Practice Sheets Fun. (And check out the comments as well–lots of fun suggestions in there!)

Students who struggle with fluency will also benefit from rereading the same story two or three days in a row to gain fluency and confidence. Buddy Reading can be very powerful in helping students who are in this stage of struggling with fluency.

Rereading the stories will help accomplish these goals:

– Increase word rate
– Improve prosody. Prosody is “expressive reading.” It involves phrasing (grouping words into meaningful phrases), emphasis, and intonation (raising pitch at the end of questions, lowering pitch at the end of sentences)
– Improve automaticity (be able to recognize most words automatically without having to sound them out each time)

Here’s more help with Overcoming Obstacles when Reading AAR Stories.

You can also do a variation of buddy reading called “echo reading.” You read a few sentences with full expression, and then your child reads the same sentences, matching your expression as close as possible. Do this for three to five minutes a day, or whatever is a comfortable length of time for your child. Add in lots of praise when your child shows even a bit of improvement.

The “Fun with Emojis” article gives an enjoyable way to work on reading with expression too. This can be a great way to make reading fun that also sneaks in some extra practice from the fluency pages or readers. Check out Reading with Expression for this activity and others.

This should hopefully give you many ideas for helping him start to develop fluent reading, but overall it is normal for a child in the first quarter of All About Reading level 1 to still need to sound out most words.

JENNIE GRONNIGER

says:

9 years old and reading at2nd grade level

Hilary Harris

says:

My grandson in year 9 has just been diagnosed with dyslexia and dysgraphia and it is difficult to find engaging material to help. As a retired music teacher I am passionate about realising the full potential of each child and do feel that the system has let him down.
My grandson fits the profile of a 2E child who appears very intelligent but is very behind in school.
If I could only get him through the reading and writing and interpretation problems I am sure he would excel. Please advise many thanks

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Hilary,
I am so sorry this was missed until now.

Both All About Reading and All About Spelling are Orton-Gillingham based. This is a proven approach for helping students with dyslexia, dysgraphia, and other learning disabilities. Marie Rippel, author and creator of the programs, is a member of the International Dyslexia Association and has instructed graduate-level courses in Orton-Gillingham Literacy Training offered through Nicolet College in Rhinelander, Wisconsin. She has previously served on the Board of Directors of the Literacy Task Force in Wisconsin and tutored students for more than 20 years. Marie’s son is severely dyslexic, and being told by experts that he would never learn to read led directly to her creating All About Reading and All About Spelling. You can see a short video about her son’s story, Failure is Not an Option.

Here are some ways that AAR and AAS can help kids with dyslexia and other learning disabilities:

–AAR and AAS are explicit and tell students exactly what they need to know to read or spell. We don’t make them guess. The lessons are laid out in an orderly form for the teacher too so that each day you can simply open and go. The programs are easy to do at home without special training or previous experience.

-The programs are incremental and mastery-based. They provide the structure, organization, and clear guidance that kids who struggle need to learn. Our sequence was very carefully tested to reduce confusion for the child. A student will master one concept at a time before adding in others.

– AAR and AAS are multisensory. They approach learning through sight, sound, and touch. This helps kids who struggle with memory issues because they take in information in various ways and interact with it in various ways.

– They use specially color-coded letter tiles or Letter Tile app. Working with the letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept.

– AAS and AAR are scripted, so you can concentrate on your student. The script is very clear, without excess verbiage. Marie also spent a lot of time researching how to word the rules. Our rules are worded so they are as easy for children to remember as possible.

– Both have built-in review in every lesson. Children with learning disabilities generally need lots of review to retain concepts. After a concept has been taught, don’t assume that the child knows it. Quickly revisit that concept again in the next lesson. With AAR and AAS, your child will have a Review Box so you can customize the review. This way, you can concentrate on just the things your child needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your child already knows. Customized review is important because you want every minute of your lesson to count.

Marie noticed when she was researching reading programs that few programs have enough review built in for kids who struggle to gain fluency, which is why AAR includes lots of reading practice with every lesson.

– AAS includes dictation that starts out very short. Level 1 starts out with just words and then progresses to 2-word phrases. Level 2 includes phrases and shorter sentences, while Level 3 moves up to slightly longer sentences and additional writing exercises. This gradual progression helps to build writing stamina and to strengthen working memory. The dictation is meant to be spread over several days, so you can take as much or as little time on that part as your child needs.

If you’d like to see some samples:

All About Reading samples and scope and sequence links
All About Spelling samples and scope and sequence links

You might like to visit our Dyslexia Resources Page as well.

Here’s a comment thread from our Facebook Support group that has tons of responses from moms of kids with dyslexia, autism, ADHD, and other diagnoses.

Lastly, All About Reading and All About Spelling have a one-year “Go Ahead and Use It” guarantee. You can try it, and if for any reason you feel that it isn’t the right match for your grandson, return it for a full refund, excluding shipping.

I hope this helps, but please let me know if you have questions, need help with placement, or anything else.

Jeff

says:

My 8 years old daughter dislike reading and have problems with studies. We as parents started pushing her a lot. I feel she is trying her best and there’s unknown foundational issue. Please help as I feel she has started loosing her self esteem.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jeff,
I’m so sorry to hear about your daughter’s self-esteem. Poor child.

Often students struggle because they have gaps in the foundational skills and knowledge necessary for success. Our The “No Gaps” Approach to Reading and Spelling can make a difference.

Please let me know if you have specific concerns I can possibly help with.

Dipti Gupta

says:

My son Bhavya is now 7 years old and he is having reading difficulty and he is lacking behind in the class. He is not able to connect when ma’am is reading a chapter in the class and easily get distracted.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry your son Bhavya is having such difficulties, Dipti. Have you spoken with his teacher about your concerns and his struggles?