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Teaching Reading and Spelling to Multiple Kids

“I have three kids in three different levels. Will your program work for me?”

It’s a question that our customer service reps have heard many times before. Because All About Reading and All About Spelling are programs that require active instruction, some parents assume that if they have more than one child, these programs won’t work for them.

Here are some of the concerns raised by parents:

  • Will it take too long to teach all my children?
  • How will I keep my other kids busy?
  • How will I keep everything organized?

Of course, we could answer all these questions ourselves, but sometimes parents would rather hear answers from “the trenches,” from real moms who use AAR and AAS in their own homes. We get that.

So here are some answers from a few moms who shared their thoughts about teaching reading and spelling to multiple children.

How Do You Handle Daily Lessons?

When it comes to juggling the programs with her children, Kristen from Teaching Stars says…

I hear from folks who think it would be too hard to juggle these programs for multiple children in their home, and I want to show you that not only is it possible, it’s extremely rewarding.

Both All About Reading and All About Spelling are scripted curricula, which means they are parent-intensive. It’s not the sort of curricula where you just throw a workbook at your kid and hope it sticks. This requires active parent participation. But just because these resources are parent-intensive doesn’t mean they take tons of time to plan or prepare. In fact, I personally take little to no time to prepare. Yes, you heard me correctly.

Most days I just take a minute or two to preview the lesson prior to starting and to make sure I have any coordinated activity pages or new letter tiles if needed. But really, the resources are written so you can just pop it open and go.


Reading and spelling books for multiple kids on a book shelf

Kristen also shared her thoughts about using an older sibling as a teacher’s helper.

I’m always amazed at how happily my girls volunteer to help me teach their siblings. They enjoy assuming the role of teacher’s helper, at the same time reinforcing their own learning. For example, Mira really struggled with rhyming. When Stella had her first rhyming lesson, I realized I could ask big sister for her help in directing the lesson while surreptitiously giving her the opportunity to review a challenging skillthe old “two birds, one stone” approach.

Stella recently started the All About Reading program, and yesterday Mira and Stella ran up to me after lunch and asked if they could pull out Ziggy (our friendly zebra puppet) to do a lesson. I told them I would love to but I didn’t have time to teach just then.

Mira responded, “Oh don’t worry. I can teach.”


Older child teaching younger with Ziggy the zebra puppet.

Robin (one of our awesome customer service reps) lets her older kids help teach the younger ones, too!

If you have older children who work well with your younger children, you can enlist their help. This can be helpful if you have an older student who needs to review rules. Generally, when we teach something, we learn it more thoroughly. So with this scenario, both children benefit!

Elaine from Humble Dwelling teaches five kids! Here are her thoughts.

How do I teach five kids all these lessons without getting overwhelmed? First, we do spelling only on Fridays. Each lesson takes about 20 minutes max. I do verbally quiz them through the week, sometimes even at the dinner table, to see what rules they can remember or how to spell a particular word. Also, to save me some time, Liam and Jack do spelling lessons together.

Reading is done twice a week. Again, these lessons are only about 20 minutes, including the fun activities that go with each one.

So, between spelling and reading for five children, I spend about two and a half hours per week teaching. While that may seem like a short time for teaching reading and spelling, this program is really effective. All my children are strong readers and spellers, and I owe it to All About Learning Press!


2 children playing a reading game together.

Here’s what Lisa from The Happy Homeschool Mom had to say about combining children in one level.

All About Reading is based on ability rather than grade level, so if you have children that are very close in ability you can combine them. You can find placement tests here.

My eight-year-old and ten-year-old are very close in reading ability, so we have always done reading and spelling together. Doing their reading lessons together has not only made things easier on me, but it encourages them as well and they enjoy doing the activities together. (Learn more about combining children in one level of All About Reading or All About Spelling in this post.)

If we have word cards to review, the boys take turns reading the cards. Each boy reads five cards. Then I build words on our small board and they take turns reading the words that I build. Then the next day they switch and read the others. They do the same with the fluency practice. The first day they each read half of the sentences and the next day they switch and read the other words and sentences.

And they play the games together. It’s their favorite part!

Robin has a great idea about time management.

Be sure to keep transition times between kids down to a minimum. I stack everyone’s spelling and reading materials on our school table and have each child come to me when it’s their turn. I let my kids know that I won’t wait for them to finish what they are doing when it is their turn for reading or spelling. I usually try to give each child a five-minute warning to help ensure that they’ll be ready.

You’ll want to spend about 15 minutes per day on your reading and spelling lessons. If you can’t finish a whole “lesson” in 15 minutes, that’s fine! Just pick up where you left off the next day.

How Do You Keep the Other Kids Busy?

Ticia from Adventures in Mommydom has a couple of wonderful ideas for keeping the other kids occupied.

In my house, reading is a 1:1 class ratio. Yes, I’m teaching reading to multiple kids, but I’m doing it one child at a time. We have a set rotation and different kids go first each day.

Some of my favorite techniques for keeping the other kids occupied:

Buddy reading with a sibling

  • provides extra reading practice
  • helps the weaker reader because the stronger reader will correct and help them
  • helps the stronger reader by allowing them to be the teacher

Independent reading

  • encourages enjoyment of reading
  • provides practice in reading silently (which my kids are still working on)
  • increases concentration skills while others are making noise (not that this is a problem in my house)

Boy in a chair reading independently.

Robin has some ideas on occupying other siblings, too.

Older children who can work independently can be doing “school things” like handwriting and math while Mom is teaching another child. You may need to get a bit creative with your younger children. Some ideas include “projects” like cutting up magazines, assigning an older child to help them with a subject or read to them, assigned chores, independent reading, or quiet playtime.

And Kristen shared a great idea about avoiding interruptions.

In order to avoid constant interruptions during big sister’s lesson, I place my younger children on their laptops where they play educational games that supplement their own reading lessons.

How Do You Organize AAR and AAS?

Ticia has a simple but effective way of keeping track of where her kids are in their lessons.

Despite the fact that my boys are twins, my kids are at three different levels in reading. One son is almost done with All About Reading Level 2, while his brother and sister are at different spots in that same one.

The first step is to have your reading program organized. First, I’ve got super official bookmarks in the place of each child’s lesson. They may look like scraps of paper to the casual observer, but these are my official “where you’re at” papers. To help me gauge their mastery of the lesson, I move the bookmark to their current place in the lesson to give me an idea of how many more days I think they might need to practice.

Elaine has a few organization tips as well.

All About Reading comes with phonogram cards and word cards. Using the cards that come with both AAR and AAS is a big help with having those sounds stick in the kids’ brains! I store all of our flashcards in the super sturdy little boxes that come with the interactive kits. Liam’s is still kicking after five years!

All About Reading and All About Spelling review boxes for several children

I keep all the teacher’s manuals, student workbooks, and readers in one spot for easy access. Some days I prepare ahead, but honestly most days I don’t have time to do so. The teacher’s manuals are scripted and very easy to follow, so not much extra preparation is needed. That is a HUGE help for me!

And finally, sticker charts! These charts help me remember what lesson each of my children are on every day. So simple, yet so effective!


Progress charts showing progress for multiple students.

What about organizing all those letter tiles? Lisa has a good system.

I have two different boards we use for All About Reading. We have a big board that hangs on the wall and holds all the letter tiles. We also have a small one that sits on the table we use for our lessons. Both boards have the alphabet on them, and I pull extra tiles off the big board to use on the small board during lessons.

Speaking of letter tiles, Kristen weighed in on this question, too.

The use of magnetic letter tiles is a staple of the All About Reading and All About Spelling lessons. I keep all our tiles on one large board. My younger children focus on just the vowel and consonant tiles while my oldest uses the complete set in her lessons. So far, this hasn’t overwhelmed my younger kids and it saves me time by not forcing me to remove and replace different sets of tiles for each child.


Image of child spelling a word with letter tiles.

The Bottom Line for Teaching AAR and AAS to Multiple Kids

  • All About Reading and All About Spelling are scripted programs that require very little daily prep for the teacher.
  • Children of similar abilities can easily be combined and taught together.
  • A well-organized area for teaching reading and spelling will help your homeschool days run more efficiently.
  • Teaching multiple children will not look the same for every family. It’s important that you create a system that works for your family!

Are you teaching reading and spelling to multiple children? Do you have any ideas to share? Please let us know in the comments below!

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Leave a Comment

Jo Ann Balisan

says:

for my little brothers 💕

Amity Johnson

says:

I have been looking at all about reading and spelling for a while now

I’m excited to learn about All About Spelling as we are looking for an exciting new spelling program to implement in our curriculum.

lindsey

says:

such great tips

Carissa

says:

Thank you for the information regarding fluency solutions.

Kristen

says:

My kids and I love all about reading and all about spelling!

Andrea

says:

Great tips on teaching multiple kids!

Amy Bratteli

says:

Thanks for posting this! I’m very interested in All About Spelling

JENNIFER CHANDLER

says:

Wow! This is such a great post about teaching multiple children, which is the boat that I’m in right now.

Misty

says:

Thank you for this post. I have just began tutoring three children. It has been an encouragment.

Erin

says:

Starting multiple children this year. Thanks for the tips!

Katie B

says:

These are some great tips! I have three kids close in age, so I wasn’t sure I could make a scripted curriculum work and get to all of them, but there were some great ideas in here that made me see hat it is possible.

Thanks for your note, Katie! Let us know if you have any questions as you teach your three kids. We are here to help! :)

Jessica

says:

Good tips! We love AAR!

Alicia

says:

Great ideas. I am adding a third student this year and I know I will need what I learned here. Thanks!

Sarah

says:

Thank you!

Theresa

says:

Great blog!

Crystal Constant

says:

This would be such a great opportunity! This is my first year homeschooling!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

I hope you have a GREAT first year, Crystal!!! Let us know if there is anything we can do to help.

Gloria

says:

Wow! This is really great. Thank you for the opportunity.

Paula

says:

I am interested in fun ways to help two children learn to read. My son is 3 and autistic and my daughter is almost 2

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Paula,
Our blog post on Teaching Reading and Spelling to Autistic Children will be of help to you. Also, we have a lot of blog posts, many with free printables, about teaching preschoolers.

Ellen G

says:

We just completed are 1st year of AAS level 2 after trying other curriculums and my 9 yr old loved it! Spelling used to be a struggle for her. My pre-k daughter would sometimes sit by and listen while playing with her own letters or would help put the tiles back in place on the magnetic board that we usually lean up against the couch or easel. I am looking forward to using the next level with her and am thinking if using AAS with my kindergartener. And I am thinking about using AAR.

Mary Banford

says:

Many friends have recommended this curriculum.

Kat

says:

Thank you for sharing this program.

Shera

says:

Looking forward to giving it a try.

Kelly Grundhofer

says:

This is really helpful, thanks.

Crystal B

says:

Seems like such a cool program! I think my kids will love it

Brittany Rogers

says:

Really looking forward to learning more about aal

Lori L Widener

says:

I am teaching multiple students and would LOVE to use this.

Danielle M

says:

I am teaching multiple students!

Rachel

says:

I loved the suggestions for organizing AAR! Thank you!

Jackie L.

says:

We love All About Spelling!

Amy R.

says:

I’ve used the first two levels with my kinesthetic son over the past two years, & he”s really getting it! Spelling is his hardest subject, but this method has proven successful for us. The hands-on approach works with his learning style. I’ll continue to use All About Spelling!

Marie Rippel

says: Customer Service

Thanks for sharing your son’s success with us! It is great to hear!

Sarah

says:

I can’t wait to use this with my kids this year!

Koelle

says:

I am so thankful that this curriculum allows me to teach both my dyslexic and non-dyslexic learners at the same time!

Jen Spencer

says:

I taught 3 levels for the past 2 years. AAS makes it doable! I made additional “review” dividers for our box of spelling/sound/key cards with each child’s name, so I could keep track of who needed to review, and also for the “future” so I could keep track of whose future the card was in :) The cards only went to the mastered section if even the youngest was done with them.

I tried to spend 15 minutes a day with each child, at most 20. In this way I could teach 3 levels of spelling in under an hour. I did not teach them all back to back though. It was throughout the day, when the other children had independent work to do. 15 minutes was plenty for my younger two but occasionally my oldest who was in level 7 this year took a little longer, usually because we had missed a few days and were doing a larger chunk of a lesson. The oldest didn’t need the daily reinforcement as much as my younger two, and did fine with having spelling on average 3 days a week.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Jen,
Thank you for sharing the details about your organization for teaching three levels of All About Spelling at once. Great point about older students may not need as much daily review.

Candyce McCown

says:

Intrigued, want to learn more about this for my between 2nd and 3rd grader!

Kirsten

says:

About to start AAR and AAS with my 3 children. So excited to have discovered this program and very appreciative of all the tips for teaching multiples.

Lisa

says:

These are all great ideas, thank you for sharing!

Jenette

says:

Thanks for the tips! With 6 littles I need a program that has little prep work!

Bethany

says:

This year I will have 2 kids learning to read and spell. Thanks for the tips!

Margaret

says:

I have 3 kids just starting AAS level 1. Some are flying through it some are going slower. But they all like it.

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Margaret,

I’m so glad your kids are enjoying the program. It sounds like everyone is off to a good start!

Jocelyn

says:

This was great help for me! I am going to be teaching AAR Pre-Level, AAS 1, and AAS 2 next year and getting a little nervous!

Merry

says: Customer Service

Hi Jocelyn,

I’m glad this was helpful! If you ever have questions along the way, know we’re here to help!

Paige

says:

I use post it notes in the teachers manual to mark exactly which dictations we are ready for, one post it for each child.
I found it very confusing to use one card box for two children in the same level and my children hated the cards anyway. (Weird kids) So I don’t use the cards at all! Instead, I have a checklist of the blue keys and we review one old key and the current one each day, and they get to color in the box on the checklist.
For the green spelling words and the red and yellow cards, I just write the letters/ words on a list, one list for each child and check mark each red letter/green word if they spell it correctly. If they need more reinforcement words, I add them to the end of the list. When we are finished with a lesson, I add the next lesson’s words to the list. For the yellow cards, i just point to the letter tile and they say the sounds. I check it off my list if they get it right. Two or three checkmarks are considered mastered. Works great! And I actually like it better than all those cards myself. I think it is less time consuming and less “messy”. It is much easier to grab for an in-the-car lesson. :)
My tiles are on an extremely small 12″ x12″ magnetic dry erase board that folds and snaps shut. It is what i had on hand and it works!

Merry

says: Customer Service

Thanks for sharing how you make things work for you and your kids, Paige! I love the Post-it flags–they are sturdier than the notes (they stand up like a tab divider)–we used them as bookmarks and in all of my teacher’s guides!

Nicole

says:

Excited to try AAR with my son

This program sounds very interesting and i think my granddaughter would love it.

April Whetter

says:

This was very encouraging to read. Thank you for such practical suggestions.

Stacy G

says:

I love these ideas!! I have 2 kids on very different levels and reading this gives me a bit more reassurance that this can be done fairly easily. Thank you!

Merry

says: Customer Service

You’re welcome, Stacy! You can definitely do this. My children each needed individual help in reading, math, writing, and spelling. AAR and AAS can definitely make that more doable. I hope you have a great year!

Miranda West

says:

Great ideas. I’ll have two in different levels I’ll be teaching next year.

Leonie

says:

Awesome ideas! Very helpful!

Jennell

says:

Great ideas!

Raelene

says:

All about spelling is a great way to improve a child’s confidence and skill in spelling

Victoria Edwards

says:

I have always been a great speller and reader, but my husband is the opposite. Unfortunately, 2 out of our 3 children take after their dad:\ I can’t wait to get started with All About Reading/All About Spelling for them!

Patrick McLaughlin

says:

Interesting ideas! Having a routine/system that the children are trained in so that you don’t waste time | Grouping like activities together | Using the older sibling as a teacher (and for their own practice) … Thanks!

Shelanne

says:

I have 2 girls who are 19 months apart. I am actually holding my oldest back a little in spelling and am going to try and get my younger one finished with level 1 over the summer and then next year I plan to teach them level 2 together. I am hoping it will work well. When my 3 year old is ready for spelling in a few years, I am going to have my older two help her learn.

Shonda Knowlton

says:

I have two kids. I don’t teach reading and spelling on the same day. I do Reading 2x a week and spelling 2x a week. When the reading lesson has a story I plan it so the other one is doing a lesson. I’m relaxed and go at the page of the kids. They are 6 and 8.

Heather M.

says:

I will be teaching two kids this coming year. Kinder and 3rd. My now 2nd grader really excelled in this program and is excited for the next level.

Michelle

says:

I’m teaching 2, and it did take some time during the day when both were in reading and spelling. However, you really can do 15min lessons (esp w spelling) 4 or less days a week and still finish a book within the year. I think the time is worth it though because they are learning the spelling rules real well.

Julie

says:

I appreciate the chance to hear from those who are using the program with multiple students!

My 6yo has started doing copywork all on her own. She once copied an entire book of her own volition! Granted, it was Yummy Yucky, by Leslie Patricelli, but it was the first such “assignment” she’d had. My 3yo takes right after her sister – she’s already picking out random letters.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Michelle,
I love the stage when they are so happy to copy words down. One of my copied everything, even the cereal box!

Bethany

says:

My girls and I absolutely love AAR and AAS! My oldest uses AAR 2 and AAS 1, my middle uses AAR 1, and my youngest uses pre-1 with Ziggy (and we have a baby boy crawling around). The scripted, open-and-go approach is the only way this could work for me! I keep sticky notes to keep our place in both the teacher manuals and the student workbooks and I keep it all easy to grab. I keep the two older girls’ flashcards in the same box with two sets of dividers since there is room for both. These ideas are great!

Nicole

says:

And sometimes one kid just needs to wait their turn for the reader book or for me to be able to work directly with them. Patience building! Though I do try to have one busy with this part while the other gets that part done.

Christy

says:

I’ve taught two kids the same level at the same time and I think it’s worked wonderfully! They alternate decoding and spelling words, and get to play the games together which feels like less work for me. I’ve taught a third child a lower level and I find that All About Reading and All About Spelling are so well developed and complete that my hands on teaching time has loads of benefit which makes me feel great as a homeschool teacher!

Mrs A

says:

I teach five children on daily basis while scheduling various subjects & supplements. I also have my two younger children take their lunch/play break an hour ahead of the three older ones which seems to help with time & work management because it allows me to individually instruct when necessary, grade papers, record-keep & further plan for extra practice with problem subjects. Plus the older ones are gaining more independence for their school work, lunch prep, tidiness & playtime management. Our days have become more pleasant, consistent & the work time flows better.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Mrs. A,
Thank you for sharing this. I found your system of split lunch hours interesting. It shows that thinking out of the box can make a difference in how your day flows!

Renee

says:

I found it very helpful to have my older children take care of the preschool children on half hour rotations while I was working with individual children. They could to math and other subjects on their own but enjoyed the time to “play with the little ones”. It was a huge help to getting school work done with several children.

Jenna

says:

Thank you for the helpful tips!!

Heather

says:

I’ve never used all about spelling but want to!

Rebecca

says:

I am teaching reading and spelling to 4 kids (though one is a baby). I don’t think I’m doing a great job with spelling but pretty well with phonics

Melissa

says:

Thanks for the helpful tips!

Heather

says:

Awesome!

Melanie

says:

So excited to try this program! I’ve heard great things about it.

Thank to the moms who shared their experience.

Mera

says:

I’m really glad you made this post. I have been thinking about this. I have two school-aged kids and they both need help with reading and spelling. Especially spelling. I’ve used your apps and so on and almost purchased a set but we were working with other curriculum already. Now that we’re done with everything, I still really feel drawn to AAR and AAS and this post really makes me even more interested.

M

says:

My older child just finished AAS 3, and my younger is still working on AAS 1. My younger is able to read most AAS 3 words. Here are some things that have worked for us having two spelling levels in a small space:

-For reviewing word cards, they read the spelling words to “quiz” each other (I supervise the younger reader in case of a pronounciation error.) This is a big esteem-boost for both of them!

-We use one review box, with two sets of dividers in it (with only current-levels word cards, but all of the other cards.) As my younger son starts a level, we move those cards to his section, but they’re still available for review for my older son. We also do the review box on its own day, rather than as part of the lesson.

-We sometimes have lunch time “spelling bees” where I alternate giving them words to spell at their own level. They love this!

-When my younger son is learning a new rule or concept, I sometimes give the older one a chance to explain it, which helps him review some of the older material that he might not think about as often. I also have him help his little brother if he needs to spell a harder word for a writing project.

-For the white board, we place it on the table, and each child has their own side, divided by a black line. When one child is working, the other side’s tiles are upside down to them (in other words, if they were each facing each other across the table, they would each be looking at their own tiles correctly. The “upside down” side should be covered with a cloth if a child is still learning to form letters correctly or struggles with reversals or alphabetical order.) That way, my younger child doesn’t have all of the tiles he’s not using yet in his space. As he needs new tiles, we move them to his side for his lesson and then put them back for my older child’s lesson. This has the added bonus of making the alphabet tiles across the top closer and easier for them to reach, which makes the board neater and less likely to get bumped around.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you so much for sharing this. I’m sure the way you are using All About Spelling at two different levels will be helpful to others. I particularly like the lunch time spelling bee idea!

Jessica Crowe

says:

I have multi grade kiddos and low prep time is perfect!

Gen

says:

Very helpful! Thank you for making it easier for us to know how to teach beyond just what the book says with these helpful emails!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

You are welcome, Gen!

Heidi Daily

says:

This year my son will be starting kindergarten, and my daughter will be starting second grade, so I will have to figure out a schedule that works best for us. I really like the suggestion of using the older sibling to help the younger one, I think they both would enjoy it.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Heidi,
Sometimes it takes some trial and error to find a schedule that works, and then something changes and you have to adjust again. So, my advice is to not worry too much about your schedule ahead of time, because you need to actually try it out to know it will work.

Dawn

says:

AAR is great for teaching multiple kids. Mine like to work independently with the tiles while I am working with others.

Lacy v V

says:

I really like all the ideas given in this article. It is really good to know that AAS can be used for multiple children at once. My 5 older children are very good readers, and the 6th is coming along well. Spelling is where we have a bit of trouble, so I would love to try this program!

Terri

says:

Hello! Does anyone have advice about using All About Reading in a tutoring setting? Most of my students are entering 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades. I am not sure how to determine what level to use. Thanks in advance.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Terri,
We have many tutors using All About Reading with their students.

As for placement, our levels don’t match well with grade levels. Rather, we have placement tests for All About Reading to help you decide which level would be best. Also, we recommend having each student read the sample stories from the previous level online as a further confirmation. You want the student to be reading fluently with good comprehension before going to a higher level.

Level 1 sample story
Level 2 sample story
Level 3 sample story
Level 4 sample story

Evaluate (without correcting your student) for the following…

The student’s ability to decode the words in the story.
The student’s ability to comprehend the story.
Could your student fluently read the story with expression?
Did your student understand the words from a vocabulary standpoint?

Please let me know if you have any other questions!

Terri

says:

Thanks so much for your kind response. I will be utilizing the placement tests and sample stories soon!

Noel

says:

My eldest child is bilingual and did not learn English till she was 4. I believe her struggles with spelling are related to a basic language confusion. Could your program help?

Amy

says:

I have been teaching my friend’s daughter along with my daughter. Her first language is Korean, so she has still be working on speaking English more fluently. (They are both 6 and it wasn’t until about 4 that she really started to learn English) The girls just finished AAR Level 1 and I can see how the program has helped her with the sounds in English. The spelling program is quite similar with breaking down the sounds and segmenting words.
I would think that AAS would help a lot!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Noel,
Yes! We have had great reports from parents and teachers using our programs with children whose first language is not English. This blog post details Carrie’s experience using All About Reading and All About Spelling with her two English learning children.

Erica

says:

I am currently teaching my 3 oldest kids and they all prefer different ways to review spelling words: my oldest likes to write her spelling words on a white board or chalk board, one of my kids likes to do spelling bee fashion and try to spell everything aloud, and the third loves using the letter tiles. My oldest also loves the writing station activity at the end of each lesson, while my middle child prefers to go through all the extra spelling words (reinforcement). I like being able to customize each lesson but still use the same curriculum for all of them. And I have yet to hear a complaint from any of the kids when it’s time for lessons!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Erica,
It was great to read how you have customized All About Spelling to make it more pleasurable for each of your children. Yes, it is great to be able to use once curriculum for many different learners, because it is so adaptable.

Kate

says:

Thanks for all you do!

Janice

says:

We started All About Sprlling a few months ago. While my oldest is flying through the beginning levels it had been a great review for him while learning some points that were never taught in any other program, my youngest is grasping on as well. This program has been a great motivation for my youngest to make the attempt to write words on his own.

Ann

says:

I would love to try AAR- sounds so wonderful, organized and effective!! I’ve used different material to reach reading- this program sounds like a winner to me.

Carl Larsen

says:

Looks like a great program

Amanda

says:

thank you! I’m excited to use some of these great tips you have given us.

Katherine McGinn

says:

My younger daughter is excited to begin to learn using AAR like her big sister! I love the tips for having my oldest help her in this process!!

I have 4 kids and I’m current teaching 3 different levels of AAR and 3 levels of AAS. My youngest is about to start Pre-Reading but his big sister has asked to teach him! My 3rd and 4th grader do AAR twice a week and usually complete a full lesson. My 1st graders does AAR everyday but he only does one part of a lesson each day. All three do spelling everyday, but just one part of a lesson. We love sticky tabs to keep up with where we are and I lightly mark with a pencil in the teachers manual where each child needs to start next time and any sections of the lesson that need to be reviewed. I keep the kids one level below their reading for spelling. For example my level 2 reader is doing level 1 spelling. We complete a level in about one years time. I have my kids read each story in the readers twice and at the end of each spelling book we do a big review where I have them spell all of the words in the index of their book. I just call out 20 words a day, review those missed and repeat missed words before finishing up the review. It takes serval days, but it’s a nice review to end each level. I just make a copy of the index so I can check off correct words and mark missed words. We keep all of our tiles on one big board for lessons. My younger kids get so excited when new tiles are introduced that they can now use. “Wow! I get to use “Bossy R” now!” I must hear once a week, “Mom, when do I get to use the pickle one?” Having all the tiles on one board seems to build anticipation for learning and add excitement! I just completed my 5th year of teaching using AAL’s curriculum and I recommend it to everyone!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Carlyn,
Thank you for taking the time to detail how you use All About Reading and All About Spelling in your household. It sounds like you have it down to a science!

By the way, I found the same sort of anticipation for tiles with my younger students as well.

Monica

says:

I use AAR and AAS with my 5 children. I love it and find it easy to use with multiple children.

Amy

says:

I went back and forth about whether to use AAR or not. I’m so glad I took the chance and got it! My daughter and her friend (my student) just finished level 1 today. While my daughter has stayed pretty strong with each lesson, her friend is speaking English as a second language. And one might have considered moving them through the lessons individually, but I actually worked with them together. And, I was happily surprised at how well my student kept up! I truly believe that by staying along with my daughter, it helped her keep up and also modeled the learning.
I can’t say enough about how wonderful the program is!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amy,
Thank you for sharing your students’ success with us! It sounds like you had a wonderful year. Congratulations to you all on finishing AAR 1!

Ellen

says:

Hi everyone! I have used the All About Spelling in my Resource room with a small group of 4 students. It worked out great… and their teacher was very impressed on their progress with spelling tests. They had their own spelling tests that were different than their regular class, but they experienced success for the first time with your program! Hurray!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Ellen,
Thank you so much for sharing the success of your students with us. I’ll be passing this along to the entire AALP team!

Rachael

says:

Just discovered AAR and AAS! Would love for my kids to have an opportunity to use this program!

S

says:

I have four kids…12, 10, 5, 3. The two oldest do spelling together and we keep them on the same lesson. I let the little ones sit in to listen because they will end up picking up something. The two youngest are very far apart in their reading lessons so we do them one at a time. While I am working with one, one of the older ones will review with the other one.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Thank you for sharing how you have made All About Spelling and All About Reading work with your four students.

Melodie

says:

I use AAR and AAS with my 4 kids ages 9, 7, 6, and 4. The oldest is just finishing up AAR L4. He is an excellent reader. Absolutely love these programs.

Sandrine Denis

says:

Thank you for all the great suggestions on how to use AAR and AAS with multiple children.. I would like to use this program in our home school. Also, thank you for the opportunity to win a curriculum.

Lisa

says:

This is an awesome program!

carrie

says:

I’d love to try this on my kinder-1st grader this year :)

Valerie Creech

says:

Thank you for the opportunity to win AAS!

Kim

says:

I teach my three oldest boys AAS together and am starting my next three together as well. With so many children in school and little ones besides, I need all the shortcuts I can get. I know its not recommended, but I even use the same flashcards for the whole group. One or two may get a little extra review until his sibling learns the words, but it hasn’t been enough to discourage any of them. Sometimes I’ll put each at a whiteboard (or standing by my desk with a blank page in a sheet protector) to write their sounds.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Kim,
If your groups of students are near enough in ability that one set of flashcards works, then that is fine! Classrooms do it all the time. It sounds like you have figured out how to make All About Spelling work for you!

Katie

says:

All About Spelling has greatly improved my 9 year olds spelling. I must admit that I have learned a few things along the way as well.

Jennifer J

says:

Great tips and tricks! Pictures are helpful as well. Love this program!

Kristi

says:

I love this program!

Allyson

says:

Thanks for these great tips! I’ll be putting them to use with my 4! :-)

Janet Robinson

says:

Thanks! I will put these tips to use, I soon will have 4 at once.

Destiny Crum

says:

My son hasn’t been officially diagnosed with dyslexia but he has the trademark symptoms. At 8, he still isn’t a fluent reader but with AAR, he’s slowly making progress!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Destiny,
I’ve had a few kids that were not fluently reading at 8 years old, but all of them are reading fluently now. Little by little, ongoing progress is the way to get there. However, if you ever have concerns or need help, please contact us. We would love to help you help your son succeed.

Terry

says:

Great program!

Candy

says:

Thanks so much for this. Having 12 kids to juggle school for, and 4 that need a lot of help with spelling, plus one the is dyslexic, time is a precious commodity around here. I appreciate the tips on how to make things work without compromising the quality of the finished product .

Ellen

says:

Hey mom… You rock! God bless you and all 12 children!

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Candy,
I happy to know you found this helpful. It can be difficult to give each student the focus they need, but there are ways to make it work.

KTJ

says:

love the multi modality input

KTJ

says:

I used this program in a k classroom to fabulous success so I had to say it again!

KTJ

says:

I used this program in a k classroom to fabulous success

Angela C Poovey

says:

We AAR & AAS… my girls have been using this curriculum for years! After trying multiple curriculums and having problems with fluency, this one actually worked!

Christine Coleman

says:

So many helpful tips- thank you! I love AAS!

Melissa

says:

All about reading has helped my boys grasp how to read. One is dyslexic and this is the only program that has worked for him. :)

Wendy

says:

Sounds like a great system, I can’t wait to give it a try with my four kids ages 5-11!

Kayla

says:

Wonderful post! I hope to teach my 2 children reading and spelling at a somewhat even pace and am always looking for pointers on how to succeed.

Stephanie Cardoza

says:

Great ideas!

Lacey

says:

Thanks for this helpful article! I’ve loved my experience with AAR and AAS, but always love to hear from others to see how they make it work for them!

kylah

says:

Thanks so much for the tips! I’m sure my eldest will love being the teacher’s helper :)

Grace

says:

I’m saving this for later when my youngest is a little older and I will have two at a time. I LOVE the idea of having the older help teach the younger, because I know my older would LOVE that!

Dana

says:

I’m getting ready to add my younger son to our school full time. Love these tips! I plan to have my oldest read some of his lessons to his brother.

Erica

says:

I love All About Spelling!

Kenzie

says:

Oh, I love the idea of having an older child help teach younger siblings. It would take a load off mom’s shoulders, but also reinforce those basics for the older kid.

Holly

says:

Wow! Great article!

Tabetha n Thomas

says:

Thank you for the chance to win.

Amber

says:

Great insight. We have 5 kids and teaching differnt levels is a question I had too.

Robin E.

says: Customer Service

Amber,
I have 5 children as well. Because of their ages, I have never had more than 3 of them working in All About Spelling and All About Reading at any one time, but I still had times of having to work with the other 2 one-on-one with something each day (I remember long sessions involving geometry proofs, for example). It isn’t easy to juggle 5 unique learners, but it is possible and very rewarding!

Machell Duke

says:

I love the idea of the older children helping the younger.

Kala

says:

This was helpful! Thank you!

Jennifer Robbins

says:

This looks amazing!

Jennifer Robbins

says:

This looks amazing! Can’t wait to try it!

Catherine

says:

Great article! This information is very helpful to me.

kara

says:

LOVE AAS!!!

Katie

says:

Great info!

Amy

says:

Wonderful info!

Chassidy

says:

Great information! Thank you!

Nicole

says:

As both a teacher and now a homeschooling mom I’m always looking for exciting ways to teach reading and spelling. This is great advice and with 4 kids all at different levels I appreciate the insight.

Cyndi

says:

There are some great ideas in this post.

Christina

says:

This is an extremely helpful article. I want to try this now:) thank you!

Lara

says:

Very helpful! Thank you!

Belen

says:

This article was helful for me to see that the spelling program is easy to use for busy parents and adaptable to a variety of learning styles and abilities.

Michelle

says:

Love all about reading and spelling!

Karen

says:

Seems like a wonderful system. Lots of great tips on this post.

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