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Auditory Processing Disorder: 10 Ways to Help Your Child

Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

If you have a child who is struggling with an auditory processing disorder (APD), you probably have many questions.

And the biggest question of all is, “What can I do to help?” I have heard it again and again from concerned parents.

It can be so frustrating. You know your child can hear, but sometimes it seems like he can’t.

That’s what can happen in a child with auditory processing disorder (APD), or central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), as it is also called.

What Is Auditory Processing Disorder?

In a child with APD, the brain doesn’t recognize and interpret sounds correctly—especially the sounds that make up speech. Your child may appear to have an auditory deficit, but in most cases, hearing is not the problem. It’s like there’s a disconnect somewhere between the ears and the brain. He can hear what you say; he just can’t always process it.

A learner with APD is like an old computer with a fast, new processor. Neither the old computer nor the child with APD can keep up. The data goes in, but once it’s in, it can’t be processed quickly enough or efficiently enough. And in both cases the result is major frustration.

Auditory Processing Disorder Quick Guide

The Signs of Auditory Processing Disorder

The symptoms of auditory processing disorder can range from mild to severe and may look different from child to child. APD is diagnosed by an audiologist, but the child who has APD may display many of the following characteristics.

  • He may struggle to hear in crowded, noisy places.
  • He may frequently ask you to repeat yourself.
  • He may appear to be inattentive or he may be easily distracted.
  • He has difficulty following directions.
  • He may have noticeable speech delays.
  • He may seem to have heard you when he hasn’t.

APD and the Struggle to Read and Spell

Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

From the earliest stages of pre-reading instruction, when the development of phonemic awareness is so important, APD can make reading and spelling difficult. Because of the subtleties of similar-sounding phonemes, APD hampers a child’s ability to match letter names and sounds. This struggle continues to complicate the vital process of learning and using phonograms to build words. How can a child learn to use and manipulate the most basic building blocks of language if he can’t “hear” them to begin with? Just imagine the difficulty of attempting to complete blending and segmenting exercises when you already struggle to hear and process isolated phonemes.

Down the reading road, students with APD may have difficulty recalling what they’ve read or putting their thoughts into words. And because APD learners struggle to hear the individual sounds in words, they may also struggle with rhyming, observing spelling patterns, learning new vocabulary, reading comprehension, oral and written expression, and so much more. In addition to all of that, many APD learners also struggle with long-term memory issues that affect their ability to retain language-based knowledge. It’s not hard to understand why children with APD have such a difficult time with reading and spelling, is it?

Can All About Reading and All About Spelling Help My Child?

Although your APD child will face many academic challenges, you can help him learn to read and spell. All About Reading and All About Spelling offer an instructional approach that is well-suited to the needs of children with APD.

  • The programs are multisensory, meaning they approach learning through sight, sound, and touch. Because auditory instruction can be so difficult for children with APD, teaching through the visual and kinesthetic pathways is extremely important. This actually helps strengthen the weaker auditory pathway while still allowing learning to occur.
  • AAR and AAS use specially color-coded letter tiles. When your child has auditory processing issues, “wordy” explanations can create unnecessary frustration for both of you. It is much more effective to demonstrate a reading or spelling concept with the letter tiles. Using the letter tiles can make all the difference for a child struggling to understand a concept.
  • The programs are scripted in a clear and concise way without excess verbiage. Scripted lessons allow you to concentrate on your child rather than on trying to figure out how to teach a skill.
  • AAR and AAS have built-in review in every lesson. Children with auditory processing difficulties generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. You can’t assume that everything that has been taught has been learned. The review boxes in AAR and AAS lessons allow you to customize your child’s review, concentrating only on the skills and concepts that need additional review. Your APD learner likely has a short attention span, so you want every minute of your lesson to count.
  • Both AAR and AAS are logical and incremental. Children with auditory struggles need structure and clear guidance, and these programs provide the organization they need to learn.

Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

10 Ways to Help Your Child Learn

These tips may help you make your lesson times more productive and more enjoyable for both you and your child.

  1. Speak slowly and enunciate clearly. Pausing as you give instructions can also help your child process what you’re saying.
  2. Allow for “lag time” while your child processes what you have said. Let your words sink in for a few seconds before expecting a response or before moving on.
  3. Be concise and direct—don’t attempt long oral explanations. Give simple instructions, one step at a time. Instructing your child to “clean up your room, put on your pajamas, and brush your teeth” may be more than your child can handle.
  4. Work in a quiet room with as few distractions as possible. Listening and processing is hard enough for an APD child; distractions make it nearly impossible.
  5. Optimize concentration and minimize “meltdowns” by holding lessons during your child’s best time of day.
  6. Make sure that your child can watch your mouth as you speak. This is especially important if he easily confuses similar-sounding words. In APD learners, the ears and brain don’t work well together, so watching your mouth will help bring everything into synch. The sounds get “crisper” when the brain has visual cues to go along with the auditory cues.
  7. As much as possible, show rather than tell.
  8. Visual demonstrations are much more effective than oral explanations. If your APD child is struggling to learn a new concept or skill, try to teach the concept with a visual demonstration.
  9. Don’t overwhelm your child. Children with auditory processing issues can become disruptive or argumentative when they don’t understand something. If your child becomes frustrated and you sense a meltdown coming, back up in the lesson to a point where your child is more comfortable. Try presenting the new information again when your child seems ready to tackle it.
  10. Consistent and constant review encourages success, especially for APD learners. To ensure steady progress, be sure to include review in your lessons every single day.
Auditory Processing Disorder: How can I help my child? - All About Learning Press

Your child will face many challenges as an APD learner, but there is hope. By applying some of the tips above during your instruction times, you can help your child overcome these challenges. Just take it one day at a time, and over time you will see progress—and a much happier child.

And remember you’re not alone. If you have questions about your child’s APD and how it affects reading and spelling instruction, please feel free to call or email us.

Does your child struggle with APD? What has helped? Please share in the comments below!

Photo credits: Pam at Everyday Snapshots and Jodi at JodiMcKenna.com.

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Donovan Unruh RN

says:

We are Grandparents of a grandchild who has an auditory processing deficit. He is in second grade and they have just diagnosed the problem. It affects his math skills and his reading skills. How can we help him as grandparents? Would a professional audiologist be the person to consult for additional help outside of what he gets in the classroom? As we read the above explanation, the task before us is daunting, if not nearly impossible. The child is in a good school in the Denton, Texas area, the Huston Public School. They seem prepared to help. How can we help our Son and his significant others to get the resources to aid the student in question. Any advice you give us will be warmly and welcomingly received.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Donovan,
It is not impossible! Although, it can be daunting at times. Auditory process disorder can be a challenge for students, but with time and the right help, they can succeed with learning.

An audiologist is involved with diagnosing APD, but after diagnosis, most find more help with Speech-Language Pathologists (SLP) or speech therapy.

We know speech therapists and tutors who use All About Reading and All About Spelling with students who have auditory processing disorder. The Pre-reading level of All About Reading and the first five steps of the All About Spelling program focus on phonemic awareness, which is extremely important for children with APD.

Depending upon the individual case, sometimes the therapist or tutor uses a program such as the Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing Program (LiPS) to help the student recognize individual speech sounds in spoken words. Some students need this extra groundwork before beginning the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs, while others do not.

The All About Reading and All About Spelling programs are multisensory and use three main pathways to the brain: sight, sound, and touch. The multisensory approach is beneficial for kids with learning differences because when one pathway is weaker, it can be strengthened while still allowing learning to occur.

As for math, children with APD benefit from being shown visually and using manipulatives. If the way your grandchild is being taught is mostly oral explanations, it is very understandable that he is having trouble with math. We focus on reading and spelling, but there are math programs available that use hands-on and visual methods for instruction.

The school system could provide help in many ways, but the Orton-Gillingham Approach is worthwhile. There are many programs based on the OG approach, however, in addition to ours. The school should be able to detail what programs they will be using and what it is based on. Also, in the classroom, being placed where he can see the teacher’s face clearly can help with understanding. The teacher should be providing as much visual and hands-on instruction as possible, minimizing oral explanations of concepts.

I hope this helps some, but let me know if you have additional questions or concerns.

Wendy Karpac

says:

Excellent article. My granddaughter just turned 6 and is in kindergarten. I have suspected CAPD. She is very sweet but has difficulty playing games and following directions. I often have to repeat and reinforce the directions. She often would look at me with a confused look on her face while her younger cousin would comprehend right away. Very frustrating for her. She will not sit to listen to story books and the teacher says she doesn’t follow directions in school often leaving her behind. One on one she does well but is lost in the classroom experience. I did virtual learning with her, due to covid, and saw first hand her difficulty following at the normal classroom speed. My daughter is taking her to be tested today for CAPD. Her pediatrician reffered her after normal auditory and physical exam. She is to repeat kindergarten but I fear that without the proper diagnosis this will be an ongoing issue. I am going to share this blog with my daughter. She needs the support of others facing this issue with their children. Keep up the good work.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m glad this blog will be of help for your daughter, Wendy. If your daughter has questions, let her know we will help as we can.

stavroula

says:

hey ! I babysit a 22 months old boy . He walked a month ago, he has speech delay, he gets easily distracted and he can complete a task only by constant encouragement.He often leaves the one room and goes to the other. He is a billingual child(english+greek) and we can only hear 2 or 3 words. He uses one word most of the times. He does not say mom or dad. He rarely follows directions and orders. However, he is quite social and loves music.
Me and his parents believe that he does understand us but cannot express himself. He points with his index quite often, most of the times it is unclear where he point to. They went to a pediatrician , which suggested dyadic play with child psychologist and focus on activities that foster attention/concentration, completing tasks and creative play without encouragement. The parents want to go to another pediatrician but in some months to check upon his development.
Could it be Attention deficit disorder or auditory processing or is it too early for something like this to be diagnosed?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Stavroula,
If the child has not had his hearing tested yet, that would be the first thing I would recommend. A partial hearing loss can look like a learning disability, especially auditory processing disorder.

There is controversy over how young is too young to diagnose learning disabilities, and generally, most professionals put off testing until a child is 5 to 8 years old, depending on the kind of testing and the individual tester. However, testing for hearing can be done even with infants and it is a first step for testing for auditory processing disorder anyway.

Some of the things you described are actually quite common for a not-quite-2-year-old child, such as needing constant encouragement to complete a task. Getting a toddler to put even one toy away can be a monumental achievement at times, I know!

There is a correlation between speech delay and having difficulties learning to read later, so it is reasonable to follow up on those concerns. However, I have heard that bilingual children master speaking at a slower rate than single-language toddlers, so that may be coming into play. Dyadic play that focuses on encouraging the child to speak more is effective; my own child did similar therapy when he was 2 and he made great improvements in his expressive language skills in a short time.

I hope this helps some. Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Sophia

says:

Very helpful tips to support kids to really get the knowledge in permanently!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Sophia!

Casey

says:

I have a speech delayed kiddo, I’m going to look into this more with her therapy team! Helpful info!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m glad this was helpful for you, Casey.

Avni

says:

Helpful post.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Avni!

Kea Seepamore

says:

Hi my name is Kea and I’m 30 years of age and Its bee about 5 years struggling to understand what’s happening with my brains, memory and intelligence. I read this article and I see alot of common symptoms I am experiencing even today. Will I get help with an APD condition at this age?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kea,
It can be helpful to be aware of learning disabilities at any age. As you learn about auditory processing disorder, you can begin to make choices that will help you help yourself. For example, you can keep a small notebook with you so you can write things down immediately, or even ask others to write addresses or whatever down. You can also be aware that being able to see the face of whoever is speaking can help you understand.

However, it is worthwhile to speak with your doctor about your concerns. Many of the symptoms of APD are the same symptoms of a partial hearing loss.

ESmith

says:

We have a child with APD and a phonological speech disorder. The suggestions above are great! I’ve also found having a mirror handy is a helpful tool too. I will say the challenging word, then I will have him/herself watch their reflection as they say the word too. The mirror helps him/her check to make sure the tongue, lips and teeth are in the right position during the breath flow.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Great tip about the mirror! Thank you for sharing it.

constance gunn

says:

I like this blog

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Constance!

Melanie Percy

says:

I am 65 years old and only when my daughter was diagnosed with CAPD at 7 years of age, did I learn what I also had. All of my life I had difficulty understanding people, especially over the phone. Verbal instructions have been useless, if I want to know something I have to either read it or watch someone demonstrate it. I did find the CAPD improved over time. I used to be unable to write down a number or a name given to me over the phone. Somehow at around the age of 35 yrs, I was suddenly able to do that. Thank goodness for texting now, because I can understand everything I read so much more easily.
As a child I remember being baffled by long and short vowel sounds. While m, in college I often would write down the words a professor was saying, but not understand it until much later when I read my notes. I realized that I didn’t have to understand the words to be able to write them, I just focused on the words and not the meaning. When my daughter (she is now 34yrs old). was in grade school, she would bring her school work home and I would reteach her using visual or tactile methods. Once she understood a lesson, she was able to learn very quickly. Now she has two Masters degrees from Johns Hopkins in Nursing and Public Health. Throughout high school we were afraid that she would never go to college because she had so much difficulty understanding what was said in the classroom. Guess we were wrong!
And for those of you with children who have CAPD, just an FYI. I became a college professor, I teach nursing and research to graduate students at Rutgers University. Do not worry, help your child as much as possible and advocate for them to get the education they need, and don’t take “no” for an answer.

Donovan Unruh RN

says:

WOW, that is a powerful, but encouraging story that you have written. First of all, you overcame, even before this disorder was evening known. And you helped your daughter. That gives us grandparents courage, and maybe some insight into the learning difficulties of our own son when he was growing up and going through school. Thank you for sharing this powerful story. I sure it will be an encouragement to many parents who have children out this with an auditory learning disorder.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you so much for sharing your daughter’s story, Melanie! So encouraging!

Melanie

says:

You are very welcome! I am glad that you found it encouraging. :)

Tulisha

says:

Thank you for helpful information

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Tulisha. I’m glad this was helpful for you.

Amy

says:

Thank you for this information.
My 10 year old is very bright and intelligent, though sometimes (okay, MOREtimes) looks lost and confussed in conversations.
His yearly check up with the pedatritian is coming up and we were going to bring up some of these concerns with her. The information from this blog will be very helpful in expressing our concerns.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m glad this was helpful for you, Amy. I hope you are able to get your child help for his needs.

Kristin Evans

says:

Very informative article!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Kristin!

Craig Feeley

says:

well I’m not a child I’m 57 years old and I’ve had a problem all my life figuring out what my problem is I’m adopted and I found my real family my brother has ADHD and audio programming dysfunction and this one here APD I think I have it too what do I do at my age it’s been bothering me all my life I need help I have other problems too I’m sure of it

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry you have had difficulties for so long, Craig. Often when adults realize there is a reason for their difficulties and begin to research, they find encouragement and methods to help themselves have better success. I hope it is the same for you.

If you have any specific questions, please let me know.

Allison Fletcher

says:

I’m afraid my son’s language is below his age level. What should I be expecting in oral language from my 4 year old son?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Allison,
I’m sorry I can’t help much. All About Learning Press is focused on helping to take the struggle out of learning to read and spell. I can’t really help with developing a child’s spoken language skills.

Your child’s pediatrician should be able to evaluate his language abilities and refer him to a speech therapist or other intervention possibilities if needed. Also, many public school districts offer speech therapy even for preschool-aged students.

Whitney

says:

So me. I saw the note about your son having more difficulty when he’s tired. Yes, yes, yes.
Example dialog (true story): “Oh, I’m all out of panty liners.” “Well, you can use one of mine.” “I DON’T LIKE YOURS!” “Wha- what’s wrong with them?!” “I — wait, what did you just think I said?” “You said you’re all out of panty liners.” “HAHAHAHA. I said I was all out of CANDY bars…” ahhhh…

I hear (like, presumably, other CAPD-ers) mumbo jumbo mixed into actual words (I think I heard words!). Processing that involves comparing the sounds to words that may have something to do with recent conversations, most recent first. Run through an internal dictionary comparing and then putting things into context to see if it makes sense. It’s fast – seconds, usually, sometimes faster – but during that processing, I look blank. I respond to what I think I heard. Most of the time, I get by. Sometimes, the above happens. Especially when it’s a sudden out of the blue question or statement. Without context, it’s guesswork.

Now try thinking that fast when you’re tired. Good luck. I’m 43 now and over the past decade I realised it’s really not my fault and it’s ok to point out the issue. Now I’m not abashed to say, “I’m tired, so I’m having a nearly impossible time understanding anything you say. If it’s important, please repeat.” I’ve spent a long time trying to fit in with how others hear. I don’t consider myself disabled. My brain simply works a bit differently. If people can’t get that, too bad.

Some things that help me: Taking meeting minutes/notes. Helps keep me focused. Sleep and good nutrition timed right, or the meeting is just going to put me to sleep or cause disruption as I get totally lost. Asking people to face me when I’m in a particularly bad predicament. Selecting my seat based on acoustics in the room and where other people might be. Studying music. I’ve noticed that if I really intently focus on music and try to pick out individual instruments, rhythms, notes, I “hear” better. No idea why, but I know someone else who felt the same way (he became a musician, in fact). Avoiding large gatherings. (I have limits… and I’m strongly introverted so this is easy for me. I feel for extroverts with CAPD.)

To any parents and fellow CAPD’ers out there: Remember to look at the bright side of CAPD, too! I was diagnosed twice, one about age five and again around 16. I was shy and never made it known so simply fell behind in school, but some of my other senses picked up the slack and once I figured that out, began using my strengths rather than only focusing on the weaknesses. Because of CAPD, I recognise delays in others and find I have far more patience because I understand and have empathy. Some of the misunderstandings (misheard words) can become hysterical. I amuse myself frequently with everything I mis-interpret and often tell others what I heard so they can laugh, too. The frustration is real, but the compassion and amusement make it ok to me. It also caused some social issues early on which likely contributed to my career in computers – the ability to tune sound out due to its inconsistencies allowed me to hone detailed skills that help me now.

Humans are not meant to be exactly the same. So, we’re not. Sometimes it helps to remind myself of that. A friend once said: We all have our things. :)

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for sharing tips and ideas that have helped you, Whitney! Such great ideas here.

Karalyn Johnston

says:

Want to help grandson with APD

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Karalyn,
There are some effective tips in this blog post, but do you have additional questions or specific concerns? Let me know if I can help you with anything.

Kris

says:

If I believe my child might have APD, should we see an audiologist or a speech therapist? Thank you.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kris,
Good question. The place to start would be an audiologist, although a speech therapist would probably refer you to an audiologist too. Many of the symptoms and signs of auditory processing disorder are the same as the symptoms and signs of partial hearing loss, yet the treatment for APD and partial hearing loss are different. An audiologist is needed to evaluate if the child hears well.

Lala

says:

My son stated his primary school recently.this is his third week.he is quite shy and sensible personality.And we talk in native language at home.but he is comfortable with English. He started to talk like a sentence in his 4 years old.he passed the audiology test.
Now the primary school teacher said he is not responding commands.like when she asks go and wash your hands he just go and stays in the toilet.
And he knows to write letters and name. But teacher said not doing it.
How can I help him?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lala,
This may not be a learning disability issue. School and functioning all in English sounds like it is new to him, and he may be struggling more emotionally.

Ask him why he isn’t doing as the teacher says. Lovingly discuss with him the importance of listening and responding in English and find out what he is thinking and feeling. Maybe he doesn’t understand the teacher well. She could have an accent or way of speaking he isn’t familiar with. Or maybe he is missing home or he is staying in the toilet to be away from another child he doesn’t like. Even young children often have great insights into why they do what they do, but it takes time to get that information out of them.

I hope you find how to help your son with this new experience. If there is anything I can help with, please let me know.

Lala

says:

Thank you Robin.feeling so relax after reading your reply.
Yes you are correct.Today morning before he go to school he said he want to stay at home and play. Then asked me to come and stay with him.
The teacher complained that let him to do his work at home independently.but at home most of his work he does by himself
How to talk about this to the teacher?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Lala,
It will be best to make an appointment to have a discussion with your son’s teacher. That way the teacher can focus fully on your concerns and won’t be distracted by getting kids settled or other things that a teacher needs to do. Then state your concerns. I’m sure if his teacher has been teaching for any time she will have experience with this sort of thing. It’s pretty common for children in their first year of school.

Seema

says:

Hi
My son is 2years and 10 months but he is saying only alphabets and bombers . He is following any commands . He is saying poem but not with proper words .
What to do ? Is he will come in normal ?

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m unsure, Seema. Often little ones will start speaking by repeating things before transitioning into speaking their own words. However, there is a possibility there could be a speech or language problem.

I recommend you have him seen by your doctor and possibly request an evaluation by a speech therapist that works with very young children. I’m sorry I’m not more help.

Adriana

says:

My son is going into 5th grade. Are there any tips on books or materials I can look into to help him. He was diagnosed in 2nd grade and has an IEP.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Adriana,
All About Reading and All About Spelling worked wonders for my children with auditory processing disorder.

maata wharehoka

says:

This is so like my granddaughter. I am so pleased there is a diagnosis that I can work with. I have trialed different ways to work with her based on some things I learnt as a mum
1. She has three different teachers as school, one who bribes the kids with lollies and the other yells at them. I take her out of school when her main teacher the principal is absent. I do believe that the child needs one voice of reinforcement not three. Then there is my voice at home as well.
2. I allowed her to take her time to complete the learning components of reading writing and math, this lasted for three months, no pressure was applied to complete tasks, idea was for her to learn that she could achieve by being given more time to complete her work.
3. I figured her short term memory was not good, so I would get her to repeat what i had said to her, I would also wrote it down, and with what ever reading fashion she had she could work it out. I encouraged her to complete tasks. I got her writing stories. She used to take an hour write one sentence. Now, in three hours she can write two pages of 1B and doesnt want to stop writing.
4. She improved her writing technique over that three month period. It took her nearly one week to master the shapes of the letters and words
5. I did up a word list for her, that I felt was achievable because they were common words, then she could use it to spell. Sometimes she could and other times she couldnt and would say “well I dunno how to spell it can you tell me” this is after the third or forth time. I quickly realised her short term memory was not good. I cut up show cards for her to write the words herself. I never got to write them up.
6. This term I am using a timer on her to achieve working faster with getting showered, dressed, making her bed, washing dishes. She loves the challenge.

I hope I havent made things wrong for her, but I know she has done really well and achieved so much in the short while I have had her.

She is good at practical things like sewing, using a machine. Cooking, knitting, Indeed good at singing and learning karakia. Things with rhythm. When she does not compute I make a ditty for her as a memory pattern.

She does not know why she does things the way she does.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Maata,
You have made some amazing progress with your granddaughter in a short period of time! What you are doing is working, so keep doing it. I recommend you speak with her school in detail about what you have been doing and the amazing progress she has had from it. Hopefully they will be able to do similar things at school to support the success you are having at home.

Tangy Thomas

says:

Hello
I have a 9 years old boy white is on an IEP due to having dyslexia. I am figuring out that he had an auditory issue due to processing what he is trying to sound out. This article it’s my son to a to a tee. How do I order the Aas program and do you start with level 1 no matter what?

Thanks

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Tangy,
We do have a spelling placement test that I think you will find helpful. However, students that struggle with spelling almost always need to start with level 1 because they are missing foundational skills.

Although, if the words are easy for your student in the lower levels, you can fast-track through them to ensure he learns the skills he is missing while moving on to higher levels as quickly as possible. Our blog post Using All About Spelling with Older Students.

You can order All About Spelling here.

Please let me know if you have any questions or need more information.

Amy Foss

says:

We have a daughter in college. She was IEP in High School. Wants to be a Physical Therapist. A lot of math & science classes. Attended her first year at Ithaca college. Suppose to be a6 year program. Did not do well1st semester . Now has to be a science major & transfer after 4 years. & take GRE. How do we help her get through regular classes before major classes start? She needs a lot of help everyday.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
Your daughter needs to contact the Student Accessibility Services at her college (the link is to the webpage for this office at Ithaca College).

They will be able to help her with what is needed to document her disability and what accommodations she needs to be successful in school. They will be specialists in helping students have the best opportunities for success at Ithaca.

Fadwa Elmasri

says:

Thank you. Is fantastic

Brittany Leader

says:

I just ordered AAR Level 1 and am so excited to start with my 7yr old. Since my order, I’ve been receiving a lot of emails with helpful tips for reluctant readers. We homeschool because my daughter has ADHD (inattentive) and there were too many distractions for her in a classroom of 28 students. I am finding the more I research things that she is struggling with academically, the more I can relate it to myself as a young student. While I am reading about APD, I am realizing these are all things I struggle with as an adult. I know ADHD can be genetic and I’m interested to find out if APD can also be genetic. Thank you for this blog post, it was eye opening!

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Brittany,

I’m glad the article was helpful! There’s a lot to learn yet about the possible causes for APD, but here’s one study that suggests there may be a heritable component to it: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4872837/

Traci schuh

says:

My name is Traci Schuh and I have lived with capd my whole life. Almost 37 years and now realizing more and more about myself in detail. I was diagnosed in third grade with capd and addi inattentive. I hate the way my brain works and it gets so frustrating. I’m learning I’ve become mute in certain situations in life and now recognize it. It was totally a coping mechanism for me because I couldn’t speak. Now with work doing hair my anxiety is so high sometimes. I’m wanting toilet my peers know more about me but also just feel new learning more and more about my self every day.
Please help. I feel like my anxiety is getting worse

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Traci,
I’m so sorry that you are struggling in this way. I do think it will be helpful to let those you work with know about your learning difficulties. I have described my son’s APD as a loose wire in the brain. I explained that he hears fine but there is a delay or disconnect in the processing of what he hears. Let your co-workers know that it can be worse at certain times, and then tell them when. My son has trouble in places in noisy environments where lots of people are talking. He also has more difficulties when he is tired.

I hope this helps some, but please let me know if you need anything else.

Marjorie Russell

says:

A-B-C steps of starting to work with auditory teaching.

Michael Iskowitz

says:

I am hearing impaired. I went to audiology at age five. Back in 1975. The audiologist tested me. And I was found hearing only the vowels and not other 21 letters in alphabet. I didn’t start exhibiting to people my dark side. I was very introvert. I excelled in art. But now I been struggling. I put smile on my pain. I see I have these condition with hearing impairment. The condition you mentioned. I lived confused for long time. I struggled and I couldnt express. Now I’m suffering paranoia or anxiety. I struggle so hard with my impairment since teenager. I speak beautifully. And I could hear. SomewhatBut very frustrating. To be in hearing world. Too long. I feel left behind.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

I’m so sorry you have felt left behind, Michael, but thank you for sharing your story with us. Let me know if there is anything I can do for you.

Sheree Garcia

says:

I have guardianship over my 2 1/2 year old grandson with APD that was recieving in home services 4 times a week, due to the Coronavirus the teachers are no longer coming to the house , I have noticed him withdrawing, he was starting to speak a few words but is no longer doing that. I need to pick up the torch so to speak and keep it burning for him. Please email me any suggestions as I am eager to get busy teaching him :) P.S. His grandparents are Spanish, do you have this available in Spanish so I can send it to them as well so that they can understand what he is going through? thank you ! Sheree

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Sheree,
I appreciate you trying to help your grandson. The focus of our company, All About Learning Press, is taking the struggle out of learning to read and spell in English. We don’t have much to offer to help with speech therapy.

However, I can offer a few suggestions. My third child has APD and I can tell you the things I did with him when he was two and a half.

First, I read aloud to him daily. Because of his auditory processing disorder and speech delays, I couldn’t read typical picture books aimed at two-year-olds. I had to back up to books marketed to infants, typically the ones that had not more than a single, simple sentence per page with a bright and detailed picture. He strongly preferred books with photographs rather than drawings, so I went out of my way to get books with photographs on each page. The publisher DK has a wonderful selection of baby books with photographic images.

As I read aloud to him, I also talked more about the picture, what was happening, and asked questions. “Look, the girl is playing with a ball. The ball is red. Do you see the red ball? Where is the ball? Ball,” and would encourage him to repeat words and point to things. All day long as we went about doing normal things, I did this sort of talking and encouraging repetition from him. “It’s time for lunch. Do you want to eat? Yes?” and wait for a response. My son was great at responding in non-verbal ways with nods, facial expressions, sound effects, and gestures. I spent a lot of time encouraging him to add words to his responses but aimed to avoid frustrating him. I would give him the word to say so he could immediately repeat it, and then would praise him if he tried at all even if he didn’t say the word correctly.

As mentioned in this blog post, with a child with APD it is best to work in a quiet room with as few distractions as possible. Listening and processing are hard enough for an APD child; distractions make it nearly impossible. This is especially important when learning to speak. So, in my house, we kept sounds to a minimum all day. That meant no TV, no radio, no sound on electronics until after dinner. I had two older children and a baby, so I also needed to set aside time to work with my son when the other three kids were quiet. I did this during my baby’s morning nap and had the older kids doing some quiet activity in the other room.

Can you contact your grandson’s teachers? They should be able to give you ideas, email you lessons, or tell you what to do over the phone to help you keep working with him.

I’m sorry, but we don’t have this available in any other language as our focus is learning to read and spell English.

I hope this helps some.

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