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Real Moms, Real Kids: A Typical Day with AAR

Real Moms, Real Kids: A Typical Day with AAR with Robin W.

Have you ever wondered what’s involved in a typical day with AAR?

Robin E. Williams is a real mom who uses All About Reading and All About Spelling with her own kids. Robin is also a part of our Customer Care team. Join Robin as she shares what a typical day with AAR looks like in her homeschool.

Here’s Robin…

Moms often ask what a typical day with AAR is like, and they particularly want to know how other moms divide up a lesson over many days. I’d like to describe what happens in our homeschool and give you a peek inside our lessons.

First, I start by gathering the All About Reading materials and my student.

We start the day’s lesson by reviewing word cards. My daughter, Belle, is grasping the concepts in All About Reading easily and well, but fluency is coming more slowly for her. Since I don’t move a Word Card to behind the “Mastered” tab until she can read it without sounding it out, she has built up a thick stack of “Review” cards. So I have her read through the stack for two or three minutes, picking up the next day where she left off.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading with Robin Williams

Once a week or so, we review with games. Though the All About Reading Level 1 Ziggy Supplement specifically correlates with All About Reading Level 1, these games will work with cards from any level. So I combine my daughter’s All About Reading review with my older boys’ All About Spelling Level 5 and Level 3 review. In the picture below, they are using a game that requires the players to count syllables in words. In addition to doing the syllable activity, I also required them to read a Phonogram Card before moving the allotted number of spaces. They are all willing to review much longer than usual when they are playing a game!

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading with Robin Williams

After review, we move onto the New Lesson section in the Teacher’s Manual. Every other lesson begins with new concepts that are introduced with the letter tiles to make the teaching multisensory. I don’t have a lot of wall space in our school/family room, so I hung my magnet board vertically. I use a magnetic chalkboard instead of a white board, mostly because I had one on hand. (I keep my Spelling Strategies and Syllable Types charts for All About Spelling tacked up right next to the magnet board so we won’t lose them!)

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading with Robin Williams

After working with the new concepts, we move on to the fluency practice sheet. Because my daughter struggles with fluency, she really doesn’t enjoy this part of the lesson. I divide most sheets up over at least two days; some of the longer ones we spend as much as four days on. Each day I have her read some of the new words, some of the review words, some of the phrases, and some of the sentences. I allow her to choose which of each to read, and she marks off a row after she has read it.

On the second day of a new concept lesson, after reviewing the cards, we quickly review the concept with the tiles and then move onto the activity sheets. I do not pre-cut the activity sheets because Belle enjoys cutting them herself. We keep the pieces in an envelope in her pocket folder just in case we want to revisit the activity. We finish this day with more fluency sheet reading.

By the third day of a lesson (or fourth day, if necessary), the lesson’s word cards have been read over at least a couple times and have been shuffled into the stack for more mixed review. We revisit concept teaching with the tiles, mix in game review, and redo activity pages as Belle slowly works through the fluency practice sheet.

For lessons that have a short story scheduled, we begin the lesson as usual with review of the cards and then we “buddy read” the story. I read a page aloud, slowly but with good expression, and then Belle reads a page. We continue this way through the story. The following day, after reviewing the cards, we buddy read the story again but switch the pages we read. On the final day of a short story, Belle reads the entire story herself. By the third time through her reading is usually smoother and much more fluent.

Real Moms, Real Kids: All About Reading with Robin Williams

I hope this gives you some idea how a reading lesson can be divided over many days, aiming for about 20 minutes on each day.

Here’s What I Love about Robin’s Story

  • Belle’s review of the Word Cards is short and brisk, just two to three minutes long.
  • Robin adapted a game to make additional review more interesting, and her older children can join in.
  • Recognizing the importance of fluency practice, Robin figured out a way to make this portion of the lesson more palatable for her daughter.
  • Robin keeps the activity sheet pieces in an envelope so the activities can be reused later.
  • I love the buddy reading idea! In fact I loved the idea so much, we asked Robin to share more about it. You can read more about it in this post!
  • She sticks to a 20-minute time limit, stopping before her daughter reaches a frustration point. This is important; you want your child to be interested in coming back for more.

Products Robin is using with Belle

Did you enjoy Robin’s story? Read more stories in our Real Moms, Real Kids series.

What were your main take-aways from Robin’s story? Was this helpful for you?

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Leave a Comment

Eileen

says:

This was very helpful. I think I was getting stuck in the idea that “progress” meant “one lesson per day ” or “finishing the program” rather than “mastery” — and my son and I were both getting frustrated. Thank you so much for giving us permission to just …. slow down. I had thought following your plan might draw out the lessons too much and make it seem “boring,” but the opposite has turned out to be true. His favorite part of the lesson? The two minute word card review! He likes to record how many words he read correctly each day, and beat the previous day’s record. He also appreciates not doing the fluency sheet all in one sitting — I have him pick out 3-4 sentences to read ,and circle 2-3 word groups. He’ll do that much of the sheet happily on most days, and it all just works so much better. We also actually set a timer for the lessons, so he knows the end is actually in sight. The improvement in his attitude is doing more to facilitate his progress than anything else. Thank you so much for sharing this!

Robin E. at All About Learning Press

says: Customer Service

Eileen,
I’m so glad to hear how this blog post has helped your son to enjoy reading and make progress! Slow and steady works wonderfully! It’s a year later, and my daughter is now moving through lessons much more quickly, about 2 days for concept lessons and 1 day for story lesson. She is able to do this now, because we took the time to build up her fluency.

Nicole Abrazian

says:

Thanks for this article. I will be using this program with my 9 year old and my 5 year old when I start schooling them next month. I was having trouble figuring out how to spread it out over several days. I can’t wait to implement this into their school days.

Nicole,
You are welcome. The trick is to move at a pace that is comfortable for your student. Some will be comfortable moving through the lessons faster, and some, like my daughter, needs more time.

Let us know if you have any questions or if we can help in any way. I hope you have a GREAT school year!

Sarah L Dupree

says:

This was so helpful in making my decision to use All About Reading!

Stacey

says:

We just started level 1 with my six year old son. He is loving the program.

Jen R

says:

I think my 6yo daughter would love this!

Julie F

says:

We have homeschooled for 10 years. I wish I had “All About Learning” when I started. We have used All About Spelling this year and have loved it!

Tonya Ferguson

says:

I like this blog

Stephanie Kilgore

says:

This is my second year to homeschool and I am clueless *I feel* on how to teach certain subjects. I am always looking for a great way to help my kids learn. Where I live they have a program called barks, books and buddies. Your child reads to a dog – a non-judgmental listener-and my oldest daughter really enjoys it!

Merry at AALP

says:

Very cute! I’ve heard of similar programs (and reading to the family pet or a favorite stuffed animal is popular too!)

Andrea

says:

I have a 7-year-old son who is struggling to read. I just bought AAR Level 1 and I’m going to be using this post to help implement it for him. Thanks!

Andrea,
You’re welcome! It can be frustrating and scary when your child struggles; I know I worry about Belle’s struggles and she is my third child in a row to do so. Yet her brothers overcame their struggles and now happily read at grade level or above, and I keep telling myself that slow and steady with the right materials Belle will get there too. So will your son.

Let us know if there is any questions or concerns we can help with along the journey.

Anuhea

says:

I will be homeschooling my daughter for kindergarten next year. This program looks awesome and I love seeing these reviews on how it is implemented in a real home setting.

Beth Naas

says:

I really like the buddy reading idea. We are new to All About Reading, but my son is enjoying it, and I really like the flexible nature of the lessons. Thanks for sharing how you structure your AAR time with us.

Kortnei

says:

With my son being autistic reading was the most difficult thing! The lessons are so short and he doesn’t seem to get bored. We actually have fun with the letter tiles on our white board. It really just ‘clicked’ with him! Thank you so much!

Anna Chan

says:

The timer – that seems like a good key to avoiding frustration. Will be trying that with my 6yr old reluctant reader. Thanks!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Anna. I hope the timer helps!

k

says:

I Am looking for a reading and spelling program for my daughter.

Katherine H

says:

I’m looking for a phonics program and I’d love to try AAR with my daughter!

Tamara Dillard

says:

I have an 11 yr old Autistic daughter who struggles and fights me to read. This seems like an absolutely wonderful program to try with her. Thank you so much for sharing and the chance to win it.

Riki

says:

such a wonderful site. I always get fresh new ideas.

Patti

says:

Wonderful tips and suggestions!

Jennifer S

says:

I like hearing how the game works with any level! I have one in AAS 5, one about to start AAS 1, and one who needs help reading. He should be in AAR 1.

Dawn Kennedy

says:

I think this would be helpful for my kids. Love to see the smiles on their faces.

Cristina

says:

Thanks for the tips! :-)

Kala

says:

This was very helpful!

Taylor

says:

Wonderful program!

Faye Yarbrough

says:

new to homeschooling. Since October actually. Checking this out!

Kelly

says:

I appreciate the suggestion of reading the story 3 times, twice using the buddy reading approach. I think this is something I’ll try with my child.

Rayleen

says:

very hand :)

Rayleen

says:

handy*** lol autocorrect

Tami Lewis

says:

This sounds like something my son needs!

katie

says:

seems like a great program

Rachel Freer

says:

Thank you for showing what an average day looks like!

Sarah

says:

I’ve been thinking about AAR for my daughter. Thanks for sharing what a day of AAR can look like!

Carrie

says:

I’ve used AAR and AAS with both of my ESL sons, age 6 and 11, for the past 3 months. They have really excelled at this program, and have both finished one level already. They LOVE the readers, and are motivated to read independently all the time now. It’s so easy to teach, and am even learning things that I didn’t know!

Carrie,
Thank you for sharing! We get questions about our products for English-as-a-Second-Language students and it’s great to hear it has worked well for your boys. Keep up the good work!

Deanna Jensen

says:

This looks like a great program. I struggle with how to teach reading.

Isabelle Lussier

says:

Fabulous to see how people use the program in their own homeschool!

Andrea

says:

I love the idea of having your kids (all at different levels) play the games together with each child using his/her own stack of cards.

Jodi M

says:

I’ve been thinking about this program for my children, great info. Thanks!

Stephanie G

says:

I’ve been looking at this program for my struggling reader and it was very informative to see what an average set of lessons looked like.

Laura

says:

As a person that loves to read and was reading from an early age, I am not sure what to do with a child that doesn’t like to read. This program looks like it may be what we need.

Jaimi

says:

This is a great example of what I love about homeschooling-The opportunity to mold a lesson specifically to your child’s learning needs as they build the foundations of knowledge.

Joy

says:

I love the buddy reading idea! I think that would really help my daughter not feel overwhelmed!

Paola

says:

I have so many questions about the program, specially because I have used other program before. Thank you for shedding some light with this post. I would like to give this a try, we will see.

Tammy Jones

says:

Thanks for the insight of what it looks like to use it.

Crystal

says:

I have been researching reading programs for my struggling reader. And I think this is the one. AAL has great customer service.

Crystal,
Thank you for such a nice comment about our customer service. We do try hard, but it sure is nice to hear we are hitting the mark once in a while!

Tanya

says:

This was so refreshing to read! I have been using AAR for a few years now, and I always wondered how long others spend on a given concept/lesson. This is very similar to how we use it now. In the beginning, we spent much less time on each lesson and it turned out to not be long enough. He always picked up on the new concepts very quickly, but because we didn’t spend much time on it before moving on to the next concept, it was also easily forgotten. I am very happy with the rhythm we have now. He definitely benefits from spending the extra time on a lesson even after he “gets it.” I LOVE the idea to buddy read 2 days, alternating the pages, and then have the student read solo on the third day for fluency! I will definitely use that one!

Tanya,
When I was first asked to write how we do AAR, I wasn’t sure how it would turn out. I very glad you found this post helpful. Isn’t this program great that we can spend extra time reviewing without boring our students?!?

Thank you for sharing your experiences.

Robyn McLeod

says:

We do some very similar division of a lesson in our house. I must say thought that I think my son would revolt if I had him read the same story three times – but I’ve never tried it with different parts. It’s something to ponder since fluency is also something he struggles with. Thanks for sharing!

Robyn
Do give the buddy reading a try and see how it goes. My daughter was over the rainbow happy the first time we tried it, because she only had to read every other page the first two days. Then the third day she was happy because she found it so much easier to read.

We even play argue over who gets to read “The End” each day, with lots of giggles.

Kelly

says:

love personal stories like this. So inspiring.

Megan C

says:

I have to say that we LOVE AAR in my house! It has been a blessing to us as I started out with a struggling reader who hated reading lessons. Now we are on level 3 of AAR and my son is doing SO well! He can read fluently and looks forward to reading lessons. I also have a natural reader who has been successful with reading from the beginning. Even though he is a self-starter and can teach much of this one his own, he loves doing the AAR lessons too. We’ve modified them to fit both of our children and it works wonderfully. I can’t wait to begin level 1 again with our younger children.

Wendy Clark

says:

Can’t wait to start this program with my son this summer.

Betsy

says:

Really hoping to start Level 2 with my son soon. 20 min a day would be perfect for him.

Cassi Davis

says:

This is amazing. Just what I need to do.

Melissa

says:

This product sounds interesting for my older kids to continue reading.

KH

says:

Looking into All About Reading for my first grader. He just needs some help and I think this would be just the ticket to push him into fluency!

NW

says:

The materials sound pretty interesting. I must look into them a little further

barbie w

says:

LOVE all about reading!! I have used the level one, and its been the “thing” that finally made a breakthrough to progress with my son. He loves it!! We plan on using all 4 levels for sure.

Merry at AALP

says:

Awesome! So glad it’s been helpful for your son.

K L

says:

This seems to be exactly what we need. No complications. simple.

Megan Faultner

says:

I love how you made the game work for the different grade levels of your children! :)

sarah

says:

I really like the game including the different levels. Always looking for ways to get the kids learning together.

Sara Alexander

says:

Great tips, thanks! I love your materials.

melissa

says:

so great to get another mom’s experience and perspective!

Elizabeth parker

says:

Great information!!

malyn

says:

thank you for this fantastic idea! will be teaching my kid how to read in a few months

Heather

says:

I am always struggling to get my daughter to read. She is an excellent reader, but she just doesn’t seem interested. I am interested in trying this program to see if it will be engaging enough to keep her attention.

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Heather,

How old is she? I remember struggling to make the jump from the picture books I loved as a younger child, and chapter books with few or no pictures. I couldn’t understand why anyone wouldn’t want to fill a book with beautiful pictures! If you think that could be an issue, you may want to let her read easier books for a time, or use audio books to help her bridge that gap. There are a lot of good stories, novels, and plays on CD, and kids can listen while they draw, color, play with dolls or legos, and so on.

If motivation is the issue instead, help her discover a new hobby (or help her develop an existing hobby). If she likes cacti, check out books from the library on cacti. If she likes rocketry or models, get a kit and read the instructions together. Bake from a recipe together. Let her pick out an age-appropriate magazine on a topic that is interesting to her. These types of activities can help children find the motivation to learn to read.

I let my kids stay up an extra half hour if they wanted to read in bed, so that was motivation as well.

Sometimes technology gets in the way and can be an issue–reading takes more patience than the instant reward of TV, video, and computer games. Limiting that can help students find other ways to entertain themselves.

Model good reading habits. Have time each day when you read so that she sees how much you value reading.

Reading aloud to a child is also a great way to develop an interest in reading. Choose high-quality stories and novels that appeal to her age and interests. Develop a nightly habit of reading to her before bedtime if you haven’t already. I actually still read to my teenagers, and it’s a wonderful time to share conversation together over a good book.

Sonlight has lots of good read-alouds–their choices are often award-winning books.

I hope this gives you some ideas!

Jennifer O

says:

Thanks for sharing lots of great ideas!

Melissa Bell

says:

I like the idea of breaking the lesson into a few days. I have a “slower” learner that I am beginning to teach to read. This would help us both!

Tania

says:

This program looks like it’s exactly what we need for my child! Can’t wait to explore it with her!

Karen Carlton

says:

love all about spelling!!

Miranda Gill

says:

hi, im new to homeschooling this year..looking forward to learning as much as i can to better improve my childrens educations

wendy

says:

great ideas!

Caiti

says:

We are to yet homeschooling but we are interested and looking at options…..this one seems very versatile and easy to use!

Kristal

says:

This program sounds like what I have been looking for. With three boys, it has been difficult on me to teach with different learning styles with vastly different curriculum for each one.

Elizabeth

says:

I love this!! Lots of great ideas.

Amy Beverley

says:

This looks like a great giveaway.

Heather

says:

This is very helpful to see how you actually use the program in your home.
Thanks for sharing the pictures!

Tiffany

says:

You guys rock!

Haha! Thanks, Tiffany! :) Robin and Belle are doing an awesome job together.

Tanya G

says:

Amazing! Reading this has steered my sails to AAR & AAS

Vanessa

says:

I really liked the game, and I’m considering buying it, as I thought it could only be used for level 1…

Karen Anderson

says:

I am looking forward to starting All About Spelling with my son soon.

Monika

says:

I’d love to try All About Spelling with my girls!

Emily Woodall

says:

Wow! I love this. The photos are so warm and homey.

These are great ideas. My daughter also really struggles with the fluency practice sheets. I let her highlight a row and then read it. That seems to make it more fun for some reason. After reading the row, we put a tiny sticker at the end of it.

I love the buddy reading idea. I also think Robin’s review methods are just great.

Thanks for sharing how AAR actually plays out in a real home!

Hi Emily! Thanks for your kind words. Robin is a great photographer, as well as an inspiring mom.

Good idea for helping your daughter with the fluency practice sheets. You might like to read this blog post, too, which gives additional ideas for practice: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/5-tips-for-practice-sheets/

Suzanne

says:

These are great ideas. My son is currently on level 2 with an older brother in spelling level 3 so I will definitely be trying the game so we can review together. And I love the idea of buddy reading but doing it more than one day so he is actually reading the whole story. Thanks for sharing.

Kerri Egle

says:

Does anyone know if this program will work well with a child that has been doing Abeka K5? Will she move over easily?

Kerri,
Your child should be find moving to All About Reading, but you definitely need to use the placement tests for to decide which level would be best. http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-placement/

Also, we recommend having your child read the sample stories from the previous level online as a further confirmation. You want your child to be reading fluently with good comprehension before going to a higher level.
Level 1 sample story http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/content/samples/CobwebTheCat_Sample.pdf
Level 2 sample story http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/content/samples/AAR-L2-QueenBee-2ndEd-Sample.pdf
Level 3 sample story http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/content/samples/AAR-L3-Shipwreck-Sample.pdf
Level 4 sample story http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/content/samples/AAR-L4-Charlies-Sick-Day.pdf

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have any further questions.

Lenora D

says:

I have twin 8 yo and one is doing fine reading a little above grade level while the other is struggling to even conceptualize a sequence of sounds forming a word and that it doesn’t change when you see it in the next sentence. I would love to have a more organized system to teach from. I didn’t think it would be necessary as the first four all read easily by 7.

Samantha

says:

It looks like the rest of my post is missing. He has vision problems as well so I’m wondering how to tell if the struggle is vision related? Dyslexia? Both? Am I moving too fast through the lessons? He has about 5 lessons left in AAS 1 and is doing great. Any ideas Marie? Thank you!

Samantha,
I would say working with his provider to ensure that his vision problems are being fully address is the first order of business. If he needs glasses, or vision therapy, or whatever, that needs to be well in hand.

However, if he is struggling in any portion of the reading, slowing down is the best course. A Lesson every day or two is quite a fast pace for All About Reading; many find a Lesson every two to three days to be a better fit and some students need to work at an even slower pace. Since the stories are giving him problems, try the buddy reading I described above. You can also try rereading the Fluency Sheets in order to build up his fluency with the phrases and sentences.

We do move to smaller fonts and longer stories in each level because that slowly moves the student to being ready to read industry standard sized fonts and longer reading, such as chapter books. Stamina for longer reading has to be built up as well as the ability to read longer words. However, if you are concerned about the font size in regard to his vision issues, you could try using a page magnifier until his vision problems have been cared for. There are many styles of reading magnifiers available for under $10. On the other hand, a smaller font size might not be the problem, but rather that a smaller font allows for more words per page. If the amount of words on a page is a problem, such as causing him to lose his place or be discouraged, then you could use two pieces of paper or index cards to block out all but the line he is reading.

I hope this helps. Please if you have further questions do let us know.

Samantha

says:

We are loving AAR! After a couple different programs with no success we have success. I didn’t realize my son was dyslexic until we tried it and I started doing research. We struggled and with great success completed level 1 last year. This year we are working through level 2. My son will be 9 in a couple weeks and we have been moving through a lesson a day and sometimes 2 days. Should I slow down? He does wonderful at reading the word cards and is getting better with phrases but when reading the story it proves more difficult. I’ve noticed that the stories are longer now and the font is smaller. I’m sure there is good reasoning behind this.

Edie S

says:

Thanks for a peek into the life of a family that uses this program. It is always helpful to see how others teach.
I was encouraged to try some.

Melissa

says:

I have a 5yr old who is starting to read, so this program sounds great for him. Thank you for sharing this. :)

Kristi B

says:

I love the idea of “buddy reading”. I didn’t think about having my son re-read the stories for fluency practice. I just called him done after he read them once. This makes a lot of sense though. He’s just finishing level 1, so I will definitely try this with the rest of the levels. Thanks!

Yes, Kristi! Re-reading the reader stories for fluency practice makes for perfect review! Buddy reading helps with fluency too, so we hope you and your son love all of the above. Have fun with Level 2 as well!

Cynthia Trejo

says:

I love this. This is great to always remember.

Mary

says:

Thanks for the reminder to leave them wanting more! Works in showbiz and in educating!!

Ha, ha! I never thought of show business and education having this in common, but they do, don’t they? We can’t help but want our children to always want more! Cliffhangers are encouraged! :)

Dia

says:

We’re on level 2 now and after a rocky start are going nicely. My daughter was recently “caught” reading Green Eggs and Ham without me asking her to, and without needing help! Yay!

I’m sorry to hear about your rocky start, Dia. I’m thankful that after all of this, you had the joy of stumbling on your daughter reading Dr. Seuss!

Jennifer

says:

I enjoyed seeing how you adapted the lesson plans for your family!

Kate Milner

says:

Super helpful hearing your modifications! Good reminder why we homeschool in the first place. Thanks!

Amy Eckel

says:

I love the ideas and think my daughter would love this! :)

J. Bueckert

says:

Thank you.

Christine Weber

says:

This was helpful, thanks

Kristin Dickson

says:

This is very helpful to hear how another family is using all about reading in their homeschool. It was especially interesting to hear about the games in the Level 1 Ziggy supplement, as I ws not familiar with this product.

Deirdre Atkins

says:

Great ideas! Thanks!

Connie

says:

Good ideas of how to use this program!

Jessica Mashike

says:

I love how you use buddy reading to improve fluency and expression. I also like how you switch the pages read, I may need to try that with my daughter.

Tracy D.

says:

What great ideas! Thanks for sharing.

Jenny K.

says:

Great ideas in this post. My daughter also doesn’t like the fluency pages so we usually break them down & do so much at a time. She doesn’t get to overwhelmed this way & it goes much better. I have tried other reading programs but this is the one that has helped my kids the most.

Rachelle

says:

Enjoyed the post! Just have to say that I am thrilled my daughter no longer confuses the lower case b and d. This after only 8 lessons and we have spent 6 months with another curriculum! She loves this one! Thank you!

Michele Chronister

says:

Great to see this in action.

Leah Jager

says:

We love All About Reading! Its a perfect fit for my eldest who sometimes is not very motivated to read.

Gail Wall

says:

I love the all about spelling and reading programs! They are so flexable and adaptive!

I enjoyed seeing how this works in your home.

Debi Schuhow

says:

I’d like to see this work for someone who is just learning how to read.

Debi,
We are planning a whole series of “Real Moms, Real Kids” blog posts. I’ll pass along that you would like to see one focusing on teaching a very beginner reader. Thanks for the suggestion.

Caroline F

says:

Thank you for sharing your story.

Tracey

says:

Can you tell me about the “jail” at the top of your board? I’ve been wanting to make one for my son. We are currently on AAR 1.

Tracey,
The jail comes in All About Spelling Level 2 student packet and is used in the spelling program to throw “rule breakers” in jail. You can order one separately for $2.50 by calling the office at 715-477-1976.

Nancy T

says:

I also like the multi sensory approach of using the magnetic board, very helpful

Sarah M.

says:

It’s neat to see how this curriculum works, thank you! I have heard so many good things about it but have never actually seen it in action before.

Jenna

says:

I love seeing how others incorporate AAR into their day!

I love to see how other families use curriculum!

Brandy

says:

This made me even more interested in trying this program. It was good to see how someone uses it in their daily homeschool setting.

nicole rogers

says:

Great program!

Tara

says:

I love the magnetic board! We don’t have a lot of space but I would love to do a small one!

Cheryl W

says:

That was helpful! Had not thought about reading the story more than one time. And appreciated the idea of using Ziggy game with older children. Thank you!

Katie K

says:

Thank you for the information about this program.

Carmen Mathews

says:

I would like to try Level 4 of the reading level and your spelling system. I haven’t found a spelling program I really like, but this sounds like it would be helpful.

Carmen,
I’m sorry you haven’t found a spelling program you like. Let me know if you have any questions about how ours would work for you, we’d be glad to help. You mentioned starting in Level 4, so I just wanted to make sure you knew that our levels are not the same as grade levels. For reading, you could check the placement tests (http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-placement/).

For spelling, most people start in 1, but some are able to start in 2–here’s why (http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/which-level-should-my-older-student-start-with)

If you have any questions about placement, send us an email at (support@allaboutlearningpress.com) and we’d be glad to help!

Elizabeth L.

says:

Great ideas! Thanks for taking the tme to share!

Tamber

says:

I like the versatility of the programs. I began with All About Spelling Level 1 with my first grader. She is now in Level 5 and is a great speller. She gets bored of repetition, so we mix things up all the time. The program worked so well I invested in the reading program for her twin sisters. Now 6, thy are done with Level 1 and voraciously read everything.

Jan

says:

Great post with lots of information! Sounds easily followed without being too complicated.

Sabrina

says:

Thank you for this information. Its neat to see what others do with this program!

SPKarenO

says:

Great stuff here!!

Catherine

says:

Thanks! I really like the reading buddy idea. I can’t wait till our next lesson when we read a story. I like how you do the fluency sheets also. That’s where my daughter struggles too.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks, Catherine! I hope that the reading buddy idea does wonders for your daughter. Please tell us how this goes for her. Have fun!

Sharee

says:

Thanks for the great info! It’s helpful to see how other moms are using things to their advantage and how you could potentially use them with your kids.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Sharee!

Judith Martinez

says:

These are really great ideas! I love the buddy reading idea.

Brittany M

says:

I think it’s a great idea to set a time limit before she can get frustrated with what she is learning. This is what I am having trouble with, with my son. We love to do “buddy” reading at our home also. My son loves that he doesn’t feel so under pressure to try and do it by himself. I love getting different tips from other parents.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Brittany, I’m glad to hear that the tip on setting a time limit was helpful for you. It’s great to get tips from other homeschooling moms!

Angela B.

says:

Great information, my main take away is to stick with the time-limit before frustration takes over. This has encouraged me that there is something that could help my reluctant reader.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Angela, I’m glad that you feel encouraged after reading this blog post. We want you to feel encouraged. Please let us if you need additional help for your reluctant reader! support@allaboutlearningpress.com

Jenni Jones

says:

This would be so great for my 4yo guy who’s starting to read! Level 1 would be perfect for him!

Janet Beckwith

says:

Sorry, I think I posted this instead of sending it to Marie. Hope she receives it anyway and can respond.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

We’ve received your comment, Janet! Help is on the way! (Expect to get an email from us shortly!)

Janet Beckwith

says:

Hello Marie,
I’ve been looking at your “reading” and “spelling” online for a couple of years. We’re raising and homeschooling a 14 y o grandson. I’ve tried numerous programs trying to fill in the blanks that he missed at a younger age. His 2nd thru 4th grade was sporadic at least. He missed a year of school and was in several different school systems over a 2 year period.
I said all this b/c I believe this has severely affected his spelling and reading. He knows his single letter phonics, but missed many blends and syllables. I’m guessing he’s at a 3rd to 4th grade level in reading and still sounding out words slowly. He also seems to transpose some of the letters while reading and writing.
So my question is: Would your programs benefit him at his age and if so, how would I know where to start him? He’s very smart and does 7th grade level work, but very time consuming as his reading level holds him back. He still needs me for most everything because of this.
I await your reply. Thank you,
janet beckwith

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Janet,

I’m sorry your grandson is struggling with reading. You are doing a difficult job, homeschooling a teenage grandson—he is blessed to have you in his life!

Many teens and even adults have used AAR and AAS, and are doing well, so we have seen success for older students. The programs are perfect for filling in gaps in student’s understanding. I would start with reading, and add in spelling later, unless he places in Level 2 or higher and is anxious to work on spelling—I’ll post reading placement information below. The blog limits the number of links in a comment, so I’ll email you a copy of this so that you can have all of the links.

Both All About Reading and All About Spelling are Orton-Gillingham based. Marie is a member of the International Dyslexia Association, and was an instructor for the graduate level courses in Orton-Gillingham Literacy Training offered through Nicolet College in Rhinelander, Wisconsin for 3 years. If you haven’t had a chance to watch their story about her son’s struggles, you may want to check that out: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/about

Quite amazing!

Here is what Marie recommends when tutoring teens:

– Follow the new-concept lessons in the Teacher’s Manual, which include flashcard review, “Change the Word,” Activity Sheets, Fluency Practice, and reading aloud to your student. Approximately every other lesson is a “new concept” lesson, and every other lesson is a “read a story” lesson.

– In the Activity Book, you can skip the activities that your grandson might think are too young, but some of the activities in the upper levels would be age-appropriate–you can evaluate as you go. They are there to provide fun review activities for those that would need and enjoy them. As we state in the Teacher’s Manual, the activity sheets aren’t necessary for older learners; however, the fluency pages in the activity book will be very helpful.

– Marie and many tutors include the readers, too. The Level 2 readers have simple stories, but we took care to make sure the pictures aren’t baby-ish. With regard to the Level 1 readers, sometimes it depends on the student. We’ve talked to tutors of adults, and the adult students are so happy to be able to read a story that they are thrilled to read the Level 1 readers. They don’t mind the content. But if you are dealing with a “cool” teen who needs work in Level 1, you might want to stick with the fluency pages and wait until you get to the Level 2 readers.

You mentioned that he transposes letters when reading and writing. There can be a few reasons for this, such as auditory processing struggles, visual processing issues, working memory issues and so on. One thing you can do when he misreads a word is to show him a simple blending procedure–check this article on word-guessing to see an example. AAS similarly includes segmenting activities to make sure kids can hear each sound in a word and gradually learn to write longer and longer words. Both programs include extensive syllable instruction.

As far as placement goes, you can use the placement tests for AAR to decide which level would be best. The levels are not according to grade level— All About Reading groups words in a logical manner based on similar rules or patterns regardless of their supposed grade level, which allows students to progress quickly and confidently. Here are some examples of concepts and words covered for each level, which might help you decide which placement test to try first. It sounds like level 2 or 3 might have new content for him, but see what you think (and feel free to email with more questions—I’m happy to help with placement):

Level 2 covers 3-letter blends; two-syllable words with open and closed syllables – hotel; vowel-consonant-E pattern words; VCE syllable combined with closed syllables – reptile; contractions; r-controlled words – her, car, and corn; soft c and g – face, page; past tense – hugged; vowel teams oi, oy, au, aw, ou, ow, oe, and ee; y in shy; wh in wheel; i and o can be long before two consonants (ex: ild, old, ost) – most; silent e after u or v – have; and the third sound of a – all. It includes two and three syllable words such as pullover, outnumber, sandpaper, saucepan, and invoice, etc…

Level 3 covers prefixes and suffixes; syllable division rules for reading multisyllable words (these start in AAR 2 and are continued in Level 3); many literary terms like alliteration, similes, personification; words containing the new phonograms, such as paint, play, boat, third, purple, soon, mean, light, match, budge, flew, wrong, know, sleigh, toe, and action; words with the “pickle” syllable such as bubble and table; and 2-5 syllable words such as armadillo, auction, banquet, celebration, butterscotch, chimpanzee, contraption, examination, education, government, hibernation, instruments, objection, mildew, migration, safekeeping, paperweight, semicircle, uneventful, wristwatch, spectacles, thermometer, and so on.

Level 4 is the final level of the reading program. At the end of Level 4, students have the phonics and word attack skills necessary to sound out high school level words, though they may not know the meaning of all higher level words.(Word attack skills include things like dividing words into syllables, making analogies to other words, sounding out the word with the accent on different word parts, recognizing affixes, etc…)

Examples of some of the harder words covered in Level 4 include: acquaintance, aphid, beneficial, boutique, bronchial, campaign, chameleon, chauffeur, consignment, crochet, cuisine, cylinder, deficient, delectable, distraught, entree, epilogue, etiquette, facial, ferocious, glisten, gnashed, gourmet, graduation, guinea, Herculean, heroism, horticulture, hygiene, incompatible, isle, lariat, lasagna, limousine, magnificence, mayonnaise, malicious, meringue, mustache, neighborhood, nuisance, ocelot, onslaught, oregano, pendulum, perceptible, picturesque, plausible, premiere, prioritize, questionnaire, reassign, routine, sanitize, saute, situation, solstice, souvenir, specimen, spectacular, teleportation, temperament, tortilla, unveiled, vogue, warthog, zucchini.

Here are the All About Reading samples and scope and sequence links so you can see samples of each level.

As another way to verify placement, we recommend having your grandson read the sample stories from the previous level online as a further confirmation. You want your student to be reading fluently with good comprehension before going to a higher level.
Level 1 sample story
Level 2 sample story
Level 3 sample story
Level 4 sample story
If there is a mix of easier and harder material in a level for him, or if he balks at placement—I find it helps some kids understand if you compare to something like a video game or swimming lessons. Even though level 1 of a game or of lessons is easy to do, that doesn’t mean you should jump ahead to level 10. But it does mean that you can go quickly through the easier lessons, learning what you need to know so that when you DO get to the higher levels, you aren’t overwhelmed by having to learn too much at once.

I know how frustrating it is to try numerous programs and not see the results you are looking for. We have a 1-year guarantee for just that reason—Marie never wants to see anyone stuck with a program that just isn’t working for them.

We also provide lifetime support for all of our programs—we really want to see students succeed.

I know this is long, but I hope this helps as you consider what might be best for your grandson. Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Kevin

says:

I think this would help us with our children during the summer months.

Cyrus Woo

says:

I appreciate the systematic approach to reading in the homeschool context.

Marsha

says:

This would help my daughter a lot during the summer months being home on summer vacation. She is in reading class now in school and I’m always looking for ideas and books to help her extra at home! Thanks!

steph j

says:

I love the way you have the kids play a review game. Having them learn but making it fun is great. Thanks for the giveaway.

Deanna

says:

These are great ideas! Thanks for posting them!

Niki P

says:

Reading this post has made me want to try this product even more! Thanks for the great giveaway!

Melissa E.

says:

Thank you, posts like this are helpful as I determine which curriculum is the best fit for my family!

Mabel

says:

I loved seeing how someone else uses AAR in their home. We love the program here. Thanks for some new ideas.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Mabel!

Laura Stephenson

says:

This post has been very helpful, with a lot of great ideas. My child is getting the concepts but is struggling with the reading portion. I think we will try to incorporate some of these ideas into our reading lessons!

Paige L.

says:

As a former kindergarten teacher, I know how difficult it can be to teach kids to read, so I assumed I’d follow the same progression with my own children. After starting AAR Level I with my son, I was absolutely stunned by how quickly and efficiently he learned to read! I L.O.V.E. this program!

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Paige,

I’m so glad to hear how well AAR is working for your son! Enjoy!

Kate

says:

Great ideas!! Thanks!!

Cassandra

says:

These are great ideas! I especially like the 2-3 minute review, as I think that it would be better for any subject… quick review, where are we having trouble… work on those concepts … awesome :)

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks, Cassandra! Good point about using the 2-3 minute review for any subject. It really keep concepts fresh in students’ minds without overwhelming them.

Amanda Holley

says:

I like the way she has structured the lessons and I really like the buddy reading concept.

Jennifer Mathesz

says:

I like the structure. Lil 20 min lessons are enuf and that time frame will keep them interested.

Amanda

says:

Thanks!

Amanda

says:

Thanks for the great article. I am looking to purchase All About Reading 2 as I’ve heard so many good things about your program. This is nice to see a real life example of how to use it.

Jess

says:

All about Reading has been a real blessing to our family. It was the perfect help for our struggling reader.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Aww… That means a lot to us, Jess. I’m overjoyed to hear that our curriculum has been a blessing for your household.

Kara

says:

Thanks for the great ideas!

Cheryl

says:

I used a similar approach to breaking up lessons. My son really struggled with fluency. In fact at the beginning of this school year, I was getting a little worried about his slow progress. I am pleased to say that we stuck with the AAR program, and I am now seeing tremendous results. He took a huge leap forward in reading in the past couple of months and now is speeding through AAR Level 3. I literally can’t go fast enough for him as he often already knows the phonograms before we get to them. Just a few months ago he was still sounding out cvc words one at a time. He just had his 8th birthday. Now he reads the stories in the Level 3 reader ahead of time on his own for fun! I am so pleased with this program. Patience and consistency with this program paid off! I wholeheartedly agree with the not pushing to the point of frustration. Just keep working slowly and when your child is ready they will take off!

Thank you, Cheryl! I know slow and steady will get my daughter reading well, but it does get discouraging at times. It’s actually been a couple months since I wrote this post, and Belle is starting to become more fluent, although the progress is still slow.

Cheryn

says:

I have a 6 y.o. That just wants to read books, not work through new concepts, and an almost 4 y.o. that is very interested in spelling everything he sees, and being read to a lot. Maybe the more hands on approach will keep them each interested to progress through the steps for success and growing love of reading.

Well, if you have a kid that only wants to do one thing there are a whole lot worse things than reading books :D.

Check out the Freebies category of our blog for lots of different hands-on ideas and downloads to try out http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/category/freebies/

Ashley W

says:

I love that Belle’s lesson is short and sweet. I need to remember this for my two girls. Thanks for the reminder to k.i.s.s.!

K.C.

says:

AAR is one of those programs that I keep hearing about, but have never actually looked at — all those pieces and parts have intimidated me! Thank you for showing me that it’s not all that scary :)

Oh, nothing scary about it! We have all the those parts and pieces to make it easier, less work for you.

Rhonda

says:

We started our son in the Pre-reading level this year, and it is working very well. I plan on moving to Level One next year. It was great to see a real family in action using All About Reading. Thanks for the great information!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Rhonda! I’m glad to hear that Pre-reading is working well for your son. Enjoy Level 1!

Leanne

says:

Thank you so much- I have been using a hodgepodge of reading activities for my daughter, and just bought Level 2 to use with her next year. I have been having a hard time envisioning what it actually looks like spread across a typical week and this blog post came at a perfect time as I have been trying to think through how I want it to work. I want to keep it light and fun, and this gave me many ideas for how to do that!

Lesley Myers

says:

Thanks so much! My 6 year old is currently doing AAR level 1 and having a hard time with fluency too. She can sound out the words on the cards, with about 15 she easily reads with out sounding them out. She can get so frustrated with all the sounding out of words. So I have a question, if you have a large number of cards that your child cannot read fluently, do just keep going through the lessons or just stop and practice these words? I don’t want to keep adding more and more cards if it is going to make it harder for her. She does get frustrated and tired so I know when to stop. I will try several of the suggestions here, just really unsure if I should keep adding new content. Any advice appreciated! We love your programs, my oldest is finally learning to spell with AAS!

Lesley,
You and she are doing fine. Do not expect perfection before moving on. Reaching the goal of fluent reading will be a gradual process over many lessons. Students may need to read a word thirty times before they can read it fluently, without having to sound it out.

The Word Cards allow you to track what has been mastered and what still needs work. Keep word cards in review until she can read them easily, without needing to sound them out. As you mentioned, the word cards do stack up and the stack gets pretty thick as you go. This is okay. Just spend 2 to 3 minutes having her read through the cards, and then stop and go onto your lesson. The next day you’ll pick up the stack where she left off and read for another 2 to 3 minutes.

As you are working toward fluency do take the Lessons slowly and review a lot, but still move forward into new Lessons with new content. Fluency will come with time. Keep up the good work.

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Julie VanderWeide

says:

Thank you for sharing how you use All About Reading. I have been thinking about using this for a while now and this was a good intro.

Kelly

says:

I love seeing a sneak peek into other homeschoolers days and seeing how they adapt programs to make them work for their kids – thanks!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Happy to provide a sneak peek, Kelly! I’m glad you enjoyed it! More are planned for upcoming months!

I really enjoyed this peek inside your days! Very instructive. Thank you. :D

Christie

says:

It’s always great to hear how others use the program. Thanks for sharing!

Rebecca

says:

Buddy reading alternate pages multiple times is GENIUS. Fluency is our big monster too. This is great. Thanks.

Lida

says:

I like keeping our lesson time short and fun!

Jennifer

says:

Thanks for sharing a peek into how you use the program.

Grace

says:

Love to see other users sharing their stories.

Laura

says:

Great ideas. Thanks for sharing.

Andrea

says:

This was an encouraging read to know that we are on the right path! My daughter is also struggling with fluency so it was a helpful read for me, thanks for posting!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Hi Andrea! Be sure to see this blog post as well: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/5-tips-for-practice-sheets/ . It contains more ideas for improving fluency with the Practice Sheets.

Amanda S

says:

I love how she shortened things for her daughter into chunks of learning that would be more manageable for her.

Heather

says:

I love the buddy reading strategy mentioned here!

Annmarie

says:

I liked how Belle reads through her word cards for just a few minutes a day for review. Then she easily can pick up where she left off in the stack the next day!

Bethel

says:

I am excited to use the All about Reading Level 1 and was so happy to see there is a supplemental book with Ziggy activities. My girls (4 & 2) just adore that zebra and love when he comes out. I will have to get the supplemental book to go with the curriculum.

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Ha, ha! It’s nice to know that Ziggy has been such a big hit in your household. More importantly though, I’m glad he’s made everything so much fun for your girls. (I hope you enjoy all the Ziggy activities yet to come!)

Ginger

says:

I have never used your products, but would like to try them. Hope I win:)

Becky

says:

Loved level 1 All Abouy Reading and looking fwd to level 2 with my 1st grader next yr. Would love to try All About Spelling too!

Georgette H

says:

I like the idea of combining review for all kiddos in a shared game. I hope to remember this for the future as my kiddos get older!

Aaron Schofield

says:

Saving activity pieces for later use is a great idea, I would love to see pictures of this. Ideas on how to re-use sheets where they glue the cut pieces on would be helpful too. We are also looking for ways of making lessons more portable, as we are short on wall space and the pieces frequently fall and/or get lost as we move them around. An app or even (gasp) a binder-friendly arrangement would be ideal.

Rebecca

says:

I’m sure you’re doing this already re portable board/tiles – and I think an app would be great! – but here’s what we do: I keep the tiles separated by type in those plastic sandwich baggies (i.e. suffixes in one bag, vowel teams in another, double alphabet in another, etc.) and put them all in a large pencil case along with dry erase markers. This makes it a lot faster to set up a board when we need it. We use both a full-size magnetic white board on the dining room table or upstairs on the rug and we just lean it up between the filing cabinet and sideboard when done, as well as a small individual-size whiteboard. If I see we’re only tiling a few words, I’ll go the extra step and pull out what I need from my baggies and we use the small whiteboard. It’s a little extra work but less than setting up a whole board. I have also grabbed the pencil case, small whiteboard, and books and gone wherever with it, although we do tend to do most of our spelling at home.

Aaron,

We are working on a letter tile app. We don’t have an estimated release date yet, but we’ll be sure to announce it on Facebook, our blog, and through our email newsletter when we do.

In the meantime, you can look into Whizzimo (http://whizzimo.com/). Through the settings you can change the tile colors to match our tiles. It’s not an exact match for our tiles, but all the basics are the same.

As for reusing the activities, I don’t have my daughter actually glue them. She just lays the pieces down on the page, and when she’s done we paperclip them all together and toss them in a large envelope. I’m sure there’s a more organized way to do it, but I haven’t found it yet.

I hope this helps!

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Aaron,

Here are some organizational pictures and ideas for you:

Here’s one for organizing/reusing activities in AAR: http://ichoosejoy.org/2014/11/07/how-to-set-up-an-all-about-readingspelling-notebook/

A current FB discussion on organizing materials: https://www.facebook.com/allaboutlearningpress/posts/824438404297648

A previous FB discussion with ideas for tiles: https://www.facebook.com/allaboutlearningpress/posts/806462239428598 (you may have to click “more replies” at the bottom to see some fold-out options for tile boards)

I hope this helps!

I am a reading and math intervention teacher at a Christian school part time. I home school my two boys. I sure run into a lot of kids that have trouble spelling. I’ve recently started a new program that I developed called “Renaissance Learning.” I’m finally seeing success!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I’m sorry to hear that you’ve encountered a lot of kids who struggle with spelling, but I’m glad to hear of your success too! Congratulations, Renee! I’m very happy for you.

Abigail W

says:

The Buddy Reading ought to be a really big help for my oldest son, who is learning to read now. I also appreciate seeing how another mom tackles review, practice, and introducing new concepts. This is quite similar to how we handle all three, but this is a good reminder to focus more on the multi-sensory elements. Thanks for sharing, Robin!

Judy

says:

There were many great ideas in this post. Thanks!

Sarah Malone

says:

We are not familiar worth the All About Spelling, but our experience with All About Reading has been great! The stories are sometimes educational and always catchy! We just finished What Am I with my five year old. He loves reading the story to his friends to see if they can guess the riddles! Fun!

Sarah Malone

says:

**with

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I’m glad to hear that your son likes the story “What Am I?”! Thanks for sharing!

Shannon Hall

says:

Love reading how curriculum is used in homes.

Bethany

says:

I love how easy it is to adapt the lessons as each family needs. My daughter loves the stories and finds them much easier than the fluency sheets, so those lessons go much more quickly for us. Plus when there is a story involved she wants to stay at the lesson longer.

Laura Spellmeyer

says:

It was interesting to see how the program can be adapted as needed. I am considering using All About Reading and All About Spelling with my daughter as well.

Erica D

says:

It’s nice to see how AAR can be implemented. We’re looking to switch phonics programs, and it’s nice to see the program in action.

Karen

says:

We’ve been an All About… Family for years. I LOVE your products – they truly work. For my son, who is 6, he just loves doing both All About Spelling 1 and All About Reading – finished both Pre-Reading and Level 2 (skipped Level 1 because he was really so fluently already and is a natural decoder.) We are ready to start Level 3 and we’ve just started All About Spelling 1 now. For a boy who loves to move stuff around… the tiles and games are PERFECT. Just long enough to be thorough, but not too long to get tedious and lose interest. We use the Adventures with Ziggy games too for use as review. Ziggy is a part of our family. ;) We take turns sometimes too – he’ll read a line, and alternates with me. He seems to like doing that. Sometimes he’ll just keep going even when it’s my time and I just happily keep quiet and let him run with it. After 2 years of reading, I thought the Spelling might be boring – but no. He loves the familiar format and enjoys it just as much. Thank you for all you do!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thank you for sharing all of these details, Karen! I’m glad to hear that AAR and AAS have worked so well for your very active boy!!!

Kim

says:

I enjoyed reading this because I’ve been thinking about including All About Reading into our curriculum and was wondering what a day using it looked like. I have a 5th grader who has difficulty with comprehension.

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Kim,

You might find this article on how we address comprehension helpful: http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com/reading-comprehension

Please let us know if you have any questions.

Kimberly

says:

Thank you for sharing! This will be very helpful to us as we begin our new adventure using AAR as our reading curriculum. :)

Holly

says:

Thank you for supplying some free samples of your program. It looks like this program may be the answer I have been looking for.

Wendy

says:

I have waited for so long to see a well laid out program using the Orton-Gillingham method! I can’t believe it… thanks to you, one exists! Thank you so much for taking the time to create this wonderful program!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thank you, Wendy. I wanted a well-laid out, Orton-Gillingham based program just as badly as you did. I’m thankful it was worth the wait!

Elizabeth

says:

It’s nice see to a concrete example of the program being used and adapted for an individual family. Thanks for sharing!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome, Elizabeth! We have more posts in this “Real Mom, Real Kids” series coming up in the next few weeks. I love seeing how families implement AAR and AAS!

kk

says:

We think your materials are great!

Katie

says:

This looks like a very consistent and encouraging program!

Keely

says:

We love AAR. I did AAR pre level 1 with my son when he was 3-4 yrs old, and he loved it. We switched to a different program for K and his progress faltered and ground to a halt. Mid-year I stopped the other program to regroup and ordered AAR level 1; now, three months later – my son is reading wonderfully, on level or higher, and although I won’t lie and say he loves the fluency sheets, we are no longer having the tears and tantrums that marked our time with competing programs. The readers that come with AAR are truly beautiful books worthy of a permanent spot on our bookshelf. They are the best readers and highest quality stories of any I have seen. The games and activities are multi sensory. My son is a wiggly social type, but I can see this program working with many personalities. It is highly adaptable.
We will never leave this amazing program again. I am not a rep for them or anything, just an average homeschooling mom who is so grateful to have found this. It has made all the difference in our homeschool day. Worth EVERY penny! Looking forward to AAR level 2 and AAS level 1 for 1st grade next year. Will use the entire program again with my next two children :)!

Keely,
This is great. We’re so glad our program is working so well for you and your son! Thanks for sharing.

Marcia

says:

Thank you for sharing your pictures and ideas! Loved it!

Julie D

says:

I’m Looking forward to starting this program with my children!

Lara M

says:

I love the timer idea! My kinder boy has a short attention span!

Olivia Sudduth

says:

Love how you have shown a picture of what is possible and it encourages us to keep up the task of reading with our children.

Kelly

says:

This was very helpful. Thank you!

Kayla

says:

Thank you for allowing us into your home Robin! I have a struggling reader who is the exact same age as Belle. It is comforting to know that you are on Level 2 and that I am not alone. Thank you for the inspiration.

You’re welcome in my home (as long as you let me clean first :D).

I know it can be discouraging to have a struggling reader, and know how encouraging it can be to hear that others have struggled and succeeded. Keep up the great work!

Julie

says:

I have been homeschooling many years and soooo wish I had found All About Spelling (and Reading) before. My younger three (of seven) are benefitting!

Heather

says:

Thanks for the great ideas!

Doris Villeneuve

says:

Thanks for this program. It has short lessons which creates a desire to learn.
An excellent resource.

Michele Peyton

says:

I have been considering this for my daughter for next year! Thank you so much for posting these ideas, it really helps me in choosing what will work best for my family!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

You’re so welcome! If you have any other questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at support@allaboutlearningpress.com.

Danise

says:

My daughter has dyslexia which can make reading lessons feel like torture. Thank you for reminding me on “short and sweet” lessons. It is so easy to get caught up with finishing lessons instead of working to their needs and strengths.

Darnetta

says:

Great ideas!

Kathy

says:

I love the idea of using the game to review all different levels at the same time. And I agree, they will tolerate it longer when you make it fun!

Kylie

says:

Great ideas! My daughter also struggles with fluency and there’s often yelling. I’ve been doing the fluency on its own day but breaking it up may actually be better for her! Thanks!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Breaking the fluency practice into smaller chunks should be really helpful for your daughter. Here is a blog post that contains more ideas for making fluency practice more palatable: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/5-tips-for-practice-sheets/

Carla

says:

I love the short lessons! We taught my first daughter to read before we discovered All About Learning and it took some very painful early lessons to learn how important a short reading lesson is!

Marcy

says:

Great idea to switch off pages with the buddy reading! I will have to try that!

Deana

says:

Thanks for sharing how you use this program with your child. This is very helpful.

Tracey M

says:

I love hearing from a real family what they are doing and some of the neat things they created. Very creative to have a game activity. Thanks for sharing!

Christie

says:

Wonderful job Robin! I never got the chance to order the games for level 1…good to know thry can easily be adapted to each level. My son struggles with fluency also and never looks forward to the fluency pages, but it does make a huge difference. We do the buddy system with stories and fluency pages too. I read and highlight a row and my son reads and highlights a row. :) My son is in first grade and we have completed level 1 and are near the middle of level 2. I wish I learned to read and spell this way when I was a child.

Thank you, Christie. Interesting thought on buddy reading the fluency pages. I’ll have to give that try.

Rebecca

says:

I have tried several reading programs with my 10 year old. None worked. This program is amazing! We noticed huge results within the first week! I would definitely recommend this program to anyone that has a struggling reader. The fluency sheets are a MUST, as they build confidence!

Merry at AALP

says:

That’s wonderful, Rebecca, I’m so excited for you and your 10 year-old!

Kathy

says:

Good ideas.

Tammy Jones

says:

Great ideas! Thanks for sharing.

Katherine

says:

Great tips! Thanks.

Julie

says:

We love all about reading and I used pre-reading with my 3 year old and Level 1 with my 4 year old this school year

Karen

says:

I enjoyed seeing how you used this on a daily basis. Thinking about getting this for next school year.

Christine Rodas

says:

Lots of helpful tips and ideas! Thank you so much!

rachel l

says:

We are halfway through level 2 with my 7 y/o 1st grader. I am learning all the rules I never knew! We got level 1 with our IEW purchase pf the PAL program. I can see why they send AAS with that program. They really go hand in hand.

Diana

says:

This program looks fantastic! I would love to try this program with my boys!

Raquel

says:

this is our first year homeschooling and love it! My daughter is finishing 2nd grade and struggles with spelling. Would love to win all about spelling curriculum!

rebeccca harris

says:

We love all about reading and can’t wait to try aas.

Clara

says:

Love the multi-sensory, fun yet in-depth program!

Stacy

says:

Love this program!

Harmony

says:

Thanks for an example of how your day works. We are just starting this program and I’m still figuring out how to make it work for us. I can see improvement in my daughters spelling already even though we are only on level one and she knows how to do these basics.

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Harmony,

Let us know if you have any questions along the way. We’d be happy to help.

Kassi

says:

I love your magnetic board! So much room. I like that they can stand up to use it. This is such a fun program.

kelly

says:

would love to try this!

Ashleigh

says:

Reading such a huge integral part of a child’s life. Here in South Africa, the education standards decline on a yearly basis due to children not reading. Grade 12’s reading and spelling level matches Grade 8 or lower competency. Programs like these make such a huge difference, not only in the child’s life, but the parents as well.

Bridget

says:

Love this!

Shaina

says:

This seems very easy to follow. It still seems overwhelming to me also as a new homeschooling mom.

Merry at AALP

says:

Hi Shaina,

Please know that we’re always here to help! We provide lifetime support for all of our programs, so feel free to email, call, send a facebook message, ask a question here on our blog or on our forum–whatever works best for you.

Pam

says:

love this program. it is so easy to use.

tearra leger

says:

I love this program! It has helped my son who has a slow processing speed finally catch on to reading & spelling!

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